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Delta Planer 22-540 noisy to the point of scariness.

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Forum topic by Buckethead posted 07-01-2013 07:29 PM 14020 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Buckethead

3196 posts in 2786 days


07-01-2013 07:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer question

Some might have seen a small gloat about a thickness planer I picked up for fiddy bucks. (Fiddy bucks = $50)

So let’s be honest. I probably wasted fiddy federal reserve notes. Sure… Their value is debatable, but they aren’t getting easier to come by despite their perpetually diminishing value.

I digress.

Anyhoo… It sounded good enough when I bought it, even after I repaired a gear with sheer ingenuity. Even when I planed some stock which was about two inches wide.

Forward to today, as I began planing a piece of walnut about 6” in width. Starts off well. Gradually a sort of chattering sound, perhaps a bearing, begins to become more present. By the time I had nearly surfaced one side of this piece, the noise was nearly constant.

I disconnected the drive belt, and the motor sounds smooth, albeit loud. These things aren’t noted for quiet operation, but the chatter was not seemingly in the motor.

I looked at the schematic online, which was not particularly legible, and it doesn’t seem to list bearings for the cutter head. Perhaps they are integral? Included with the cutter head?

Fwiw, the cutter head is discontinued.

Any thoughts? Suggestions? Reprimands? Insults? (I can take it.)

(I know… Go buy a new planer, or a more quality machine from CL)

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.


14 replies so far

View Quanter50's profile

Quanter50

278 posts in 3213 days


#1 posted 07-01-2013 08:05 PM

Not to add insult to injury, but I Googled your machine and found this. Looks like someone else found the fix.

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MrUnix

8283 posts in 3116 days


#2 posted 07-01-2013 08:09 PM

Sure looks like it has bearings.. part #1086894S (Qty: 2)

( found at ereplacementparts.com )

Try spinning the cutter head by hand (with the belt off) to see if you can isolate the noise. There is another bearing in the gear assembly along with some bushings on the gears and feed rollers that could also be the problem.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Buckethead

3196 posts in 2786 days


#3 posted 07-01-2013 08:09 PM

I might have to attempt a woodgears jointer build with this planer as the victim. Still… Bad bearings will still be bad.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2839 posts in 3214 days


#4 posted 07-01-2013 08:12 PM

Cutter head has to ride on something, so just tear into it. It sounds like an easy fix.

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

3196 posts in 2786 days


#5 posted 07-01-2013 08:13 PM

Thanks mr unix.. The blowup on the delta site wasn’t legible.

When I spin the cutter head by hand, it seems to turn smoothly with no resistance. It could be as you say. I did not want to tear that deep into it, but really, what’s the harm?

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10789 posts in 4565 days


#6 posted 07-01-2013 08:58 PM

Feed roller chain drive maybe. Likely has sintered gears and
the teeth can chip off.

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Buckethead

3196 posts in 2786 days


#7 posted 07-01-2013 09:23 PM

Thanks Loren.

Those seem to check out. All teeth present, no signs of excess wear. Operating smoothly.

I think I’m actually enjoying this.

So I went ahead and checked the brushes while I have it cracked open. They are looking nearly devoid of wear.

This planer did not look unused, so perhaps they have been previously replaced. When I opened one up, a considerable amount of dust had collected. The other was clean. (A healthy “pinch” of dust)

Could this cause a racket? I used the compressor to blow it out thoroughly.

The bearings for the motor seem to spin without undue resistance or any signs of chatter.

I guess I’m going to break open the motor housing and see if there is any more dust or other obstruction.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8283 posts in 3116 days


#8 posted 07-01-2013 09:36 PM

Since you already have it apart, pull the gears and check the bushings (plain bearings).. they could probably use a good coating of grease anyway. There is a bearing behind one of them also. Might want to go ahead and clean/lube the chain while you have it off as well. One last place to check would be the block bearings that the feed rollers are in.. and give them a good coat of grease.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Buckethead

3196 posts in 2786 days


#9 posted 07-02-2013 12:20 AM

I am doing as you suggest, MrUnix.

It makes good sense to lube the works. I would be surprised if its one of the feeder rollers, because they move so much slower. That said, it could just be bone dry and demanding attention. I had been reluctant to disassemble the feeder rollers. As I backed out the screws, it became clear that there are some fairly strong springs which apply downward pressure to increase feeder friction. It looked like it might be a PITA to get it all back together.

