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Is this safe to use on a tablesaw?

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Forum topic by Jimothy posted 05-10-2022 03:28 AM 934 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jimothy

137 posts in 2439 days


05-10-2022 03:28 AM

Hey, I found these deep in the garage. My grandfather did woodworking so I acquired a lot of stuff. It does fit your normal 5/8 arbor like all my blades, but it seems a bit heavy? I don’t know.

Also, it seems like the various cutters are held in by tightening allen keys/wrenches. It seems like something that could belong to a shaper, or something.

my main interest would be using some of the flat knives for dados

thanks!


13 replies so far

View RDan's profile

RDan

222 posts in 3823 days


#1 posted 05-10-2022 03:34 AM

They look like molding knives. Unless you have a molder they fit in, I would not try them on a table saw. The other possibility is a plane molder of some sort. They look a little wide for a hand plane though. Dan

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Jimothy

137 posts in 2439 days


#2 posted 05-10-2022 03:57 AM



They look like molding knives. Unless you have a molder they fit in, I would not try them on a table saw. The other possibility is a plane molder of some sort. They look a little wide for a hand plane though. Dan

- RDan

the knives in the first picture definitely dont seem to be for a hand plane, they fit into the thing in the second pic

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MrUnix

9049 posts in 3698 days


#3 posted 05-10-2022 04:21 AM

That is a molding head designed to be used on a table saw or radial arm saw. Can’t really tell about the knives based on that picture, but they seem to be for a different head – got any better pictures? Those heads are pretty rough on a table saw, and many can’t use them – so unless you have a fairly substantial machine, you would probably be better off just getting a standard dado set.

Clean up the head and let us know what the markings on it are. I know that Craftsman had a head similar, as did Delta. Figure out who made it and you can get more info on it.

Edit: Here is a shot by fellow LJ Dusty56 showing some variations on the Delta molding head and appropriate cutters for them (Found in this thread):

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Jimothy

137 posts in 2439 days


#4 posted 05-10-2022 04:30 AM



That is a molding head designed to be used on a table saw or radial arm saw. Can t really tell about the knives based on that picture, but I assume that is what they are for. They are pretty rough on a table saw, and many can t use them – so unless you have a fairly substantial machine, you would probably be better off just getting a standard dado set.

Clean up the head and let us know what the markings on it are. I know that Craftsman had a head similar, as did Delta. Figure out who made it and you can get more info on it.

Edit: Here is a shot by fellow LJ Dusty56 showing some variations on the Delta molding head and appropriate cutters for them (Found in this thread):

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Oh very cool! I can see tomrrow what it says on it. Glad to know it can go in the saw and not fly off and behead me

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6877 posts in 3808 days


#5 posted 05-10-2022 04:50 AM

Long ago I used to use a Craftsman molding head cutter similar to that on a 3hp Delta unisaw. No problem.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Woodmaster1

1994 posts in 4086 days


#6 posted 05-10-2022 06:04 AM

If you use them make a throat plate as zero clearance as possible. The wood has a tendency to drop at the end if your not careful.

View mikey78's profile

mikey78

39 posts in 2007 days


#7 posted 05-10-2022 07:43 AM

Hello jimothy !!!
Cutters in the first picture are from a Stanley 45 combination handplane,
and yes you can use them for cutting a dado …
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLa0RxQ9rf4

View RClark's profile

RClark

291 posts in 3684 days


#8 posted 05-10-2022 11:21 AM

I had a Craftsman molding head cutter that I inherited from my father. I used it once on my old Delta contractor saw.

I really didn’t have good luck with it; it left rough cuts and controlling the work piece was difficult unless taking very light passes.

Simply wasn’t worth the hassle for me.

-- Ray

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

1306 posts in 1701 days


#9 posted 05-10-2022 12:38 PM

had the craftsman for years, its got a lotta miles on it, nice for what it was, shapers better, but you use what ya got, infact my front door an old buddy and i built is made with the t & g cutters, quick and easy once set up.
good luck
rj in az

-- Living the dream

View LesB's profile

LesB

3510 posts in 4942 days


#10 posted 05-10-2022 03:54 PM

I have used them many times. You can even grind the cutters to make your own pattern but that works best on the cutter head that only holds one blade…..yes there two types, 3 bladed and a single. A close fitting throat plate is a good safety measure. They make a scary sound because they are pushing a lot of air around.

On harder wood it is best to make multiple passes to get to the finished depth. Feather boards are a big help in using these. They are a great substitute for a shaper and with adjustments you can even shape wide boards just be aware of how the board is supported on the table as you move the fence over for additional cuts. I usually leave a 1/4” blank edge on both sides of the board to support it and cut it off later if needed.

-- Les B, Oregon

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

5177 posts in 5234 days


#11 posted 05-10-2022 06:07 PM

Here’s my piece, a “Reyco” from Vancouver, BC Canada.

I spent a few years, ages ago, in an old mill known as “Gregg and Son” Millwork. Their main product was upscale kitchens, back when you bought a kitchen and installed it as a built-in. Then, Triangle Pacific bought the place and shifted the focus away from one-off kitchens, to discrete pre-built cabinets to be hung on your kitchen walls.

We had to deal with disgruntled old-timers who no longer got tapped for fancy hand work, and were stuck behind production machinery all day. However, when asked, they would gladly show off their old shrapnel wounds from busted shaper cutters hurled around the room. most of them over the course of their earlier career had at one time or another took a carbide chunk to the gut.

That’s why I never used my 3-wing shaper head on my table saw. Cripes the old shapers would only hit you at gut level, worse yet a vertical cutter head that could get you right between the eyes.

Keep your shaper head as a curiosity, and get a compliment of vintage molding planes and a Stanley #45 or equivalent. You’ll be ahead in the long run!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View AMZ's profile

AMZ

407 posts in 889 days


#12 posted 05-10-2022 10:21 PM

I have a set inherited from dear old departed dad (2004). I’ve used them on my Unisaw with a shop made throat plate. Use care.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1686 posts in 3999 days


#13 posted 05-12-2022 08:12 AM

If they are not made anymore, there might be a good reason.


That s why I never used my 3-wing shaper head on my table saw. Cripes the old shapers would only hit you at gut level, worse yet a vertical cutter head that could get you right between the eyes.

Keep your shaper head as a curiosity, and get a compliment of vintage molding planes and a Stanley #45 or equivalent. You ll be ahead in the long run!

- poopiekat

more dangerous than a dado stack (not authorised in Europe) with the added risk of of flying cutter.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn (and that is nice)

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