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How to get this broke pipe out (w pic)

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Forum topic by bradleyheathhays posted 06-23-2022 04:18 AM 613 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bradleyheathhays

50 posts in 515 days


06-23-2022 04:18 AM

So my ladder falls and hits the (cheap) aftermarket regulator I have attached to my compressor and breaks the (accompanying cheap) connection pipe off flush with the compressor component leaving about 1/3” of threaded pipe inside the compressor component itself. If it would’ve broken on the regulator side I could just remove the rest of the pipe and replace the whole thing. But as it stands I’m gonna have to work the last bit of this male pipe out of the female threads. The pipe is copper so maybe that’ll end up being to my advantage. How would you go about removing something like this? My camera takes bad close ups but to give some perspective the I.D. of the pipe is .40 in. Drew that line in there to show the end of the pipe.

I’ve got easy outs for rounded nuts but I’m not sure if there’s anything like that for this situation. Can’t be the first time it’s happened to someone.

I’m afraid the pipe is in there fairly snug so I don’t think prying one side up with a pic and then trying to work it around with some needle nose pliers is gonna get any kind of result.

I’m all ears. Thanks.

-- 'If the end of the world ever comes move to Kentucky, because everything there happens twenty years later.' ~ Mark Twain


18 replies so far

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MrUnix

9044 posts in 3691 days


#1 posted 06-23-2022 04:25 AM

Get a small punch and push one side of the copper tube in enough so you can get some needle nose pliers on it. Another alternative would be to cut (slit) the pipe lengthwise, using something like a small x-acto blade or similar, if you can get it to fit in there. Once slit, you can peel it out with a small screwdriver.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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bradleyheathhays

50 posts in 515 days


#2 posted 06-23-2022 04:41 AM

Thanks for the advice MrUnix. I went ahead and edited my OP as I forgot to mention how tight the pipe is in there. I think your idea of cutting a slit and then prying it out from there is the best I’ve heard so far.

-- 'If the end of the world ever comes move to Kentucky, because everything there happens twenty years later.' ~ Mark Twain

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robscastle

8617 posts in 3696 days


#3 posted 06-23-2022 06:09 AM

Just a sec, ... I will try another pair of glasses!

-- Regards Rob

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987Ron

4136 posts in 808 days


#4 posted 06-23-2022 12:26 PM

EZ out might work.

-- Ron

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Fred Hargis

7503 posts in 3985 days


#5 posted 06-23-2022 12:32 PM

There are internal pipe wrenches, you might try one. I think they are made for other-than-copper pipe, but it still might work and they aren’t too expensive.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Axis39

629 posts in 1089 days


#6 posted 06-23-2022 01:05 PM

What size is it?

They make a tool for sprinkler maintenance, it’s a little t-hanlde with a tapered end, that has teeth on it. It is used for pulling plastic pipe out of a situation just like this. Might have enough grip to grab the inside the copper?

I know the one I bought last year has a 1/2 and a 3/4 ends.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Axis39

629 posts in 1089 days


#7 posted 06-23-2022 01:06 PM

Here’s one on Amazon

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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OnhillWW

344 posts in 2724 days


#8 posted 06-23-2022 01:06 PM

I have had to deal with that type of problem many times, the technique MrUnix described is right on. Be careful that you do not mess up the threads, you will feel the blade hitting the threads if you pay attention. I always took a wedge out, i.e. two close cuts rather than one and wider at the front than at the back. Take a fine punch and peel the wedge out, it will break free even if the material in the valley of the threads remains.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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OnhillWW

344 posts in 2724 days


#9 posted 06-23-2022 01:09 PM

I have had to deal with that type of problem many times, the technique MrUnix described is right on. Be careful that you do not mess up the threads, you will feel the blade hitting the threads if you pay attention. I always took a wedge out, i.e. two close cuts rather than one and wider at the front than at the back. Take a fine punch and peel the wedge out, it will break free even if the material in the valley of the threads remains. BTW, never had any luck with internal extractors on thin walled or soft metal, they push outwardly to get the “bite” needed and that works against you.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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ManySplinters

47 posts in 271 days


#10 posted 06-23-2022 01:14 PM

A little heat from a heat gun (not a torch) and use a sharp punch to drift it out (un-screw it). Keep the punch at the steepest angle you can get of course just an 1/8” inside the lip or maybe less and tap tap tap… Have drifted many broke bolts back out using this method.

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ManySplinters

47 posts in 271 days


#11 posted 06-23-2022 01:19 PM



Get a small punch and push one side of the copper tube in enough so you can get some needle nose pliers on it. Another alternative would be to cut (slit) the pipe lengthwise, using something like a small x-acto blade or similar, if you can get it to fit in there. Once slit, you can peel it out with a small screwdriver.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Yep, this has also worked well for me in the past. Never have had an easy-out work easy though…

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

3016 posts in 4285 days


#12 posted 06-23-2022 02:25 PM

.the internal pipe wrenches work for this. Pictured is a 1/2”. They are size specific, so you need the matching size.

Before I got these, I would use a drill that just fits inside the threads and drill out the inner part of the pipe, and the threads would unwind out of the female threads.

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jwoodcraft

23 posts in 6 days


#13 posted 06-23-2022 03:08 PM

You could try grinding/filing slots and pounding in a large flat-blade screwdriver, using a wrench to turn it.
Give it a shot with a torch first.

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Foghorn

1530 posts in 878 days


#14 posted 06-23-2022 03:24 PM

I’ve used an appropriately sized file in the past. Find one where the tapered end of the file fits the inside of the pipe. Tap it in and then use an adjustable wrench to turn the broken piece out.

-- Darrel

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HowardAppel

165 posts in 4526 days


#15 posted 06-23-2022 08:55 PM

Easy peasy—buy a new compressor.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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