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Forum topic by hiemab posted 01-24-2022 04:45 PM 676 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hiemab

4 posts in 124 days


01-24-2022 04:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saws grizzly advice

Hi everyone,

I just found this site and already I’ve learned so much from reading everyones experiences on different tools.

I’m starting a new business and after making the prototypes of the wooden boxes that I need and speaking with different carpenters I’ve decided that I’ll be making the boxes myself, at least for the time being until I’m up and running and making more money to source it out.

I have a very very basic Ryobi table saw that I used to make the prototypes and I realize that I need a more professional setup to get these looking the way I want them to look.

What I’m building are fairly simple boxes that require cuts at varying angles. I won’t be using any hardwoods, and if I do they won’t be thicker than a half inch so I don’t need anything very powerful. Accuracy is the most important thing for me.

I started looking at different hybrid saws and landed on the Grizzly G0771Z because of the price point and the reviews that I’ve read, but I’m wondering if this table saw will be overkill for me.

Do you think that I can get the same results with the portable Grizzly G0870? Or even the Dewalt or Bosch portable table saws? Or is there another saw that I should be considering for this?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Cheers!


22 replies so far

View Robert's profile

Robert

4988 posts in 2939 days


#1 posted 01-25-2022 01:02 AM

Yeah, you should be considering a SawStop.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View NohoGerry's profile

NohoGerry

58 posts in 169 days


#2 posted 01-25-2022 01:32 AM

It’s tough to give you advice without knowing a little more about the boxes you intend to build-e.g.dimensions? Are these small boxes or cabinet sized carcases?
Since you do mention that you don’t need a lot of power, and will not be cutting thick hardwood pieces, the 2HP Grizzly may be a lot more saw than you need.
It would also help to know what you mean by “cuts of varying angles”? Are these miter cuts to join the sides of the boxes together? or angled cuts across the face of the boards for boxes whose shape is irregular?

Accuracy is a function of machine setup, and the right jigs/fixtures for the saw-not it’s size, how “professional” it looks, or how expensive it is. For example, most of the box makers whose work is exhibited here have a variety of crosscut boxes (i.e. a fixture you make that rides in the miter slots of the saw table and replaces the miter guage that come with saws. They can be made to deliver angled cuts if you design them that way. And all can be built to deliver extreme levels of accuracy.

Your needs could be satisfied by a quality contractor saw (e.g. the DeWalt DWE7491RS 10” Jobsite Table Saw ), which has plenty of power for what you need. And with a high quality blade-Freud, Forrest, Tenryu, Amana) in the proper configuration (i.e. high number of teeth and designed for finish level cuts-60T for example) your accuracy is improved even more.

And, you end up spending a lot less for the solution you’re looking for.

Gerry

View pottz's profile

pottz

25817 posts in 2443 days


#3 posted 01-25-2022 01:43 AM

i love when people come on here and expect us to tell them (you) what you need.we have no idea what level of quality your trying to achieve or how much use the saw will get.could you maybe post some pic’s of these boxes your making.you say no hardwoods so i picture low quality boxes ? if thats the case probably a simple contractor saw will do the job.who knows,i sure cant tell ya based on what little information youve given us.what would work for me probably wouldn’t for you.you gotta spend some time doing research to figure out what is best.dont go on someones elses choice,you’ll probably regret it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View jeff's profile

jeff

1458 posts in 4924 days


#4 posted 01-25-2022 03:00 AM

Agree with the feedback here. I would suggest increasing your budget and hold out for a cabinet saw. More mass with the ability to achieve greater accuracy. And high quality blades would take it to the next level.

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

8527 posts in 3179 days


#5 posted 01-25-2022 03:51 AM

Of what you’ve mentioned, the Grizzly G0771Z sounds like your best bet, I don’t think anyone has ever thought of their saw being overkill. You’ll use it’s capacity eventually and be glad you have it. A portable saw doesn’t have the mass of a bigger saw and that mass is your friend when you start dealing with bigger lumber or sheet material. The universal screamer motors of the small portable saws don’t have the duty cycle or lifespan of a proper induction motor, if you’re planning on doing anything professionally where the saw doesn’t need to move, avoid them.

Don’t sucumb to the want of more of a saw than you’re likely to need in the near future, if you want to drop $4.5K on some taiwanese whiz bang super deluxe bought it because someone told you you needed it saw go for it. Keep in focus what you want and will need, not what others push upon you.

