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View DrTebi's profile

Confused about air compressor fittings

by DrTebi
posted 01-11-2016 08:50 AM


30 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2818 days


#1 posted 01-11-2016 09:51 AM

If the sales staff can’t fix you up with the right stuff to fit whatever compressor you buy you need to shop somewhere else.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

960 posts in 1950 days


#2 posted 01-11-2016 09:57 AM

Air hoses typically come with brass pipe threads, ready to accept the quick-connect fitting of your choice.

For nail guns, I use 1/4” hose—although 3/8” hose is ok, too, but 1/4” fittings should be plenty.

There are two common “standard” quick-connect fittings: Milton-type, and Tru-Flate type (sometimes called “type M” and “type T”). Around here, the Milton is the most common, but when I lived in another state, Tru-Flate was more common. Pick your style.

Milton:

Tru-Flate:

You can make an adapter by threading the male end of one type into the female end of another type.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2818 days


#3 posted 01-11-2016 10:02 AM

I looked up that compressor and it say it comes with 2 universal air couplers. The universal coupler with fit the 3 most popular fittings.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3219 posts in 2766 days


#4 posted 01-11-2016 01:31 PM

DrTebi, it depends on how much air you will need and the distance you will need to run the hose. 1/4” should be fine for the purposes you mentioned, but if you ever want to use an air sander at a distance you would need to go to 3/8” hose and fittings. I recently purchased a PVC hose and like it because it is lighter weight and less expensive than a rubber one. You don’t need 3/8” however.

-- Art

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

503 posts in 1634 days


#5 posted 01-11-2016 02:08 PM

Don’t forget the Teflon pipe tape!

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

319 posts in 3775 days


#6 posted 01-11-2016 06:29 PM

OK, I am a little smarter now. But as I mentioned before, it seems that all hoses come with a screw-type end, called MPT or MNPT fitting. So in order to connect nail gun and compressor, I need to get 1/4” interchange connectors, is that correct?

So I need, for example, an MPT to Industrial Interchange adapter for both ends of the hose?

I have a the Teflon pipe tape…

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7478 posts in 2708 days


#7 posted 01-11-2016 06:38 PM

The hoses rarely have quick connects. They use pipe thread fittings as you noticed. Get a male quick connect for one end, and a quick coupler (female) for the other… I’ve used the HF ones and they seem to do just as good a job as any of the others: In essence, you are just extending the quick coupler that is on the compressor out to the end of the hose.

But you can get them at any of the big box stores, tractor supply, hardware stores, etc…

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 2619 days


#8 posted 01-11-2016 06:56 PM

Milton makes three versions, following Alaska guy’s graphic above, you’ll see Type M, A, or I on the package. They don’t interchange well, if at all. If you look closely at Jerry’s graphic, the Tru-Flate is the same as a Milton Type A.

Lots of nail guns, including some Porter Cable examples, come with a Type M connector pre-installed.

Shop around, Milton prices can vary widely. I’m lucky to have a local tool shop, Coastal Tool, that sells all three genuine Milton variants at extremely attractive prices.

I have some of the Harbor Freight type M, and some work fine, others don’t completely seal if the female is disconnected, and a few others have gotten stuck together, where the female wouldn’t eject the male end, so I went back to buying Milton. I also have some connectors from the big box home centers, and they appear identical to the Harbor Freight versions, but function better. This may be one of those HF items where the buyer is the QC dept.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5986 posts in 3322 days


#9 posted 01-11-2016 08:22 PM

Set everything up with quick connect fittings. That way it is easy to remove the hose from the compressor, or change tools. I have always used the Milton type (type 15 in the photo above). They work fine. My compressor has a female quick connect, and the end of the hose has a male quick connect.
On the other end of the hose I have a female quick connect, and the tool itself has a male quick connect.

I run a 50’ 3/8” Flexzilla hose, which works fine. 3/8 hose is compatible with 1/4” NPT fittings, it is just a slightly larger hose diameter.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

503 posts in 1634 days


#10 posted 01-11-2016 10:36 PM

I own 7 nail/staple guns (PC/Bostich/Dewalt). They all came with the 1/4” “male” quick connect fittings installed. If you go with a “pancake” compressor it will likely come with a hose “ready to go”. Other hoses will likely come with the threaded male…I buy those kits that include the female quick connect and other pieces (like tire inflators). Won’t break the bank.

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

319 posts in 3775 days


#11 posted 01-12-2016 01:01 AM

Alright, so I think my questions have been answered, thanks to everyone.

I will need a hose and couplers. That’s the part I was most unsure about.

Now I have another question… I just looked into the manual of the finishing nailer, and it says that it requires 9.39 SCFM with 100 fasteners per minute @90 psi. But that doesn’t mean my compressor does need to have 9.39 SCFM, does it? If that’s so, I am looking at a big compressor in the $800+ range

If I use a compressor with less SCFM, does it simply mean it will shoot less nails per minute, or will I not have enough power to properly seat a e.g. 2 1/2” nail?

