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mitered corner inlay

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Forum topic by willhime posted 01-27-2022 08:29 AM 862 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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willhime

214 posts in 2998 days


01-27-2022 08:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: resource jig tip question trick joining shaping milling router

I’m wanting to cut a dado right on the seam of a mitered corner on a box. The only thing I can think of is making a jig that holds the router at 45 degrees and slides down the corner edge. Maybe with a clamped on fence to stop the router from falling. I hope someone here has a better solution.

-- Burn your fire for no witness


21 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

5613 posts in 2954 days


#1 posted 01-27-2022 09:00 AM

If I wanted to make that joint, would cut 1/2 groove width in each side of miter, BEFORE assembly. Would be simple to use same 45° blade angle and lower blade to make a partial depth cut. Use piece of wood against the fence to move the board out 1/2 width of insert, and adjust the fence once.

To cut that spline after assembly, would build a spline jig that is rotated from normal and clamps on a cross cut sled.

PS – Would be worried using router bit to cut groove in center of a miter joint. The rotation of bit would be always be pushing chips outward, attempting to open the joint. If you encounter a crack or imperfect grain direction creating a large chunk, could blow the joint apart with disastrous outcome. Using a table saw blade seems safer, as it pulls chips down and out of groove with minimal side stress.

As always, YMMV and Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2729 posts in 1186 days


#2 posted 01-27-2022 09:26 AM

I would try using my dado blade on the table saw turned to 45 degrees.

View turnkey47's profile

turnkey47

326 posts in 4151 days


#3 posted 01-27-2022 02:13 PM

when i got my kehoe jig they include a jig called the corner inlayer…this will do exactly what you are describing….maybe you can find someone who has this jig…i’ve had mine 20 yrs. so its not something new…good luck!!!!

View Robert's profile

Robert

4989 posts in 2940 days


#4 posted 01-27-2022 02:25 PM



I would try using my dado blade on the table saw turned to 45 degrees.

- LeeRoyMan

My thought, too.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1550 posts in 2562 days


#5 posted 01-27-2022 03:35 PM


I would try using my dado blade on the table saw turned to 45 degrees.

- LeeRoyMan


The OP doesn’t say how big the box is, but if it is small enough to handle on the table saw, I agree.
However, I think that rather than make a groove at 45 deg, I would cut a rabbet (sides 90 deg to box faces). And, then glue in a triangular decorative piece (or square and shave the 45 after gllue-up). This way, it would be easier to cut and there would be less chance of tear-out. Also, it could be easily cut with a router.

View Davevand's profile

Davevand

337 posts in 2295 days


#6 posted 01-27-2022 04:19 PM

Make a jig similar to a spline cutting jig, just run it in the other direction. Use an up-cut spiral bit with sacrificial boards in front and behind.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2729 posts in 1186 days


#7 posted 01-27-2022 07:36 PM

OK funny story, I usually don’t share how stupid I can be but this was so long ago I think I can.

So, being the inventor kind of guy I am, a figured out a solution to do the same cut above, it was so simple, I couldn’t believe it wasn’t already being done.
I got as far as a napkin drawing up my thoughts before I figured out the problem. It was quite the DA moment for me. I had to keep it around for the laugh.

View budglo's profile

budglo

4 posts in 2110 days


#8 posted 01-27-2022 09:35 PM

A different approach I’ve used to accomplish the same effect.
1) determine the box side length plus 1/2 the diameter of the inlay. This will be the length of the completed box side.
2) with a flat bottom dado on the TS or with an appropriate size bit at the router table, plow a dado, crossgrain, to the proper depth.
3) choose the inlay material of contrasting wood and glue it into the dado. This inlay MUST have the grain direction of the sides.
4) run the board through the planer to level the inlay with the board.
5) at the bandsaw cut the sections down the middle of the inlay.
6) back at the TS, tilt the blade to 45 (for a 4-sided box). Determine the width of the inlay, measure 1/2 the width, draw a vertical line on the piece facing the blade and make the cuts.
7) do the same on the opposite end of each side, this time using a stop block to insure uniformity. The effect, if miters close properly, is a solid strip of inlay.

Don’t know how to post a picture but I recently made a six-sided pot pourrie(sp?) box using this technique and the inlays appear to be solid corner inlays. It’s a time consuming process, but in my opinion, worth the time spent.

Good luck with your project,
Jerry

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1550 posts in 2562 days


#9 posted 01-27-2022 10:31 PM

I’m missing something. That is way more complex and difficult than it needs to be. Why are you cutting a 45 deg dado rather than a simple rabbet that can be simply cut with a rabbeting bit with a bearing guide? Or, if the box is small enough to handle, it can be done on the table saw. See #5 above.

View bc4393's profile

bc4393

117 posts in 2602 days


#10 posted 01-28-2022 05:02 AM

rabbet the corner tablesaw/router. (I use the router table)
glue in a square trim piece
clip the end off with a chamfer router bit

end up with bilyo’s picture.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4989 posts in 2940 days


#11 posted 01-28-2022 11:53 AM

Bilyo has got it.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

9602 posts in 2847 days


#12 posted 01-28-2022 01:26 PM

Thanks for sharing LRM. It is always nice to to see that people smarter than me also have DA moments.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2729 posts in 1186 days


#13 posted 01-28-2022 03:18 PM



Thanks for sharing LRM. It is always nice to to see that people s̶m̶a̶r̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶n̶ ̶m̶e̶ also have DA moments.

- Lazyman

Thanks, that’s not the only one, I could write a book on my DA moments….

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1550 posts in 2562 days


#14 posted 01-28-2022 04:07 PM


Thanks for sharing LRM. It is always nice to to see that people s̶m̶a̶r̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶n̶ ̶m̶e̶ also have DA moments.

- Lazyman

Thanks, that s not the only one, I could write a book on my DA moments….

- LeeRoyMan


Sorry. Because I never have those ;>) and don’t understand them ;>) I missed the humor. Good one.

View LesB's profile

LesB

3471 posts in 4902 days


#15 posted 01-28-2022 05:54 PM



rabbet the corner tablesaw/router. (I use the router table)
glue in a square trim piece
clip the end off with a chamfer router bit

end up with bilyo s picture.

- bc4393

This worked well for me on the table saw when making some hexagon tubes for a kaleidoscope. I made mine a lot deeper because I turned the center part of the shaft round on the lathe so the spline had to go below the round finished diameter.

-- Les B, Oregon

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

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