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Jig to rip boards at an angle?

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Forum topic by Zvonko posted 01-21-2022 05:25 PM 895 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Zvonko

152 posts in 1274 days


01-21-2022 05:25 PM

I’ve seen plenty of jigs for cutting angles on a table saw. I’m wondering if anyone has seen a table saw jig for ripping boards at an angle?

It’s a pain to kneel down and turn the wheel to get the blade set to an angle. The thing is, even after doing that I can not reproduce the exact same angle later. Seems like having some kind of jig that let’s you put the board at an angle instead of turning the blade.

Hope that makes sense

-- You can't always control WHAT happens, but you can always control HOW you respond.


22 replies so far

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Loren

11506 posts in 5108 days


#1 posted 01-21-2022 05:30 PM

I’ve seen them made for doing raised panels and mitering case edges. One downside of such jigs is that they are bulky.

I had a Tannewitz table saw with a tilting fence one could use to rip an angle without tilting the blade.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

3225 posts in 1007 days


#2 posted 01-21-2022 09:12 PM

is this what you mean? many versions of this type can be found on youtube. I have a post for this one on my projects page, page 4

-- WWBBJ: the first to compare a woman´s cheek to a rose was a poet. The second, an idiot. Dali

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Zvonko

152 posts in 1274 days


#3 posted 01-21-2022 09:45 PM



is this what you mean?

- wildwoodbybrianjohns

Not quite although I like this one too. This seems to me more of a jig to do miter cuts on table saw. I’m talking about a jig that allows you to rip a board length-wise at an angle. For example, to make my french cleats, I’ll rip a 1×6 down the middle at a 45 angle.

-- You can't always control WHAT happens, but you can always control HOW you respond.

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Ocelot

3808 posts in 4098 days


#4 posted 01-21-2022 09:52 PM

A magnetic angle cube can help a lot to get the blade beveled at the exact intended angle. Maybe I’m missing what makes it hard. Seems simpler to me to just angle the blade. As for the difficulty of getting down and turning the crank, you can get you a foam knee board at HF for about $5 – 2 inch think stiff foam about 12×18 inches. But then you won’t be able to see the angle cube. On my contractor saw it doesn’t seem hard to do standing up.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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BlasterStumps

2397 posts in 1900 days


#5 posted 01-21-2022 09:55 PM

Do you have a track saw? Seems that would be a good method for that rip cut.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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Phil32

1754 posts in 1364 days


#6 posted 01-21-2022 10:26 PM

The blade angle setting on your table saw was specifically included to make angled rip cuts possible. If the setting is too tight, try lubricating it. If the pointer arrow is off, set it to zero when the blade is exactly vertical. It should not require getting on your knees!

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

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waho6o9

9194 posts in 4037 days


#7 posted 01-21-2022 10:28 PM

Track saw

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MrUnix

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#8 posted 01-21-2022 10:42 PM

It’s a pain to kneel down and turn the wheel to get the blade set to an angle. The thing is, even after doing that I can not reproduce the exact same angle later. Seems like having some kind of jig that let’s you put the board at an angle instead of turning the blade.

The bevel adjustment on your table saw is for doing exactly what you want to do. If you want accurate bevels, then get an angle gauge like the Wixey or similar. I have no idea why you would need to get on your knees to set the angle though.

Also, you mentioned doing 45 degree cuts. There should be an adjustable positive stop on your saw for 90 and 45 degrees. Once you set them accurately, you never have to touch them again, and doing those 45 degree cuts simply requires you tilting the blade until it hits the stop. After making your bevel cuts, simply crank the blade the other way until it hits the 90 degree stop.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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EarlS

5524 posts in 3808 days


#9 posted 01-22-2022 12:35 AM

I can move the fence to one side of the blade or the other so the board is between the fence and the blade, but is it better for the cutoff piece to be on top of the blade or under it?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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LesB

3471 posts in 4903 days


#10 posted 01-22-2022 12:36 AM

Besides setting the angle there is the problem of consistently holding the board down and against the fence. There are a number of hold downs and feather board applications you can use to help with that that have worked for me.

As I look at the idea the jig would have to be mounted to the saw and the board slid through a guide on the jig.

Most of my cuts like that have been to miter plywood cases for a flow over affect of the grain or to hide the edge grain but it would be hard to run a sheet of plywood through a jig.

I think what us old guys need is a “power” tilt on our table saw so we don’t have to get down on our knees to turn the handle. Then a power feed for running the board through the blade. Of course it should be computerized and controlled from our smart phone app too. LOL But wait we could buy a CNC machine to do all that instead of using the talb saw. I knew there must be a reason to convince my wife to buy a CNC.

-- Les B, Oregon

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SMP

5315 posts in 1366 days


#11 posted 01-22-2022 12:49 AM


. I have no idea why you would need to get on your knees to set the angle though.

- MrUnix

Yeah I’m not following. On my saw i just use my arm to reach down…

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Zvonko

152 posts in 1274 days


#12 posted 01-22-2022 11:05 AM


. I have no idea why you would need to get on your knees to set the angle though.

- MrUnix

Yeah I’m not following. On my saw i just use my arm to reach down…

- SMP

I’m 6’4” so I’ve always had to bend pretty far to get to most things!

Why do I need to get on my knees? Bad back, arthritis, and my height make it difficult for me to just bend down anymore. Getting on my knees to look at the angle markings as I tilt the blade is more comfortable than bending over and possibly getting one of those “lovely” spasms in my back.

-- You can't always control WHAT happens, but you can always control HOW you respond.

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Zvonko

152 posts in 1274 days


#13 posted 01-22-2022 11:35 AM



The bevel adjustment on your table saw is for doing exactly what you want to do. If you want accurate bevels, then get an angle gauge like the Wixey or similar. I have no idea why you would need to get on your knees to set the angle though.

Yea, I know that’s what it’s for. Just wondered if there was a jig for something like that. It’s very uncomfortable for me to stand, bend at the waist to turn the angle adjustment wheel under the saw and watch the angle gauge (A good idea that someone suggested a while ago). Getting on my knees feels more stable for me and less chance of sudden back spasms


Also, you mentioned doing 45 degree cuts. There should be an adjustable positive stop on your saw for 90 and 45 degrees. Once you set them accurately, you never have to touch them again, and doing those 45 degree cuts simply requires you tilting the blade until it hits the stop. After making your bevel cuts, simply crank the blade the other way until it hits the 90 degree stop.

I’m using a Delta 10” contractor table saw (36-725). unfortunately, it doesn’t have adjustable positive stops that I can see. Having the positive stops would make a huge difference.

-- You can't always control WHAT happens, but you can always control HOW you respond.

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ChefHDAN

1884 posts in 4310 days


#14 posted 01-22-2022 11:43 AM

In all my years I do not think I have ever trusted the markings on the saw for the angles. Before I got a Wixey, I’d always use a protractor and bevel gauge, Aside from building an 8’ long sled with an angled bed I can’t think of any other way to do what you’re asking. The track saw is a good idea, but a Wixey would be WAY cheaper.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Robert

4989 posts in 2941 days


#15 posted 01-22-2022 12:17 PM

I feel your pain……

I think something could be fashioned in the way of a sled that registers off the fence, and tilts and securely holds a board. Something like what WWBBJ shows but longer.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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