-- “I never in my life thought I would have to say this, but the proper role of government is not to fund the distribution of crack pipes,” Lauren Boebert

View hiemab's profile

hiemab

4 posts in 124 days


#6 posted 01-25-2022 04:53 AM

Hey guys thanks for the quick replies.


Yeah, you should be considering a SawStop.

- Robert

Great! Thanks for the suggestion. Do you think the sawstop is a better tool or just so I don’t lose a finger?


It s tough to give you advice without knowing a little more about the boxes you intend to build-e.g.dimensions? Are these small boxes or cabinet sized carcases?
Since you do mention that you don t need a lot of power, and will not be cutting thick hardwood pieces, the 2HP Grizzly may be a lot more saw than you need.
It would also help to know what you mean by “cuts of varying angles”? Are these miter cuts to join the sides of the boxes together? or angled cuts across the face of the boards for boxes whose shape is irregular?

Accuracy is a function of machine setup, and the right jigs/fixtures for the saw-not it s size, how “professional” it looks, or how expensive it is. For example, most of the box makers whose work is exhibited here have a variety of crosscut boxes (i.e. a fixture you make that rides in the miter slots of the saw table and replaces the miter guage that come with saws. They can be made to deliver angled cuts if you design them that way. And all can be built to deliver extreme levels of accuracy.

Your needs could be satisfied by a quality contractor saw (e.g. the DeWalt DWE7491RS 10” Jobsite Table Saw ), which has plenty of power for what you need. And with a high quality blade-Freud, Forrest, Tenryu, Amana) in the proper configuration (i.e. high number of teeth and designed for finish level cuts-60T for example) your accuracy is improved even more.

And, you end up spending a lot less for the solution you re looking for.

Gerry

- NohoGerry

Thanks for the reply Gerry. I realize now that I didn’t give any dimension or really explain what I was making very well. The two shapes that I’m making are a hexagon and a pyramid. The hexagon is about 10”x10”x6” and the pyramid is about 14”x14” and about 11” tall. The thickness of the wood or plywood that i’ll be using is 1/2”. Obviously the pyramid is the most complicated one out of those and requires the most accurate angle cuts. Also, both of these boxes have a side that slides out so you have access to the inside of the box. The hexagon has it on the top and the pyramid has it on the bottom. The bottom of the pyramid slides out completely.

The hexagon I will be building from red oak that’s 1/2 inch thick. I was able to source that but I couldn’t find a place that had 1/2 inch thick hardwood that’s wider than 6-9 inches, which is why I’m building the pyramid from plywood for now. This is why I was thinking power was not much of an issue, just something that’s stable, accurate, and easy to dial in. Also, something that I can add a router extension to would be great as i’ll be using the router for these too.

I completely understand what you mean about needing a proper fixture and that’s a great point. Definitely something to consider. Do you have any links or suggestions of where I should look for how to make my own crosscut boxes?


i love when people come on here and expect us to tell them (you) what you need.we have no idea what level of quality your trying to achieve or how much use the saw will get.could you maybe post some pic s of these boxes your making.you say no hardwoods so i picture low quality boxes ? if thats the case probably a simple contractor saw will do the job.who knows,i sure cant tell ya based on what little information youve given us.what would work for me probably wouldn t for you.you gotta spend some time doing research to figure out what is best.dont go on someones elses choice,you ll probably regret it.

- pottz

Hey pottz, thanks for your input. I certainly wasn’t expecting you to just “tell me what I need”, i just wanted to hear some opinions from people that have much more experience than I do.


Agree with the feedback here. I would suggest increasing your budget and hold out for a cabinet saw. More mass with the ability to achieve greater accuracy. And high quality blades would take it to the next level.

- jeff

Thanks for the reply Jeff. Budget is not a big issue right now so I could afford a cabinet saw, I’m just wondering if I need something that size for a project like this.


Of what you ve mentioned, the Grizzly G0771Z sounds like your best bet, I don t think anyone has ever thought of their saw being overkill. You ll use it s capacity eventually and be glad you have it. A portable saw doesn t have the mass of a bigger saw and that mass is your friend when you start dealing with bigger lumber or sheet material. The universal screamer motors of the small portable saws don t have the duty cycle or lifespan of a proper induction motor, if you re planning on doing anything professionally where the saw doesn t need to move, avoid them.

Don t sucumb to the want of more of a saw than you re likely to need in the near future, if you want to drop $4.5K on some taiwanese whiz bang super deluxe bought it because someone told you you needed it saw go for it. Keep in focus what you want and will need, not what others push upon you.

