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Pink studs at Lowes

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Forum topic by willhime posted 06-23-2022 05:59 PM 729 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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willhime

220 posts in 3031 days


06-23-2022 05:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question resource tip trick

Maybe I’m not a good internet sleuth but I can’t seem to find any information on the pink studs at lowes.

Is there a reason they’re cheap ? And is the pink a caustic chemical like pressure treated wood ?

-- Burn your fire for no witness


29 replies so far

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JCamp

1790 posts in 2042 days


#1 posted 06-23-2022 06:21 PM

Are they pink or heart wood?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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pottz

26546 posts in 2476 days


#2 posted 06-23-2022 06:31 PM

i believe it’s a fire retardant or possibly a type of pressure treating.but if that were the case id think they would cost more ?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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JCamp

1790 posts in 2042 days


#3 posted 06-23-2022 06:45 PM

I’ve never seen true “pink” studs at Lowe’s but I avoid that place as much as possible. I have seen a lot of pinkish and red studs that are cut from the heart of trees. Assuming that’s not what you are talking about I found this online “ That pink preservative protects the lumber against fire, mold, fungus and rot.”. Like already said though I’d think that would make it more expensive not cheaper.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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splintergroup

7118 posts in 2714 days


#4 posted 06-23-2022 07:34 PM

When a company like Lowes has a bundle of wood sitting on a shelf, still dripping moisture after being “kiln dried”, it’s probably prudent to apply a rot preventer/fungicide so your inventory doesn’t turn to trash before you can sell it. 8^)

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TravisH

800 posts in 3427 days


#5 posted 06-23-2022 08:08 PM

I think they technically are purple and have heard it was a marketing angle to differentiate their product kiln dried southern yellow pine and heard they were precut for wall framing? Reported as stainable and paintable and they aren’t treated. I don’t think they sold very well and probably trying to get rid of them. At one time the Lowe’s website had photo showing the previous (purple color) and the new none dyed product.

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CaptainKlutz

5736 posts in 2986 days


#6 posted 06-23-2022 08:14 PM

Interesting question?
DuckDuckGo uncovered some misc info with a possible explanations:

Marketing: https://www.hansenpolebuildings.com/2013/01/2x4-studs/

Flame retardant: https://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/lumber-boards/dimensional-lumber/2-x-4-fire-retardant-interior/1141010/p-1444422266658.htm

Mike Holmes: Pinkwood (a Canadian product out of western Canada) which is coated with a pink fire retardant coating designed to produce an endothermic (heat absorbing) reaction when exposed to flames.

Watching to learn Lowes reason…..

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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1thumb

724 posts in 3648 days


#7 posted 06-23-2022 09:02 PM

I think they’re Spruce

-- WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH --

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xedos

558 posts in 792 days


#8 posted 06-24-2022 01:21 AM



I’ve never seen true “pink” studs at Lowe’s but I avoid that place as much as possible. I have seen a lot of pinkish and red studs that are cut from the heart of trees. Assuming that’s not what you are talking about I found this online “ That pink preservative protects the lumber against fire, mold, fungus and rot.”. Like already said though I’d think that would make it more expensive not cheaper.

- JCamp

I think it’s all got to do with your region.

Here in the ATL , Lowes has pretty darn good framing lumber. Better and more consistent than pretty much all of the locally owned contractor suppliers. Some of which have been here over a hundred years.

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willhime

220 posts in 3031 days


#9 posted 06-24-2022 02:30 AM

Yeah, they’re definitely for framing. They have a weird length- 92 5/8 or something like that.
I saw them on Scott brown carpentry channel on YouTube. He’s a kiwi so I figured it was specific to that region till I saw them at lowes.
I wanted to ask an employee but didn’t because that usually results in me standing there while they look up stuff on the internet on their phone, or following them around the store for 20 mins as they ask random employees who also shrug their shoulders.

-- Burn your fire for no witness

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1thumb

724 posts in 3648 days


#10 posted 06-24-2022 12:54 PM


Yeah, they’re definitely for framing. They have a weird length- 92 5/8 or something like that.

- willhime


Pre-cuts:

‘By using pre-cut 92-5/8″ long studs the framed wall height ends up being 97-1/8″:

(2) top plates for a thickness of 3″
92-5/8″ stud length
(1) bottom plate for a thickness of 1-1/2″
TOTAL wall height = 97-1/8″
So I’m sure the question is why does 97-1/8″ wall height make sense when you’re trying to get an 8′ ceiling height right? Well there’s more math at play here as the house is “finished”

Once typical 1/2″ drywall is installed to the ceiling the overall ceiling height drops from 97-1/8″ down to 96-5/8″.’

I had said Spruce, but I believe they are Doug fir which us east of the Mississippi dont see much of. Might look pink to some of us

-- WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH --

View SMP's profile

SMP

5383 posts in 1397 days


#11 posted 06-24-2022 01:16 PM


Yeah, they’re definitely for framing. They have a weird length- 92 5/8 or something like that.

