LumberJocks

Wax

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Dale posted 05-19-2022 08:02 PM 414 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Dale 's profile

Dale

417 posts in 4674 days


05-19-2022 08:02 PM

How long after the last coat of Poly should I wait before applying wax. In this case Howards Feed-N- Wax.

-- Dale West Central Pa. Do it all, before last call.


8 replies so far

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

678 posts in 4107 days


#1 posted 05-19-2022 08:33 PM

I would take the cure time from the manufacturer of the finish and add another 50%...but most of my projects are for me…so I’m not often selling my work

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View LesB's profile

LesB

3503 posts in 4937 days


#2 posted 05-19-2022 08:59 PM

It will vary with ambient temperature and humidity. For water based I usually wait 10 to 15 days. For solvent based 5 to 10 days should work.

So I have used water based in small boxes and every time I open the box for up to 6 months after I detect the odor from the finish.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

9779 posts in 2881 days


#3 posted 05-19-2022 10:27 PM

IMO, Howards F&W is not the best option. A paste wax is better on furniture because it dries to a harder finish. Howards F&W is more for refreshing an old dry finish and the orange oil will just sit on the surface until it eventually dries or you wipe it off.

Frankly, wax is probably not necessary at all on poly. Most of the time, wax is used to protect a finish that does not offer much protection against water or to freshen one that has lost its sheen. Wax doesn’t really add any extra protection to the the poly and may actually tone down the sheen of the poly too. If you do apply a paste wax, I would wait until what the label says you can put it into full serves when it is fully cured.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

5750 posts in 2988 days


#4 posted 05-19-2022 11:21 PM

I treat polyurethane on furniture like fresh paint on car repair.
No wax on the finish for at least 30 days to let finish breath while completing the curing process.

+1 Wax on Poly is not needed and usually overkill, unless the furniture surfaces are used/touched daily.
Even when wax would offer some additional ‘dirty hand’ protection; I tell the owner of the newly finished furniture, DO NOT wax it for at least a month.

All of which means; I never wax poly finished furniture before it leaves shop.
YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View sunnybob's profile

sunnybob

152 posts in 259 days


#5 posted 05-20-2022 01:01 AM

Polyurethane is an impervious layer. Any finish over the top wont get into the wood and therefore wont last very long if its being handled. My boxes are either wipe on poly, or wax, but both have a shellac base..

-- my projects can be seen at www.pbase.com/sunnybob

View gdaveg's profile

gdaveg

561 posts in 696 days


#6 posted 05-20-2022 01:09 AM

+1 on 30 days. It does give a better feel to poly, definitely love the feel of wax over lacquer, I go 30 days min over lacquer also.

-- Dave, Vancouver, WA & Tucson, AZ

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

3162 posts in 3469 days


#7 posted 05-20-2022 01:55 AM

Most water borne polyurethanes will have a 90% cure in less than 7 days. Some as little as 3 days. Most solvent base polyurethane will have 90% cure in about 30 days. I recommend that you find these cure rates for whatever product you are using and follow their stated cure times.

-- Paul, Duvall, WA

View LesB's profile

LesB

3503 posts in 4937 days


#8 posted 05-21-2022 12:08 AM

I agree with those who say poly doesn’t need wax but I find I can get a better feel to the surface by applying the paste wax with a 3M white pad and hand buffing. It helps remove any dust particles. I have heard the human finger can detect 1/10,000 of an inch difference in a surface.

-- Les B, Oregon

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com