Man this stuff is confusing… maybe I should just keep hammering by hand, but I have at least 300 lft more to go in baseboards etc!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 3199 days


#12 posted 01-12-2016 03:05 AM

The pressure (PSI) dictates how deep you can sink a nail. The SCFM dictates nails per minute.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

319 posts in 3775 days


#13 posted 01-12-2016 06:05 AM


The pressure (PSI) dictates how deep you can sink a nail. The SCFM dictates nails per minute.

- gfadvm


Thanks, that makes more sense. The funny thing is, the online manual of the same nailer must be newer, and they took out the SCFM requirement completely.

Anyway, I went with the following items:

  • DEWALT DWFP55130 (link)
  • Goodyear EP 46504 (link)
  • Central Pneumatic 12 Piece Professional Air Tool Accessory Kit (link)

... and a few nails. Should work.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7478 posts in 2708 days


#14 posted 01-12-2016 06:17 AM

* Central Pneumatic 12 Piece Professional Air Tool Accessory Kit (link)
- DrTebi

Not to distract from your purchases… but that “Central Pneumatic” kit for $25 on amazon is an HF brand and can be had for $12 directly from Harbor Freight with a 20% off coupon (or $14.99 without one). I’m amazed that Amazon has that much of a mark-up for a HF tool.

Also, CFM (or SCFM) is pretty irrelevant to a nailer… it only shoots a short burst with each nail at the rated PSI. That is why the little bitty pancake compressors can be used. CFM is much more important for something like a spray gun or die grinder where the air stream is for the most part continuous, and the CFM rating of the compressor will dictate how long it can be run before having to kick in. Using a high demand CFM tool with a low CFM capable compressor will cause it to run continuously, and could eventually over-run the compressors ability to run the tool at all.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

319 posts in 3775 days


#15 posted 01-12-2016 06:27 AM

  • Central Pneumatic 12 Piece Professional Air Tool Accessory Kit (link)
    - DrTebi

Not to distract from your purchases… but that “Central Pneumatic” kit for $25 on amazon is an HF brand and can be had for $12 directly from Harbor Freight with a 20% off coupon (or $14.99 without one). I m amazed that Amazon has that much of a mark-up for a HF tool.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


Yes, but I would have to pay shipping… which I don’t with Amazon. I am not a Amazon fanboy or anything, but sometimes it just works out the best.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7478 posts in 2708 days


#16 posted 01-12-2016 06:50 AM

Yes, but I would have to pay shipping… which I don’t with Amazon.
- DrTebi

Or just pick it up at the store :)

They are based out of CA and have more store in that state than any other AFAIK… (and a quick search turned up 10 near SF)... You mean you don’t have one somehere close? I feel for you man! I’m in a little rinky dink town all the way across the country that the majority of the country has never even heard of, and we even got one!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

319 posts in 3775 days


#17 posted 01-12-2016 07:52 AM



Yes, but I would have to pay shipping… which I don t with Amazon.
- DrTebi

Or just pick it up at the store :)

They are based out of CA and have more store in that state than any other AFAIK… (and a quick search turned up 10 near SF)... You mean you don t have one somehere close? I feel for you man! I m in a little rinky dink town all the way across the country that the majority of the country has never even heard of, and we even got one!

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


Well, the thing is, I don’t own a car… I do the city-car-share thing and do the occasional big grocery shopping day, or get their truck for picking up wood. But for $15 savings it would not be worth it :)

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 1461 days


#18 posted 01-12-2016 10:50 AM

Get all your fittings from the same co. I got tired of my variety of same type connectors not connecting. Threw them all out and went with one brand.

View raymello's profile

raymello

2 posts in 393 days


#19 posted 09-20-2018 05:51 AM

I wonder if anyone is still following this discussion. I, too, am confused about compressor couplers.
I won a compressor and nail gun in a raffle! It was a DeWalt DWFP55126 Compressor and it comes with one length of hose. I want to buy a blow-gun for cleaning off dust and am looking at one from Milton. But I’m confused about the fittings. The compressor lists that it takes 1/4” thread and that the hose is fitted for “universal industrial quick-release” . So I know I need to put a 1/4 female to a quick-release fitting on the blow gun I buy. But as described above (two years ago, I know, but maybe someone will see this message) Milton lists several styles of quick-connect: M-, A-, T-, AMT-, D-, L-, and V-style. No where in DeWalt’s manual or on their website can I find anything that give me more specific information than “industrial quick-release.” Which style from Milton would I buy to fit the hose and connectors that came with this compressor and nail gun kit?
Thank you so much for helping!

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

960 posts in 1950 days


#20 posted 09-20-2018 05:34 PM

The array of air fittings can be confusing, for sure.

The two most common 1/4” fittings—in my experience—are the “Milton” type (sometimes called type M or type 16) and the “Tru-Flate” (sometimes called type T or type 15). Your “Universal” female fitting should fit both.

Your blow-gun should be connected to a male fitting, not a female. The first fitting exiting the compressor should be female (so it keeps the pressure in the tank when the hose is disconnected). The air tools that you attach to the hose should have male fittings.