The planer is basically disassembled, so it would be a shame to not check. The further I go into this, the simpler it seems. Fear of the unknown is fear of nothing, which is the most crippling fear of all. Thanks for the help and encouragement, everyone.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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Buckethead

3196 posts in 2786 days


#10 posted 07-02-2013 03:14 PM

Update: Success?

So I took everything apart, lubed any appropriate parts with grease, put it back together… Fired it off a few times… Let it run… And the chatter seems to have vanished. So it might have been yet another case of overdue maintenance.

I say “might” because I don’t want to jinx myself. (Not that I am superstitious, but Mr Murphy was very legalistic)

So thanks everyone!

MrUnix… Those block bearings seemed particularly dry. I think that may have been the culprit.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View IndianaMark's profile

IndianaMark

1 post in 210 days


#11 posted 05-02-2020 05:41 PM

Hi, I know this post is old, but I have found some posts about this model online and found a few statements about people scraping these units because that cannot find the sound of that knock.

Before you take a BFH to this little planer check out the feed roller block bearings. 9 times out of 10 that is the problem.

Here is what happens: The block bearings have a dual purpose in their design, of which one is not readily apparent. Primarily it is to act as a bearing for the feed rollers. The second is that they are spring loaded for uneven surfaces as it also helps keep the wood firmly held and avoid wedging a rough cut board while feeding it. However, what happens is the feed roller sticks up on one side, almost imperceptibly, often causing just the front feed roller to bind. If you were to remove the drive chains you will often find the front roller tight as it should spin with just finger pressure without the chain.

When it binds, the gear drive has plenty of torque, so much so that it creates a loud knocking or popping sound as it forces the chains to jump teeth or the roller to jump sporadically.

Often to get the little planer to quiet down is taking the Allen head retainer bolts loose on the bottom of the bearing blocks. Don’t remove the bolts just loosen them. Lube it up with graphite, work the rollers free with a wooden hammer handle, once loose, tighten the bolts back up and bingo…sound gone.

During that little exercise it is also a good time to inspect the drive chains and gears for excessive wear.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8283 posts in 3116 days


#12 posted 05-02-2020 06:03 PM

Often to get the little planer to quiet down is taking the Allen head retainer bolts loose on the bottom of the bearing blocks. Don t remove the bolts just loosen them. Lube it up with graphite, work the rollers free with a wooden hammer handle, once loose, tighten the bolts back up and bingo…sound gone.

During that little exercise it is also a good time to inspect the drive chains and gears for excessive wear.

- IndianaMark

Don’t forget to lube the bearings while you have things apart! Those bearings are a wear item and keeping them lubed will prevent damage. Easy to do once you have things apart.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View scottmi's profile

scottmi

4 posts in 32 days


#13 posted 10-31-2020 07:14 PM



Often to get the little planer to quiet down is taking the Allen head retainer bolts loose on the bottom of the bearing blocks. Don t remove the bolts just loosen them. Lube it up with graphite, work the rollers free with a wooden hammer handle, once loose, tighten the bolts back up and bingo…sound gone.
- IndianaMark

I will try this easing of the block bearing keepers…! The 22-540 i’ve been using is noisy as all get out when not under load. I suspect bearings on the cutter head or the sealed bearing (part list # 22) with the gearbox need replacing, but this is certainly an easier “fix.” thx!

As these parts are getting harder to find (sprokets, bearing blocks, bearings) I also want to point out that the Porter Cable 305TP and a couple Dewalt TPs are identical copies of this trusty 22-540, even with the same part numbers in their manuals. Often these are listed as available when the “Delta” part is listed as ‘discontinued.’

Also, seeking the dimensions for the gearbox bearing (part list #22). Does anyone have that handy?

The cutter head bearings are I.D. 17mm, O.D. 40mm, Width 12mm. Here is a listed replacement from Superior Electric

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8283 posts in 3116 days


#14 posted 10-31-2020 08:04 PM

Also, seeking the dimensions for the gearbox bearing (part list #22). Does anyone have that handy?

From what I can tell, they are standard 6002’s. But as always, it’s best to yank and measure to make sure of what you have before ordering.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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