- willhime

Pre-cuts:

By using pre-cut 92-5/8″ long studs the framed wall height ends up being 97-1/8″:

(2) top plates for a thickness of 3″
92-5/8″ stud length
(1) bottom plate for a thickness of 1-1/2″
TOTAL wall height = 97-1/8″
So I’m sure the question is why does 97-1/8″ wall height make sense when you’re trying to get an 8′ ceiling height right? Well there’s more math at play here as the house is “finished”

Once typical 1/2″ drywall is installed to the ceiling the overall ceiling height drops from 97-1/8″ down to 96-5/8″.

- 1thumb

8 ft is 96”
96-5/8 =/= 96”

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1thumb

724 posts in 3648 days


#12 posted 06-24-2022 01:20 PM


Yeah, they’re definitely for framing. They have a weird length- 92 5/8 or something like that.

- willhime

Pre-cuts:

By using pre-cut 92-5/8″ long studs the framed wall height ends up being 97-1/8″:

(2) top plates for a thickness of 3″
92-5/8″ stud length
(1) bottom plate for a thickness of 1-1/2″
TOTAL wall height = 97-1/8″
So I’m sure the question is why does 97-1/8″ wall height make sense when you’re trying to get an 8′ ceiling height right? Well there’s more math at play here as the house is “finished”

Once typical 1/2″ drywall is installed to the ceiling the overall ceiling height drops from 97-1/8″ down to 96-5/8″.

- 1thumb

8 ft is 96”
96-5/8 =/= 96”

- SMP


You walk around on the subfloor or carpet, hardwood, tile, etc,?

-- WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH --

View LumberJockMan's profile

LumberJockMan

43 posts in 291 days


#13 posted 06-24-2022 01:23 PM


Yeah, they’re definitely for framing. They have a weird length- 92 5/8 or something like that.

- willhime

Pre-cuts:

By using pre-cut 92-5/8″ long studs the framed wall height ends up being 97-1/8″:

(2) top plates for a thickness of 3″
92-5/8″ stud length
(1) bottom plate for a thickness of 1-1/2″
TOTAL wall height = 97-1/8″
So I’m sure the question is why does 97-1/8″ wall height make sense when you’re trying to get an 8′ ceiling height right? Well there’s more math at play here as the house is “finished”

Once typical 1/2″ drywall is installed to the ceiling the overall ceiling height drops from 97-1/8″ down to 96-5/8″.

- 1thumb

8 ft is 96”
96-5/8 =/= 96”

- SMP

I am not an expert, but when you hang drywall, you usually put up the top piece horizontally first, so now the top 4’ of the wall is covered. Then you put the bottom piece on to cover the lower half. You want slightly more than 4’ of space on the bottom so that you can fit a wonderbar or something underneath the piece of drywall to lift it.
If the wall space was exactly 8’, it would be a tight fit to get that bottom piece of drywall in.. there might even be cases where you’d have to “rip” a strip off the bottom to get it to fit. Thus, you need the extra space. That small gap on the bottom is covered with baseboard,

View SMP's profile

SMP

5383 posts in 1397 days


#14 posted 06-24-2022 02:23 PM


Yeah, they’re definitely for framing. They have a weird length- 92 5/8 or something like that.

- willhime

Pre-cuts:

By using pre-cut 92-5/8″ long studs the framed wall height ends up being 97-1/8″:

(2) top plates for a thickness of 3″
92-5/8″ stud length
(1) bottom plate for a thickness of 1-1/2″
TOTAL wall height = 97-1/8″
So I’m sure the question is why does 97-1/8″ wall height make sense when you’re trying to get an 8′ ceiling height right? Well there’s more math at play here as the house is “finished”

Once typical 1/2″ drywall is installed to the ceiling the overall ceiling height drops from 97-1/8″ down to 96-5/8″.

- 1thumb

8 ft is 96”
96-5/8 =/= 96”

- SMP

You walk around on the subfloor or carpet, hardwood, tile, etc,?

- 1thumb

Understood, and al floor materials are different sizes, stained concrete being 0”, wood being various thicknesses, tiles being various thicknesses plus various thicknesses of thinset etc, so the math cannot be accurate.

View SMP's profile

SMP

5383 posts in 1397 days


#15 posted 06-24-2022 02:24 PM


I am not an expert, but when you hang drywall, you usually put up the top piece horizontally first, so now the top 4 of the wall is covered. Then you put the bottom piece on to cover the lower half. You want slightly more than 4 of space on the bottom so that you can fit a wonderbar or something underneath the piece of drywall to lift it.
If the wall space was exactly 8 , it would be a tight fit to get that bottom piece of drywall in.. there might even be cases where you d have to “rip” a strip off the bottom to get it to fit. Thus, you need the extra space. That small gap on the bottom is covered with baseboard,

- LumberJockMan

This makes sense, just a buffer to allow the drywallers to work.

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