Here is a pic of 3 fairly common fitting types. HTH

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Oxford's profile

Oxford

19 posts in 393 days


#21 posted 09-20-2018 05:54 PM

I have had trouble getting the ‘Universal’ connectors to work with all fittings.

So I have taken to installing a ‘Y’ block and putting both ‘M’ and ‘T’ fittings on my compressors. That way I can’t lose them and can always connect any hose up.

Always a good idea to make up a kit that has a few of every sort of connector so when someone shows up with an obscure connector you can adapt to it. They’re pretty cheap all in all. Fasten it to the compressor so you can’t misplace it. Don’t forget to restock it when you have to give someone else a fitting because they don’t have such a kit! ;-)

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5715 posts in 3752 days


#22 posted 09-21-2018 06:55 PM

Just remember you will need a male and a female fitting at every place where a connection is made. the male fitting goes into the female fitting; very intuitive.

View raymello's profile

raymello

2 posts in 393 days


#23 posted 09-22-2018 03:52 AM

In case anyone was wondering, it turned out a nearby hardware store had fittings labeled “M/I” that fit the DeWalt “Universal” just right. They look like the Milton M-style. Now I’m all set, and I’ve figured out which hardware store around here carries them.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

960 posts in 1950 days


#24 posted 09-22-2018 04:13 PM

Glad to hear it, Ray. Hope we helped

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2102 posts in 1112 days


#25 posted 09-22-2018 04:44 PM



If the sales staff can t fix you up with the right stuff to fit whatever compressor you buy you need to shop somewhere else.

- AlaskaGuy


+1

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5715 posts in 3752 days


#26 posted 09-22-2018 08:27 PM

I bought air fittings at HF and from Lowes and they were terrible. They didn’t seat properly and would leak when stressed. I will be replacing them with Milton fittings. They cost more, but are better.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

742 posts in 420 days


#27 posted 09-22-2018 09:03 PM

All of your air coupler fittings do the same job purpose. It’s best to have the same fit couplers put on all your air tools. Milton brand or the Rema brand are better quality couplers, and easier to use. I doesn’t matter which type of air coupler you use. But use the same coupler on all your air tools and hoses. For a small shop, a portable 3 gallon air compressor is all you need. DO NOT BUY THE 100psi compressor. pay the extra $20 for the 150psi compressor. The Bostitch brand is the same as DeWalt & Porter/Cable, and cost less. I paid for mine $100 on sale, and came with 3 different staple guns. I use a magic marker and write on the air tank the minimum and maximum air pressure range of each of my staplers & nailers, so I can change the regulator settings for each one I use. For the air hose the rubber hoses have better flexing for easier use.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3072 posts in 2534 days


#28 posted 09-23-2018 03:59 AM

I suspect the 1/4” size mentioned often in describing these fittings may refer to the pipe thread at the end of the hose. Use teflon plumber’s tape when you put fittings on the hose to prevent leaks.

If your compressor doesn’t come with a regulator, you should install one. Not very expensive, and easy to mount. The regulator easily lets you set the maximum air pressure you will get at the tool. Just turn a knob and watch the dial until it points to the pressure you want.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1891 posts in 2003 days


#29 posted 09-23-2018 09:25 AM

+1 find a type, brand, and supplier you like and use them everywhere. Mix and match just creates frustration and leaks.

Type M is considered to be more durable due the longer engagement lock. It also provided higher airflow than type I, when it was introduced many years ago as it had a larger ID. This is reason it was preferred in automotive market. Current type I fittings have enlarged the ID, and flow rates have become very similar between two (32SCFM .vs. 40SCFM). The minimal air flow difference has increased confusion selecting between two types.

Hate to make this more confusing,
but here goes:

There are many more pneumatic hose fitting types than most common listed above.
While the 3 mentioned in beginning of this thread will met needs for majority of users, there are some who might want to spend time learning about newer styles?
There are available high flow H, P, & V styles; which can be backward compatible with conventional M and I style fittings. The best part about newer styles is ~2x higher airflow. If all you need to use are nail gun, or spray gun for wood working; then you probably don’t care about high flow. But if you to best performance from sand blasting, automotive impact wrench, or air chisel; you will like the difference that higher air flow fittings make.
I switched my air system to use style V, and will not use conventional styles for my high SCFM air tools again. I have demonstrated several times on stubborn bolts that normal ~30SCFM flow fittings lacked enough energy after even 30 seconds of use, but ~65SCFM fittings would remove bolt in seconds; both using same 6 SCFM rated tool via 50 ft of 3/8 inch hose. Best part of type V, is that the type I fittings on my Porter nail guns snap right on, without any leaks. So if your garage shop is dual use wood working and auto repair like mine, check out the type P or V fittings.

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View bigike's profile

bigike

4057 posts in 3797 days


#30 posted 08-10-2019 08:07 PM

Dam that universal fitting is sweet im tryin to get 1 rite now LOL

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://[email protected]

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