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Forum topic by Sanderguy777 posted 01-19-2022 05:19 AM 1063 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sanderguy777

283 posts in 2661 days


01-19-2022 05:19 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw jigsaw scroll saw restoration

About a year ago, my art professor told me that I should find a used tablesaw and restore it. He said it would give me a better understanding of the machinery etc.
I did that. For $150 I got a working saw that I proceeded to derust, fix the bearings, etc. I finished it, and then a scroll saw, and just a couple weeks ago I finished a 1960s Nikon microscope.

Well, today I got another Craftsman 103 tablesaw for $25! It is a lot more rusted, but it had other parts I want. The last one I got I decided to fix to perfection. This time I think I am going to just toss everything inside the bucket of Evaporust and call it a day. I can paint it afterwards, so I don’t think that it will be an issue to not wire wheel anything other than the angle and height screws.

-- Marc Spagnuolo (standing in front of clamp wall): I think I need a few more . Me (owner of at least 8 clamps):.....?


13 replies so far

View RClark's profile

RClark

291 posts in 3644 days


#1 posted 01-19-2022 11:54 AM

I don’t see a “problem.” You apparently derive satisfaction from taking other people’s cast-offs and returning them to service. Not a single thing wrong with that!

The last “large” machine I bought new was my SawStop table saw. I’ve continued to add machines, but all are used, some in better shape than the others. I rehabbed the first few, taking them all apart, cleaning, scrubbing, lubing, and then repainting. But for the past few, I’ve only done enough to put them back into good service, meaning, aligned, tuned, and ready to use. I don’t care about shop cosmetics.

I was noticing the other day that the decal on my SawStop is faded and beginning to peel. The red print on the fence measuring scale is also faded to nothingness. That’s because the orientation of my shop is to the east, and the morning sun streams in on the saw, particularly when the overhead door is open in warmer months. I might replace the decal since SS offers them for a relative pittance, but the fence tape will remain as is.

In short, my machines are somewhat like me, I guess. Getting older, with aging evident, but everything still works as it should. I guess my machines fit me.

-- Ray

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7481 posts in 3953 days


#2 posted 01-19-2022 12:42 PM

What caught my eye was the Nikon microscope. You obviously have some mechanical talent which is not as widespread anymore as it used to be.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1740 posts in 2010 days


#3 posted 01-19-2022 12:50 PM

Sounds more like a gift than a problem and after it all you have great quality tools that’ll allow you to produce better work! Would love to see some before and after pictures

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View JD77's profile

JD77

173 posts in 1149 days


#4 posted 01-19-2022 01:30 PM

I had the same problem but mine was a curbside trashpick. I was hoping I could set the second saw up for my dado blade, but it was too far gone. I still derusted the top and what parts I could. I sold the two cast iron webbed wings for a few bucks and swapped the main table for my existing right extension. It only added 6 or 8 inches, but it is solid, not webbed and won’t tip the saw. The biggest perk are the two additional miter slots which ended up very parallel to the originals. Now my larger crosscut sled is set up for several common cuts based on which miter slot the bar is set in. Good luck with your find
-JD

View squazo's profile

squazo

393 posts in 3104 days


#5 posted 01-19-2022 11:02 PM

parts can be rusted beyond restoration. Threads gone, holes oversized, hexes rounded etc…

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1752 posts in 1363 days


#6 posted 01-19-2022 11:21 PM

Some of us have done restoration of old automobiles for years. I bought a 1931 Ford for $100 and sold it some years later for $20,000. i won’t bore you with the other expenses along the way.

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

9000 posts in 3658 days


#7 posted 01-19-2022 11:24 PM

The slippery slope is steep, and electrolysis is your friend ;)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

5613 posts in 2954 days


#8 posted 01-19-2022 11:40 PM

You caught the dreaded machine restoration virus?
Do you crave the smell of old ARN and machine oil too?
So sorry for you. :-(0)

DO NOT for any reason visit the Vintagemachinery.org or OWWM.org forums.

Most newbies with ARN restoration disease find those sites and end up binge reading for so long; they miss work and family/friends need to organize an intervention.
Am so glad the site(s) didn’t exist 40+ years when ARN disease infected my blood from hanging around folks who restored old steam/gas engines.

Best Luck, you will need it.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

510 posts in 2234 days


#9 posted 01-20-2022 12:10 AM

You do have a problem , a big one.
What next ?
Picture would be great.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

8530 posts in 3180 days


#10 posted 01-20-2022 12:38 AM

You need to be registered over on OWWM.org if you want to see some folks that have really gone in deep. Wait until you’re scouring all of North America for a Yates American Y20 knowing it will cost and arm and a leg even needing restoration all before getting it shipped home.

-- “I never in my life thought I would have to say this, but the proper role of government is not to fund the distribution of crack pipes,” Lauren Boebert

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1522 posts in 846 days


#11 posted 01-20-2022 12:41 AM


Some of us have done restoration of old automobiles for years. I bought a 1931 Ford for $100 and sold it some years later for $20,000. i won t bore you with the other expenses along the way.

- Phil32


Ha! Isn’t that the truth Phil. ”$40,000 in parts and labor into this but I’m letting it go for 20k”. Been there more than once but never count the labor of love costs.

-- Darrel

View AMZ's profile

AMZ

400 posts in 849 days


#12 posted 01-21-2022 05:15 PM


Some of us have done restoration of old automobiles for years. I bought a 1931 Ford for $100 and sold it some years later for $20,000. i won t bore you with the other expenses along the way.

- Phil32

Ha! Isn t that the truth Phil. ”$40,000 in parts and labor into this but I m letting it go for 20k”. Been there more than once but never count the labor of love costs.

- Foghorn

48 Chevy Areoline Fleetline 2 door sedan. Bought for $8,000.00, put another $12,000.00 into it. I can sell it anytime for $8,000.00. Haven’t sold it, so I haven’t lost any money!

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3808 posts in 4097 days


#13 posted 01-21-2022 10:25 PM

I knew a guy who rebuilt a Ford LTD. He said he just started fooling around with it and one thing let to another. Then he wished he had worked on a car that was worth something.

<sigh> There is an important principle in that.

-Paul

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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