LumberJocks

Some job site saw blade advice

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by kdeboy posted 05-18-2022 08:08 PM 324 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View kdeboy's profile

kdeboy

24 posts in 2314 days


05-18-2022 08:08 PM

I’ve never really liked my job site saw. Didn’t cut plywood that well, same with dimensional construction lumber so it’s basically been collecting dust in my garage for the last 4 or 5 years. Today I needed to trim a glued up chunk of red oak for a Moxon vise I’m making so I drug the saw out to my patio. HORRIBLE. Got about halfway through the cut and the piece got stuck. Checked blade and fence alignment, they were good so wth???

Spent a couple hours reading through saw blade reviews. Lots of good info but I’m impatient so I went to HD and got an inexpensive Diablo 24T rip blade and stuck it in. Night and day, went through the wood like butter. Didn’t even feel any resistance while cutting. So my advise on job site saws, at least if it’s a Bosch 4100, is replace the blade it comes with as soon as possible. $30 and it turned mine into something that I never used b/c it was no fun into something that was actually enjoyable to use. The dark side is from the attempted cut with the barely used factory blade, the light side is the same piece of wood with the Diablo blade cut.

-- Ken Deboy, http://www.deboy.org


4 replies so far

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3862 posts in 1091 days


#1 posted 05-18-2022 08:50 PM

A good blade is well worth the money and if you want to splurge get a good dedicated rip blade too.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2403 posts in 3139 days


#2 posted 05-18-2022 10:53 PM

A job-site is one of the places a thin kerf combo blade is OK. Won’t work quite as well ripping that oak you show as the rip blade you got, but “convenient” For framing, the rip does a better job of crosscut than a crosscut does in rip. If you are doing trim, might think about a combo blade. Or do you just use a miter saw for crosscuts, in which ripping or chewing rough through plywood, rip is a good choice on the TS.

Diablo for throw away, CMT for my go-to. My preference.

View Robert's profile

Robert

5005 posts in 2970 days


#3 posted 05-19-2022 10:47 AM


A job-site is one of the places a thin kerf combo blade is OK. Won t work quite as well ripping that oak you show as the rip blade you got, but “convenient” For framing, the rip does a better job of crosscut than a crosscut does in rip. If you are doing trim, might think about a combo blade. Or do you just use a miter saw for crosscuts, in which ripping or chewing rough through plywood, rip is a good choice on the TS.

Diablo for throw away, CMT for my go-to. My preference.

- tvrgeek

+1 on all of this ^^. The commercial Freud blades are worth sharpening.

You’ve GOT to keep a sharp blade on a low power machine.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8439 posts in 4865 days


#4 posted 05-19-2022 01:07 PM

That Diable 24T is a decent value blade and should reduce burning compared to most. Keep it clean. Good blade and fence alignment is also key.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com