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T-9 for Bearing Lube

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Forum topic by Lee Ohmart posted 05-24-2022 06:04 PM 331 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Ohmart

13 posts in 887 days


05-24-2022 06:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router

I’ve read through a few forum topics on lubing bit bearings with oil. It seems like everyone has a favorite substance from 3-in-1 to various oils made specifically for bearings. It just so happens that I have a can of T-9 that will not squirt. When I called PMS Products they suggested soaking in in hot water and then shipped me a brand-new can. Kudos to them, BTW, for that. The hot water soak was only temporarily helpful so when I ran into this lube issue, it occurred to me that I might paunch the can, drain the contents and use it in an applicator bottle as a lube. Do you suppose that there is any reason not to use T-9 as a bit lube?


9 replies so far

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HokieKen

21999 posts in 2630 days


#1 posted 05-24-2022 06:27 PM

T-9 isn’t primarily a lubricant but it does have paraffin wax so it will serve as a light lubricant. I’m not sure how effective it would be as a bearing lubricant though. Paraffin will liquefy at fairly low temperatures so the speed of a router bit would likely cause it to do so.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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Lazyman

9759 posts in 2879 days


#2 posted 05-24-2022 07:34 PM

When I tried T-9 to protect my cast iron table on my band saw it dried to a thick soft finish which I didn’t like. I don’t think that you want to use something that dries thick like that as a lubricant, especially for a bearing. A lubricant that dries won’t be very effective.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Lee Ohmart

13 posts in 887 days


#3 posted 05-25-2022 01:08 AM

Thanks for the quick replies. Bugger! I was hoping to find a use for this can of T-9 thinking of how I use a wax lube on my bicycle chain, a very different type of lube situation I admit. I found a few engineering papers that discussed waxes in bearings but, I admit, most of it flew high above my head. As for the use of T-p on cast-iron tabletops, I swear by it on mine. I don’t allow it to dry after spraying it on. After letting it sit for just a few minutes, I wipe off the excess with a paper towel and then use a second paper towel to polish the surface. I find that it leaves a nice, slippery surface with none being deposited as wood travels over the surface.

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Lazyman

9759 posts in 2879 days


#4 posted 05-25-2022 01:57 AM

LOL, maybe it will work on your bike chain. It is more for rust protection than for lubrication. If you like how it works on your cast iron you can always just pour or wipe it on with a rag.

I use a paste wax on my cast iron. I just didn’t like the T9. It takes much longer to dry and it looked and felt like I could scrape it off, almost like a film finish. IIRC, I think that they recommend waiting 2 hours at least for it to soak in and dry and overnight is better. The paste wax can be buffed off in minutes as soon as it hazes over and you are ready to go. I guess it just boils down to it was just not an improvement over the paste wax.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Lazyman

9759 posts in 2879 days


#5 posted 05-25-2022 01:58 AM

Dup

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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MrRon

6333 posts in 4735 days


#6 posted 05-25-2022 06:59 AM

There is an oil that is used on clothes dryers called turbine oil. I know it’s expensive and don’t know where to get it. Call Sears or a washer/dryer repair place and ask them. I had some turbine oil I got from a repairman. It is a highly refined oil used in places where there is heat. A router bit bearing meets that criterion. Hydraulic oil may also work.

View Lee Ohmart's profile

Lee Ohmart

13 posts in 887 days


#7 posted 05-25-2022 12:37 PM

MrRon, thank you. It just so happens I may have some of that turbine oil. Many years ago, a furnace repairman left behind a plastic bottle of oil with a long nozzle that could be pulled out which I suppose would allow the user to apply it to tight places. I know it’s somewhere in my shop. The search begins after morning coffee. Wish me luck.

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AlanWS

220 posts in 5050 days


#8 posted 05-25-2022 02:01 PM

I agree that T9 is best used as a rust preventer rather than a lubricant. My approach is to use it on fresh cast iron surfaces, thinking their porosity provides a place where rust gets started, and the T9 can get into the pores to prevent that. Once the T9 dries and is buffed out it is effective as a rust preventer, but not so great as a way to make a surface slick. I use a harder wax on top for tablesaw, jointer, and bandsaw tables for instance. If the surface is not clean, for instance if you sweat on it and there is salt in the pores, the T9 will be less effective at preventing rust.

Without the solvent, you might need heat to get it to soak in. I might keep the can without propellant for that use.

-- Alan in Wisconsin

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Lee Ohmart

13 posts in 887 days


#9 posted 05-25-2022 03:00 PM

Score! Found the turbine oil.

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