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Moving a SawStop CNS

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Forum topic by JoeFuture posted 01-16-2022 07:17 PM 355 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JoeFuture

51 posts in 630 days


01-16-2022 07:17 PM

We’ve just sold our house and are moving across the country. I have a SawStop Contractor Saw with the 36” fence/table. I’ve been told by the movers that it’ll be fine, they’ll just load it on the truck as-is, but having moved before I know they aren’t always super careful.

Would you recommend I break it down, taking off the fence, rails, extension table, and maybe even the side wings? Should I leave the motor on? Or just sell it and upgrade to the cabinet saw when I get settled into the new place?


4 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

8526 posts in 3178 days


#1 posted 01-16-2022 07:22 PM

I would review what their insurance policy looks like and hope that it was either not damaged at all or completely smashed. Anything in between would concern me as who’s going to be doing the fixing and what’s the lead time on whatever parts have gotten messed up.

-- “I never in my life thought I would have to say this, but the proper role of government is not to fund the distribution of crack pipes,” Lauren Boebert

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RClark

290 posts in 3643 days


#2 posted 01-16-2022 08:56 PM

Partial disassembly and then reassembly at distant end will save much time and heartache, regardless of who might “pay” for repairs. In my experience with “professional” movers, it is always a lot of trouble to made whole for any damages suffered during the move.

I’ve moved my well-equipped shop twice. One was across town, one was across the country. I removed all easily-removed pieces and wrapped them separately. The first move was a contractor saw, the second move was with my SS cabinet saw. I removed fence, fence rails, extension tables, wings, and removed the motor in the case of the contractor saw. Anything you can do to make a piece of equipment more “cube shaped” will decrease risk to the machine in question.

Yes, it’s a lot of work. But I’d rather spend time taking disassembling/reassembling machines than paperwork and aggravating phone calls, only to be disappointed in the end.

-- Ray

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JoeFuture

51 posts in 630 days


#3 posted 01-16-2022 11:41 PM

Thank you @RClark. That’s what I was considering doing if I end up moving it. I think I’ll need to do quite a bit of that even if I sell it locally. Good to know yours survived the trip when well-prepared!

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RClark

290 posts in 3643 days


#4 posted 01-17-2022 12:46 AM



Thank you @RClark. That s what I was considering doing if I end up moving it. I think I ll need to do quite a bit of that even if I sell it locally. Good to know yours survived the trip when well-prepared!

- JoeFuture

When I reassembled, I pulled out the manual and went through the setup process just like when I first bought the saw. It went right back together, and very little tuning was needed to put it back into service.

Helpful hint: When disassembling, keep all parts together (ziploc bags) and tape those parts to the respective disassembled pieces. That kind of stuff is very easy to lose, so it’s worth the time to keep it all together. That’s hard-earned experience from 15 moves over the past 40 years. But, you’ll see the quality manufacturing in that SS when you take it apart carefully, and then it goes back together like it’s brand new.

Good luck!

-- Ray

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