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Forum topic by m4778 posted 01-25-2022 06:20 PM 671 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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m4778

37 posts in 505 days


01-25-2022 06:20 PM

I found it at an antique shop near me for $80. The tag on it said it’s from 1910, is that accurate? I have no idea if I got ripped off or not for 80 bucks but it seemed all in working order and clean.

This is my first metal hand plane (up until now i’ve been using my grandfathers wood planes). What do I need to look out for buying an old iron plane like this?

I think the pictures don’t do it justice probably because my garage is dark, but besides the tarnish, the sole and all parts appear clean and flat. All the adjustments appear to work, and I took a few shavings without issue… (the iron appears to be fairly sharp and shiny so maybe someone has used it recently?).


15 replies so far

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controlfreak

3747 posts in 1061 days


#1 posted 01-25-2022 06:25 PM

Looks like a winner to me. I would be tempted to do a full rehab on the big boy. I would start by taking it apart and giving the parts a good cleaning. Sometimes the tool is just dirty and after cleaning it turns into a great user. Make sure you keep the rust from finding it.

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Ocelot

3808 posts in 4097 days


#2 posted 01-25-2022 06:32 PM

That’s probably a good deal. It’s hard to say much about it from the photos you posted. We’d need a picture of the area in front of the rear handle (tote). Also, a square-on picture of the sole.

There are 3 spots there that look as if somebody drilled holes in the bottom of it. That wouldn’t seriously affect it’s usefullness, but would make it less valuable to a collector.

Secondly, the blade looks a little short and may not have very much usable steel left. You need to be careful not to get carried away in sharpening Definitely don’t use a power grinder on the blade.

If you remove the lever cap and blade and take some photos, we can tell you more.

Also, there is a white streak on the inside of the left cheek. I’m assuming that’s a paint run, but it coujld also be a crack repair. A photo of the left cheek would help.

And one more… if it’s a 1910 plane it should have what is called a “low knob”. Yours seems to have a “tall knob”, which would be replacement. It might have been replaced because a prevoius user preferred the tall knob or because the original knob was damaged.

And finally, the horn of the tote is broken, but this too is mostly cosmetic and can be fixed. Several of my planes are like that.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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SMP

5312 posts in 1365 days


#3 posted 01-25-2022 06:50 PM

I would say for $80 its a good deal nowadays for a Stanley 8. It will make a great user. I am curious if somebody at some point had attached a fence to it for jointing 90s. I had seen people use these upside down in a vise with a fence and feeding material into it as well.

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m4778

37 posts in 505 days


#4 posted 01-25-2022 07:06 PM



That s probably a good deal. It s hard to say much about it from the photos you posted. We d need a picture of the area in front of the rear handle (tote). Also, a square-on picture of the sole. There are 3 spots there that look as if somebody drilled holes in the bottom of it. That wouldn t seriously affect it s usefullness, but would make it less valuable to a collector.

Secondly, the blade looks a little short and may not have very much usable steel left. You need to be careful not to get carried away in sharpening Definitely don t use a power grinder on the blade.

If you remove the lever cap and blade and take some photos, we can tell you more.

Also, there is a white streak on the inside of the left cheek. I m assuming that s a paint run, but it coujld also be a crack repair. A photo of the left cheek would help.

And one more… if it s a 1910 plane it should have what is called a “low knob”. Yours seems to have a “tall knob”, which would be replacement. It might have been replaced because a prevoius user preferred the tall knob or because the original knob was damaged.

And finally, the horn of the tote is broken, but this too is mostly cosmetic and can be fixed. Several of my planes are like that.

- Ocelot

Very interesting, i’ll get more images tonight after work. I definitely love learning the history about tools like this so any additional info once I get the pictures would be greatly appreciated.

I thought those holes in the sole were strange but again had no idea what “normal” is for these.

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m4778

37 posts in 505 days


#5 posted 01-25-2022 07:11 PM



I would say for $80 its a good deal nowadays for a Stanley 8. It will make a great user. I am curious if somebody at some point had attached a fence to it for jointing 90s. I had seen people use these upside down in a vise with a fence and feeding material into it as well.

- SMP


That actually seems like it would be useful for jointing 90s. If the holes are already there I might end up making a removable jig piece and take advantage of that.

I can’t imagine trying to jam material into a plane instead of bringing the plane to the material… I don’t see what advantages that might provide?

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Carey Mitchell

218 posts in 3418 days


#6 posted 01-25-2022 11:01 PM

I blew the photos up, and the white stripe does appear to be paint. But…....those spots on the bottom look like holes.

Regardless, that’s not a bad price for a #8.

Look at my posts for how I restored the Japanning on a couple of planes,

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bandit571

31892 posts in 4143 days


#7 posted 01-25-2022 11:07 PM

Yep, they be big planes..

This one is a Type 19….

And..that is a LOT of groovy-ness going on…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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m4778

37 posts in 505 days


#8 posted 01-26-2022 01:40 PM

Lots more pictures. I tried to capture everything in more detail.

The white strip was definitely some paint. Also I took a fine scotchbrite pad to the sole, and even dry with no solvents it shines up real quick. There doesn’t even seem to be any rust on this, just some dirt.

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Ocelot

3808 posts in 4097 days


#9 posted 01-26-2022 02:12 PM

Ah, that’s a type 13 or 14, I think, which should have a high knob.

U.S. Patents expire in 17 years and Stanley was meticulous (sp?) about removing patent dates after they were expired. So, the 1910 date would remain on a tool until 1927 (or so). This would be a “Sweetheart” plane.

There should be a ring in the casting at the base of the knob with the bottom end of the knob tapered (slightly conical) to mate with the ring in the casting. That was added at type 14 and makes the knob much less likely to split at the bottom under load. I can’t see that on your plane, so perhaps it is type 13 (1925-1928).

Here's a summary of the so-called types.

-Paul

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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m4778

37 posts in 505 days


#10 posted 01-26-2022 02:20 PM

Very cool, thanks for the info!

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

17825 posts in 4078 days


#11 posted 01-26-2022 03:12 PM

I second the call re: type 13. Mouth looks good / no cracks, which is a very good thing. I prefer corrugated sole for longer planes too, so that’s also a winner. Lever cap is an earlier ‘type,’ meaning it could be a replacement. BUT Stanley also used up parts until they were gone, not worrying about the types, so it could just as well be original to the plane.

Still unclear on those holes, but it is certainly a deal at $80. The no. 8 is one of my most-used planes.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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Don W

20387 posts in 4027 days


#12 posted 01-27-2022 12:43 PM

It looks like a great plane. I’d oil it up and use it! The holes are a bit of a mystery but won’t hurt the performance.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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Don W

20387 posts in 4027 days


#13 posted 01-27-2022 12:44 PM

It looks like a great plane. I’d oil it up and use it! The holes are a bit of a mystery but won’t hurt the performance.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View controlfreak's profile (online now)

controlfreak

3747 posts in 1061 days


#14 posted 01-27-2022 12:51 PM

I would like to figure out the holes, are they threaded? I get the two on one side, maybe a fence, but not the one on the other.

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m4778

37 posts in 505 days


#15 posted 01-27-2022 01:02 PM



I would like to figure out the holes, are they threaded? I get the two on one side, maybe a fence, but not the one on the other.

- controlfreak


Yea all 3 holes are threaded

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