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Drum sanders that go as low as 2mm

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Forum topic by Loren posted 05-04-2022 08:46 PM 622 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Loren

11549 posts in 5137 days


05-04-2022 08:46 PM

I’m thinking of buying another drum sander for making guitars but I’ve noticed some of them are rated to only go to 1/4” and I need less than 1/8”. Any suggestions?


18 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

5725 posts in 2984 days


#1 posted 05-04-2022 09:12 PM

Have never heard of a veneer sander that uses a drum head. Have read where hobbyist use a carrier board to overcome thickness limitation, and provide needed support for the thin veneer; on a drum sander. Never needed one, so can not help with references.

In commercial operation, veneer is sanded using a wide belt sander, outfit with special veneer platen. The platens are located under each belt head to produce desired results. They are pneumatic or hydraulically controlled for thickness, with extra optical and physical sensors to ensure proper material handling. A veneer sander has such precise control, it is often used to sand down vinyl sealer coats on panels, and/or finish sand top coat on pre-finished plywood. Timesavers and Stiles are example companies that produce sanders with veneer capability if you want more information.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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therealSteveN

10167 posts in 2063 days


#2 posted 05-04-2022 09:24 PM

+ 1, carrier board. I use one sometimes with my 19/38, works fairly well.

Depending on species, or maybe grain types you’ll get some that wants to crinkle as it passes through.

I’ve found if you sand the stock through BEFORE resawing it to give it a very flat/smooth surface, and then once resawn you send it back through with 220 or so grit you’ll get less crinkling pieces.

-- Think safe, be safe

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

7112 posts in 2712 days


#3 posted 05-04-2022 09:43 PM

I’ll often go to 1/8” and even down to 1/16” on my old 16/32 with a sled. I can go thinner but then the wood sometimes fractures.

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AMZ

406 posts in 879 days


#4 posted 05-04-2022 09:47 PM

I’ve gone down to 1/8”, but with extreme caution to not damage what’s being sanded! I would use a carrier board.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8820 posts in 4287 days


#5 posted 05-05-2022 12:46 AM

I’ve sanded to 1/16” lots of times with both my double drum sander and my shop made ShopSmith drum sander using a carrier board with a cleat to stop the veneer from sliding on it.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Loren's profile

Loren

11549 posts in 5137 days


#6 posted 05-05-2022 05:47 PM

Thanks for the input.

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Madmark2

3480 posts in 2078 days


#7 posted 05-05-2022 06:00 PM

MicroMark makes a thinnessing sander that will go to zero. it’s hand fed but gives excellent results with a steady hand. my old shopmate used to routinely go down to .1” or 1/16” in jatoba and build with it.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Foghorn

1528 posts in 876 days


#8 posted 05-05-2022 07:38 PM



MicroMark makes a thinnessing sander that will go to zero. it s hand fed but gives excellent results with a steady hand. my old shopmate used to routinely go down to .1” or 1/16” in jatoba and build with it.

- Madmark2


It’ll work for sides but not for tops and backs.

-- Darrel

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1987 posts in 4076 days


#9 posted 05-05-2022 11:44 PM

My supermax 16/32 will go that thin. I use it to make bands for shaker oval boxes. I have gone below .07 on some bands.

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

461 posts in 2665 days


#10 posted 05-09-2022 06:51 PM

I used square tubing to raise the bed on my 16-32 for this purpose. Going that thin on the 16-32 puts too much stress on the end of the threads on the aluminum motor mount. Mine stripped out from constantly lowering that far and I had to replace it. After that I added 1” square tubing under the bed to raise it by an inch. By raising the bed with square tubing, It’s not stressing those threads anymore since they’ve got an inch more “grab”. It’s working out fine so far. As long as you don’t need the extra 1” of clearance you’re taking away (for sanding thicker stock), this could be a good solution for you.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

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splintergroup

7112 posts in 2712 days


#11 posted 05-09-2022 07:14 PM

Just this weekend I needed to go 1/16”, no problems at all. These were 12” x 1” slats.

View Loren's profile

Loren

11549 posts in 5137 days


#12 posted 05-09-2022 07:28 PM


I used square tubing to raise the bed on my 16-32 for this purpose. Going that thin on the 16-32 puts too much stress on the end of the threads on the aluminum motor mount. Mine stripped out from constantly lowering that far and I had to replace it. After that I added 1” square tubing under the bed to raise it by an inch. By raising the bed with square tubing, It s not stressing those threads anymore since they ve got an inch more “grab”. It s working out fine so far. As long as you don t need the extra 1” of clearance you re taking away (for sanding thicker stock), this could be a good solution for you.

- onoitsmatt

That’s really useful to know. Thank you and thank you to everybody who replied. Drum sander sued to be easy to break and hard to get working well back when I got my first one.

I’m looking at the Supermax 16-32. By any chance can you post a photo of your steel tubing arrangement so I can get some ideas of how to approach the mod if I decide to do it?

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Woodmaster1

1987 posts in 4076 days


#13 posted 05-09-2022 10:19 PM



I used square tubing to raise the bed on my 16-32 for this purpose. Going that thin on the 16-32 puts too much stress on the end of the threads on the aluminum motor mount. Mine stripped out from constantly lowering that far and I had to replace it. After that I added 1” square tubing under the bed to raise it by an inch. By raising the bed with square tubing, It s not stressing those threads anymore since they ve got an inch more “grab”. It s working out fine so far. As long as you don t need the extra 1” of clearance you re taking away (for sanding thicker stock), this could be a good solution for you.

- onoitsmatt


Thanks for the suggestion about the tubes. I don’t feel like repairing parts.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

7112 posts in 2712 days


#14 posted 05-10-2022 12:00 AM



I used square tubing to raise the bed on my 16-32 for this purpose. Going that thin on the 16-32 puts too much stress on the end of the threads on the aluminum motor mount. Mine stripped out from constantly lowering that far and I had to replace it. After that I added 1” square tubing under the bed to raise it by an inch. By raising the bed with square tubing, It s not stressing those threads anymore since they ve got an inch more “grab”. It s working out fine so far. As long as you don t need the extra 1” of clearance you re taking away (for sanding thicker stock), this could be a good solution for you.

- onoitsmatt

Hadn’t even considered that, great tip/warning.

Just had a look at my 16/32 and the threads are at the bottom of the threaded hole (100% engagement) when the sander is at about 3/8”. I’ll need to put some PSA 220 grit on a board and use that as a sled for now on to avoid cutting with the thread engagement below 100%

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

461 posts in 2665 days


#15 posted 05-19-2022 02:40 AM

Apologies for the delay on this reply. Here’s a few pictures of the added tubing.

It’s a pretty simple solution and really spares a lot of unnecessary wear on the aluminum threads.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

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