LumberJocks

lathe chucks?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by scottb posted 06-16-2007 04:42 AM 5629 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 4890 days


06-16-2007 04:42 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe chuck

a little overwhelmed by the variety, but seeming similarity, of lathe chucks out there.

What do you recommend someone who hasn’t turned any bowls yet, and may be interested in adding on accessories later, without needing to get a new chuck. Is the $80 woodcraft as good as the $100-199 ones out there either Penn State or the Supernovas, or are the $200+ ones really that much better (for the non-professional)

I’m currently using a shopsmith ER – 5/8 plain spindle, or a 8 TPI, though I may be getting a midi lathe in the next year or so and would like to be able to use this on either.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/


16 replies so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

35209 posts in 4963 days


#1 posted 06-16-2007 04:52 AM

Scott: Penn State and a friend of mine has the Nova chuck. I don’t see a lot of difference in them except $$$

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia [email protected]

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14578 posts in 4629 days


#2 posted 06-16-2007 07:57 AM

Scott, I can’t really speak much about the other chucks – I have the SuperNova and I ind that it will do everything I’ve ever wanted to do. I have a Nova lathe and I think that it was part of the deal when I bought the lathe. This is my third lathe, the first was a cheapie that I sold a long time ago and I have a Shureline mini-lathe set up for pen turning.

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 4862 days


#3 posted 06-16-2007 12:45 PM

I bought the 3 1/4” chuck from Grizzly that I like, But I don’t see an adapter for 5/8×8. If you buy a chuck, you can usually get the adapter later for just about any size spindle.

I also bought their cupped tail centers, & spur centers at a very good price. They’re on the next page of the catalog.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View USCJeff's profile

USCJeff

1065 posts in 4631 days


#4 posted 06-16-2007 04:40 PM

I got very overwhelmed when I went Lathe shopping in April. I found a great Jet VS mini-lathe for under $300. As I went to the store, I noticed that the $300 lathe was the cheap part of the purchase. My buddy at the store started handing me $200 Nova chucks and turning tools @ $50 each. Gotta have a good sharpening system. $$$$$$. I’m using a 6” face plate and held off on the chuck. The chuch is very, very convenient, but you can get by with just the face plate for many applications. I’d suggest getting the longer handled tools, however. I got a couple good long ones and a small kit of shorter ones. Much more control with the big ones. I find that the smaller ones are hard to control at high speeds even if they are sharp.

I’ve never heard a bad word about Nova chucks. But if I spent $200+ for one, I’d have trouble talking bad about it too!

-- Jeff, South Carolina

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14358 posts in 4660 days


#5 posted 06-16-2007 05:00 PM

Lol. Buying a lathe starts you down the slippery slope…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mot's profile

mot

4926 posts in 4599 days


#6 posted 06-16-2007 05:14 PM

Oh yeah, the cheapest part of turning is the lathe. I have a SuperNova2 and a Nova Titan chuck. I also have a Nova Midi chuck but it’s the wrong size for my new lathe. There are alot of people that get by with faceplates and jam chucks absolutely. I found that the versatility of the SN2 with a woodworm screw pretty much covers all of my turning.

However, like you, when I got into turning I was suprised…

Lathe – $400
Tools – $400
Chucks – $400
Grinder, Good wheels, sharpening jig – $400
Chainsaw – $400
Better tools – $400
Hollowing rig – $400
Coring Tools – $400
New lathe – $400 +$400….......+$400

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14358 posts in 4660 days


#7 posted 06-16-2007 09:42 PM

Hey Tom you forgot the Bandsaw with 12” depth of cut…. $800

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Tony's profile

Tony

993 posts in 4593 days


#8 posted 06-16-2007 11:01 PM

Now for my two pennies worth. After my plea for help in turning a goblet – I bought some accessories for my lathe.

All this came from Oneway (Europe) Talon Chuck 171.55 €, #1 Jaws 33.58€, #3 jaws 41.34€ – It has not arrived yet, but it get some extremely good write-ups. Oneway had a good slection of adapters and interfaces for various lathes – that was a main reason for choosing them. http://www.oneway.on.ca/chucks/adaptors.htm

Tom, I also purchased a termite 74.96€, upon your recommendation –

Good luck with your selection – it’s a minefield of choices

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View mot's profile

mot

4926 posts in 4599 days


#9 posted 06-16-2007 11:07 PM

Tony…I love the Termite…how do you like it?

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 4587 days


#10 posted 06-16-2007 11:28 PM

I’ve been using one of the original Nova chucks (now called the Nova Midi) for almost 20 years, and I love it. Of course, I’ve ended up with every (I think) jaw set made for it – whether I really needed it or not – you never know. I’ve thought about adding a Super Nova or Titan body, but haven’t really needed it yet. I’ve heard that the geared scroll gives you more leverage, but I’ve never had any problems with the dual-lever system. Shucks, I even turned a 15”x5” dough bowl for my wife with my little chuck.

I can’t speak for the other brands on the market, but Nova gives very good bang for the buck.

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

View mot's profile

mot

4926 posts in 4599 days


#11 posted 06-17-2007 01:27 AM

I agree GraveDigger. I looked at some Oneways. They are beautiful, but when I bought my Nova’s they seemed to be a better value. I’m sure, with the money I’ve spent on turning, the difference is now moot, but they are pretty slick. It’s nice to use the geared system over the tommy bars, but you can get used to either. There is one thing about the Tommy’s in that they give a pretty good feel that they are tight. It takes awhile to get that same confidence with the geared setup…about 2 projects.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4563 posts in 4874 days


#12 posted 06-17-2007 02:00 PM

I’ve got one of the cheaper priced one’s…$40. It is a dual levered one and has done everything I’ve needed it to do. I haven’t ever used the others, but you have to get what fits your budget, yet get something that is well made.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View SteveM's profile

SteveM

108 posts in 4730 days


#13 posted 06-18-2007 03:10 AM

I bought a Vicmark a year ago at the ATL show on the advice of Nick Cook and have been very pleased. That said, I just bought a Baracuda and am even happier with 4 sets of jaws on a chuck I like as much as the Vic for lots less money. S.

View Tony's profile

Tony

993 posts in 4593 days


#14 posted 06-18-2007 03:41 PM

TOM – Still waiting for the Termite and the chuck to arrive, they have to come from germany – I lety you know when they arrive

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 4587 days


#15 posted 06-19-2007 09:57 PM

Mot brings up a good point. It’s possible to have TOO much leverage, especially in expanding mode. I’ve cracked more than one bowl foot by applying just a bit too much pressure in a dovetail recess. If your recess is inside a flush bottom, there’s no problem because of all the wood for support. However, a foot has very little wood to resist the pressure of the chuck jaws, and a cracked foot is much easier than you might imagine. It might be obvious to a veteran turner, but a mounting of this type does not lend itself to heavy hogging. I would rough-turn the bowl first and then go to the expanding-collet mode for final finishing.

My general technique with a foot is to leave a spigot inside the foot to grip, and then reverse the bowl and turn the spigot off at the end. If your finish is a little different inside the recess, no one will notice due to the lighting differences.

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com