- bigblockyeti

Hey bigblock, thanks for the reply! I agree with you 100%, I don’t think i’ll regret having something with a bit more power. I do have a dedicated space that I’m going to turn into a little shop so I can get something with more mass that doesn’t need to move. I really like the grizzly, but recently got turned on to the harvey table saws and the alpha hw110lc-36p looks like a beautiful machine. So now I’m rethinking…

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bigblockyeti

8527 posts in 3179 days


#7 posted 01-25-2022 11:37 AM

Do some research, someone on this site (maybe a few) has gotten a Harvey and documented their experience. It sounds like they make a decent product but given how new they are you have to dig a little to find those who have them and how well they work or don’t work.

-- “I never in my life thought I would have to say this, but the proper role of government is not to fund the distribution of crack pipes,” Lauren Boebert

View etout00's profile

etout00

5 posts in 119 days


#8 posted 01-25-2022 02:01 PM

I just purchased a SawStop PCS 1.75 and I honestly wouldn’t even consider any other brand. Not only does SawStop have the safety feature, it’s also an incredibly well made machine….you’re not just paying for a safety feature, the saw itself is quality.

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

397 posts in 1703 days


#9 posted 01-25-2022 02:37 PM



.......

I completely understand what you mean about needing a proper fixture and that s a great point. Definitely something to consider. Do you have any links or suggestions of where I should look for how to make my own crosscut boxes?

.......

- hiemab


Search for “crosscut sled” to find DIY versions of fixtures you can make

View OldBull's profile

OldBull

570 posts in 754 days


#10 posted 01-25-2022 03:08 PM

””Accuracy is the most important thing for me””. I had to learn and still have trouble remembering wood is not steel. Accuracy is a moving target with wood. It moves, it flexes, and no matter how perfect I try to be with the equipment I have accuracy still at times is difficult. Although the word overkill is easy to use, it is not overkill when the tolerences on the saw you are using contribute to the accuracy (or inaccuracy) you are trying to achive. What I am trying to say is a high quality machine can not be overkill, size maybe but quality not. Repeatablilty is a key word you should familiarize yourself with. You speak about the saw but you should also do as much research on the fence and/or fence systems depending on just how accurate you need to be.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3439 posts in 2047 days


#11 posted 01-25-2022 04:08 PM

If you want accuracy, invest in incra. Their T-rules, fences, miter gauges, etc., move you to the next level.

MicroMark makes a tiny 4” benchtop saw. But truly, once you own a good saw, you’ll find projects to make. You’ll grow into the 771.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3742 posts in 1060 days


#12 posted 01-25-2022 04:48 PM

I would pick the 2 or more best comparable saws that have similar rating, power and features. Make one of them a saw stop. Compare prices and and pros and cons. If the difference between SS and not is in your opinion “worth it” go for it and if not don’t. Somewhere in this mix is going to be how long you can wait for delivery as well. Good luck, its all on you now.

View skatefriday's profile

skatefriday

546 posts in 2941 days


#13 posted 01-25-2022 09:01 PM

I was all set to buy the Grizzly contractor saw

https://www.tablesawcentral.com/grizzly-g0732-contractor-table-saw-review/

a number of years ago and then they took it off the market before I pulled the trigger.

So I bit the bullet and ordered the G1023 instead. NOT ONCE have I ever thought to myself, “Boy I really wish I had that G0732 instead.”

View ljislink's profile

ljislink

43 posts in 275 days


#14 posted 01-25-2022 09:38 PM

Max out as much as you can comfortably afford take into account other tools you will be wanting. You don’t have have a Sawstop to keep your fingers they are great saws and if it makes you happy buy one you cant go wrong. Most of the other Saws are all made in same place with a bit different specs and colors. A Grizzly, Harvey.Laguna or Shop Fox saw will work just fine. Once you hit 1.5K range just start comparing the differences and if you have specific question on there differences than post up you’ll get good responses here & you’ll have a better idea of what your spending your money on.

View skatefriday's profile

skatefriday

546 posts in 2941 days


#15 posted 01-25-2022 11:31 PM

So I bit the bullet and ordered the G1023 instead. NOT ONCE have I ever thought to myself, “Boy I really wish I had that G0732 instead.”

- skatefriday

Holy cow! I just went to check the price of the G1023RLW. I paid $1360 for that saw back in 2014. Today it’s $2425. Ouch!

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