LumberJocks

boxes

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by rickf16 posted 01-24-2009 04:04 AM 1489 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rickf16's profile

rickf16

392 posts in 4221 days


01-24-2009 04:04 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have been asked to make a set of grips and a display box for .45cal 1911. My question is this: is there a set rule on thickness for the box depending on size or is it what ever the builder chooses? I’d like to use 3/4 stock, but since the box will be small, I don’t want it to look bulky. This box will be about 10X7X7 (approx.). Made from cherry w/maple accents. It will have one drawer also, if that makes a difference. I will cede to box makers as they have WAY more experience than I. Thanks for any and all comments.

Rick

-- Rick


16 replies so far

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 4076 days


#1 posted 01-24-2009 11:42 AM

Generally for a box of this size 3/4 inch stock would be too much, I think something in the area of 12 to 20 mm thick should do the trick. Approx. 3/8 of an inch? (I did the conversion in my head 1inch =2.54 cm) anyway something under 1/2 inch definetly… because like you said it would look too bulky if it is thicker I think. drawers , small ones, are good with a material about the same (8- 16 mm or so)

do you have a sketch? or a plan? it would be nice to see

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View Moron's profile

Moron

5047 posts in 4533 days


#2 posted 01-24-2009 02:23 PM

a nice box joint or doves enables you to make the box carcass thinner

smaller the box, thinner the wood…..........3/8” or even less

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

392 posts in 4221 days


#3 posted 01-26-2009 08:12 PM

Thanks for the ideas and advice. I think I will go with 1/2 thick stock for the case and drawer. I do not have a dove tail jig—-yet. I may do box joints but I plan on attaching some feet cut from chair rail molding and so I’m not sure how box joint would look with dress feet. As for a plan Nicholas, they’re in my head. I am putting together a rendition in Sketchup and as soon as they are finalized, I will post them. Not anytime soon though, I still have to get better with Sketchup. Thanks again

-- Rick

View sry's profile

sry

147 posts in 4248 days


#4 posted 01-26-2009 10:55 PM

Perfect timing on this thread. I’m planning on building a small jewelry box (about 10”W x 6”D x 5” H) and have been agonizing over the wood thickness to use: 1/2” or 3/8”

Just looking at some quick sketchup drawings I put together, I think 3/8” is the way to go for my box. You might find that seeing your plans in 3D helps make up your mind

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16284 posts in 4858 days


#5 posted 01-26-2009 11:03 PM

I think either 3/8 or 1/2 will be fine. I’ve made some pretty small boxes in 1/2” material, and I don’t think they looked bulky. 3/4” on the other hand is way too bulky for a small box, unless you are going for that look intentionally:

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 4708 days


#6 posted 01-27-2009 07:15 AM

Rick, I’m going to diverge from the group a little on this one. Normally I would agree that 3/4 is too thick for a 10×7x7 box. 3/8 being more along the lines I would normally choose. But in this case I think the function influences the form. This is a box for a firearm. A fairly substantial firearm, with a tendency to a blocky form itself. A substantial box with a heft to it might not be all bad. Any of the thicknesses would work, the 1/2 is probably a good middle ground, but I don’t think you would have been wrong in this case if you had gone with the 3/4.

Is the pistol engraved? If it is have you considered replicating any of the carvings into the box? Just crossed my mind as something that would look cool and tie the two items together.

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

392 posts in 4221 days


#7 posted 01-27-2009 06:30 PM

Nice boxes CC. The contrasting woods look great!

You have a good point there. Hadn’t considered the size of the firearm. I could split the difference and go with 5/8 stock. That might lend itself to the size of the gun and still make the box appealing to the eye. I plan on using cherry with a dark gel stain and as I said earlier I will be making the grips for this pistol. They will be curly maple. I am going to take a scrap piece and try a few different combo’s to get the look the customer wants. I will try to post pics of the samples this weekend. Any and all opinions are welcomed.

The pistol won’t be engraved, as far I know. He plans on putting a matte finish on it. As for carving goes, well lets just say that my skills in that endeavor are better left alone! I do plan to add some maple accents though.

-- Rick

View rtb's profile

rtb

1101 posts in 4353 days


#8 posted 01-27-2009 06:40 PM

rick are your dementions inner or outer and is the box for display or for security ?

-- RTB. stray animals are just looking for love

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

392 posts in 4221 days


#9 posted 01-28-2009 07:16 AM

Dimensions are outer and it is for display only. I asked him if he wanted to secure the box and he said no.

-- Rick

View rtb's profile

rtb

1101 posts in 4353 days


#10 posted 01-28-2009 07:18 PM

If this is a true 1911 and not one of the other versions that were produced, like the colt commander which is shorter, the it sounds like its going to be so short as to appear crammed. I can’t remember the exact dimensions length and mine is not were I am so I can’t measure it to find out but 10” minus your side thickness is between 8&1/2 and 9” and say 5” deep interior and the .45 is aprox. 7×4 it may look cramped and most pistols are displayed with the magazine out of the pistol and along side. Unless there are some other reasons I would reconsider your dimensions, I am certain that some where on line you can find some display cases to look at. I would think that 1-2 ” of free space on each end would be necessary. There are probably some LJ’s who have done this before and can offer some insight.

-- RTB. stray animals are just looking for love

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

392 posts in 4221 days


#11 posted 01-28-2009 08:20 PM

RTB, These dimensions are approximate for now. I plan on measuring the gun and finalizing everything before I start construction. I have a drawing in sketchup just to get the owners approval. I’d like to put the drawing here,but cannot figure how. Anyone who knows let me know.

-- Rick

View Moron's profile

Moron

5047 posts in 4533 days


#12 posted 01-29-2009 06:49 AM

I am a firm believer that the “basic shovel” cannot be improved, nor can the essence of a wheel be improved but, joinery has proven again and agian, that a “box” that holds a gun can, and will be changed to enhance the power that lies within and that all too often, we ignore the obvious, in that the dimensions of wood, there in, lies its strength, chosen by the craftsmen instead of the crowd.

a piece of wood joined to another is only as strong as the man who “joins” it together….........thinner is better!

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Tom Adamski's profile

Tom Adamski

306 posts in 4411 days


#13 posted 01-29-2009 07:17 AM

Rick,
The thickness of the material is very subjective. Perhapse you could get some cheap stock, (poplar, etc…) and make a mock up scale study. Don’t worry about the jointery, just butt joint it together and see for yourself how the proportions will work. I personally try to keep my boxes between 3/8 and 1/2 depending on its scale, and keep 3/4 amd 4/4 for furniture.

My thoughts…

Tom

PS, please post your progress…

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

392 posts in 4221 days


#14 posted 01-29-2009 05:55 PM

Tom, Good idea. I have done this in the past with new projects and it has shown me where problems could rise up. Saved me some aggravation too! Will try it. Look for the post at a later date. Could be a month or two though. I think the grips are gonna take a little longer.

-- Rick

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

18819 posts in 4316 days


#15 posted 02-05-2009 07:16 AM

If you do a mock up, it would be a good place to practice those first hand cut dovetails. They are easier than you might think after you’ve done it a few times. Are you going to checker the grips?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com