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Best wood for trivet

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Forum topic by sfwoodnovice posted 02-17-2014 06:56 PM 7655 views 2 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sfwoodnovice

2 posts in 2641 days


02-17-2014 06:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: trivet type of wood

Hello folks,

I’m wondering if you can help me out. I have an idea to make a nicely designed, almost an artistic, trivet out of wood. Does anyone have a recommendation for the type of wood I should use and if I need a certain type of finish? I am a complete novice so forgive me if this is an elementary question as I know not.

Thanks


22 replies so far

View basswood's profile

basswood

264 posts in 2702 days


#1 posted 02-17-2014 06:57 PM

I’ve heard Ipe can take the heat… but it can be another matter to get it to take a finish.

-- https://www.basswoodmodularllc.com/

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MisterBill

411 posts in 3333 days


#2 posted 02-17-2014 07:13 PM

The idea of a trivet is supposed to be that you put something hot on it instead of on your countertop. In other words, it is a sacrificial object. Use whatever you have on hand and don’t look back.

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sfwoodnovice

2 posts in 2641 days


#3 posted 02-17-2014 07:17 PM

Basswood,

Thanks for the input. I’ll research ipe wood and see if it’s feasible.

MisterBill,

Yes, there is a sacrifice component to a trivet but I would like to find a material that won’t burn or tarnish. There has to be some sort of wood that can withstand contact with a hot object without burning or leaving a last mark, right?

Thanks

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MisterBill

411 posts in 3333 days


#4 posted 02-17-2014 10:36 PM

SF,

Try to use the darkest and hardest/densest wood that you can find. Brazilian Cherry isn’t the darkest but it definitely hard and dense.

View Net55's profile

Net55

78 posts in 2669 days


#5 posted 02-17-2014 10:44 PM

Oil based finishes hold up better to heat. All wood will burn, go with dark hard wood when in doubt. I did some a few years ago out of tiete rosewood, not a mark on them.

-- Bill, SW Florida

View Ingjr's profile

Ingjr

144 posts in 4098 days


#6 posted 02-19-2014 12:49 AM

I’ve had a couple of walnut trivets I made years ago that look as new. I use MS, Poly, BLO in 1/3 quantities for a finish. As I almost always do.

-- The older I get the faster I was.

View Biggrhammr's profile

Biggrhammr

5 posts in 757 days


#7 posted 04-16-2019 06:22 PM

I’m doing a related project: hanging silver/pewter platters of various sizes on a wall (think high end hubcap display) using homemade French cleats while affixing “feet” or pads to the bottom of the platters. My issues are: wood that can handle warming in an oven & how to glue the cleat/feet to the platters considering heat. See prototype photo… Maple + super glue on glass.
Thoughts?

-- Biggrhammr, Oakland CA

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1483 posts in 1898 days


#8 posted 04-17-2019 02:20 AM

You are too worried about materials. I have made and sold dozens of trivets using a CNC router. I use mostly maple, cherry or walnut for aesthetic reasons rather than heat resistance. They all work fine. I finish them with solvent based polyurethane because it holds up better than lacquer or any water based finish i have tried. I have attached a few of our designs below. Some of these have been in continuous use at my home for over 3 years now and show no signs of heat damage.



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Biggrhammr

5 posts in 757 days


#9 posted 04-17-2019 03:30 AM

Gotcha. My concern here is mainly the adhesive v heat between wood & pewter. Rather esoteric. Thanks for the input!

-- Biggrhammr, Oakland CA

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Biggrhammr

5 posts in 757 days


#10 posted 04-17-2019 03:45 AM

Simply put, the owners of these things would like to be able to put them in an oven for warming & still hang them on a wall , expecting that the wood/glue/metal bond won’t fail.

-- Biggrhammr, Oakland CA

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1483 posts in 1898 days


#11 posted 04-17-2019 01:28 PM

Your requirements are so unusual that I doubt if very many people would have had any experience at all. I am afraid you are going to have to experiment and determine the answers for yourself. At the very least, you should start by using high temperature epoxy rather than PVA (Titebond, Elmer’s) or polyurethane (Gorilla) type glues. There is such a thing as thermally modified wood which might serve your needs. Here is a Wikipedia link that explains the process.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermally_modified_wood

I saw some slabs of thermally modified wood for sale at an import shop. I can’t remember the species. It was an exotic wood from some Central American country. It was quite attractive and reminded me of Brazillian cherry.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6991 posts in 2469 days


#12 posted 04-17-2019 02:07 PM

There are some heat resistant glues, and perhaps some suitable for joining metal and wood but the metal and wood will expand and contract at very different rates which may cause even those types of bonds to fail with such a wide temperature range. I would probably go with a mechanical connection (screws) using oversized holes to allow for expansion differences. I have also heard that ipe has a higher flash point than most woods. I would probably experiment by sticking some pieces of different woods into the oven at about 475-500 degrees for at least 30 minutes to see how the wood holds up. This is close to the flash point of oak for example so you will see if it is going to start to burn. In any event, you probably want to heat the wood before assembly to get all of the moisture and volatile compounds out of the wood prior to assembly. You might need to repeat the heating and cooling process several times. For this application, I probably would not apply a finish to the wood.

BTW, the wood feet coming out of the oven will still be hot enough to damage a surface so may need a cool base to sit this on.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2136 posts in 4380 days


#13 posted 04-17-2019 02:15 PM

Why would they want to put them in the oven?

They’re not likely to have enough thermal mass to really keep anything warm for any appreciable amount of time.

If they want to keep stuff warm at the table, look into more active solutions like chafing dishes and such.

Trivets are meant to protect a table from hot pots, pans, or dishes. A 400-degree dish won’t burn hardwood.

View theart's profile

theart

233 posts in 1636 days


#14 posted 04-17-2019 04:00 PM


I’m doing a related project: hanging silver/pewter platters of various sizes on a wall (think high end hubcap display) using homemade French cleats while affixing “feet” or pads to the bottom of the platters. My issues are: wood that can handle warming in an oven & how to glue the cleat/feet to the platters considering heat. See prototype photo… Maple + super glue on glass.
Thoughts?

- Biggrhammr

I wouldn’t glue that. It would be better to solder some threaded brass rods to the pewter and use nuts/washers in counterbores to hold the wood on.

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Biggrhammr

5 posts in 757 days


#15 posted 04-17-2019 04:09 PM

Thanks all for the feedback! Very useful.

-- Biggrhammr, Oakland CA

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