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Partition wall uneven garage floor

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Forum topic by Derrick posted 01-14-2022 03:39 AM 417 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Derrick

269 posts in 2468 days


01-14-2022 03:39 AM

Hello,

We’re splitting up our tiny garage, so I can finally have a dedicated workspace.

To split up the space, my plan is to build a partition wall. I have very little knowledge of framing. I built our shed a couple years ago, and that’s where I did most of my learning. I’m going to do my best to explain myself. Forgive me if I use incorrect terms.

My concern is what I think is called the foundation wall. The garage floor has a slope outward and that leaves a lip all the way around. Highest towards the garage door. Lowest towards the back. Here’s what I’m talking about

That’s where my confusion begins. I know the wall would need to be attached to the studs of the garage, overhead to the joists, and anchored to the concrete. If I run my bottom plate all the way to the garage wall, it won’t sit flush with the concrete floor. There will be like a 3/4” gap.

Do I start my bottom and top plate just inside that lip so everything sits flat on the ground? If I do that, the partition would start about 3 inches in from the nearest stud. Do I just use some sort of blocking to make up the difference to securely attach it to the studs? In the end, everything will get covered with OSB and shelving, but shelving doesn’t make much sense if It’s not attached to to the studs.

Hopefully this makes sense to someone that can help.

Thank you!

Derrick


23 replies so far

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Derrick

269 posts in 2468 days


#1 posted 01-14-2022 04:46 AM

https://youtu.be/JYI9m2nH3vY

At the 3:09ish mark, this guy notches out bottom plate. Is that an acceptable method?

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Andre

4989 posts in 3136 days


#2 posted 01-14-2022 05:11 AM

Chip out the concrete, and make sure you put a foam seal under the bottom plate.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Derrick

269 posts in 2468 days


#3 posted 01-14-2022 05:18 AM



Chip out the concrete, and make sure you put a foam seal under the bottom plate.

- Andre

Oh, ok. Didn’t even think about that. I think I could manage that pretty easily.

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JohnDon

212 posts in 2499 days


#4 posted 01-14-2022 05:38 AM

Okay, my 2 cents- but beware- my experience with framing is about the same as yours! First, since this is a non-bearing wall, you really only need to make sure it’s sturdy enough to support drywall/wall covering, plus anything such as cabinets attached to the wall. The “lip” I assume is the top surface of the footings, and was poured separately from the slab floor. Anyway, I’d attach your base plate to the slab, with ends abutting the footings (“lips”). For the studs at each end of the new wall, nail “filler” studs to span the width of your lip. It looks like it’s ~2-3”, so use a couple of 2×4’s, forming a “U” cross section with the stud. Obviously, they’ll need to be cut shorter than the stud, but provide a nailing surface for the drywall. If you’re only covering one side of the wall, you just need one 2×4, to form an “L” shape. Don’t worry if your lip is less than 3-1/2” wide- the stud doesn’t need to but against the lip. Good luck!

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Chris

457 posts in 5416 days


#5 posted 01-14-2022 05:48 AM

Derrick—one of two ways and either way will work.

Yes, just add another 2×4 stud flat against the stud’s you’re referencing, inside each side wall, so those studs will line up with the new wall you’re planning on installing. If you have to add two inside each side wall… to give you what you need in order to line up with this new wall you’re going to be building, that’s fine too. It will be fine. Just nail in place good and it will be there for a thousand years.

OR the second way you could do it—get some ‘self leveling’ flooring compound…mix up enough to accommodate…. place there at the deviation in the flooring…trowel it smooth and step back…it will self level and you’ll have a flat, smooth surface for your floor plate. Allow to cure for about three days. Note: purchase floor anchor bolts at a length so that the wedge of the bolt actually embeds in the concrete already there and not your newly lain compound and you’ll be golden. A ‘hole through’ in the compound is fine, you just don’t want a anchor bolt wedge trying to open up inside the compound layer.

Either way will be golden. That said, if it was me, personally I’d go with the stud addition inside each side wall. Going to be much faster and less things to do in order to reach your end product.

Although I can’t see all of your particulars onsite, I feel confident is saying the stud addition is going to be a good route for you.

Just go with your gut. It will be fine.

-- Chris Harrell - custom callmaker ---http://www.quackycalls.com

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Derrick

269 posts in 2468 days


#6 posted 01-14-2022 05:57 AM

All great answers! Thank you guys!! I like that I have options. I’ll reassess things once I get everything pulled out of the space.

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controlfreak

3187 posts in 931 days


#7 posted 01-14-2022 11:07 AM

I t sounds like the top of the curb is poured level for two reasons. 1) to provide a level footing for the garage walls. 2) so that water in the garage can’t make it into the house. The change in height is likely due to the floor being sloped to shed water toward the door opening. So plan on the floor not being level. I would use screws to attach the new partition to existing structure so it can be removed if needed. Don’t forget to factor in weight demands on the wall like lumber storage racks etc. Don’t forget that it is a good time to add some outlets in the space. Lastly any wood that is to be in contact with the ground (concrete) needs to be treated wood and leave a gap between sheetrock/ plywood and the floor so moisture won’t wick up from floor if wet. Have fun and good luck!

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Jim Finn

2921 posts in 4252 days


#8 posted 01-14-2022 03:39 PM

I have done what you are planning, and this is what I did: For the wall I installed metal channel meant for metal studs on the floor and at the top. I then installed wooden 2×4’s and screwed them in place. Covered the wall, both sides and started to work on the sloped floor. You want a level floor. I installed a level wooden floor in the entire space flush with the top of the step up you have. I used no nails in this project all screws. When I moved, I disassembled all this and there was no sign of any of this except for a few threaded inserts in the concrete that held the bottom track down.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

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Fred Hargis

7350 posts in 3823 days


#9 posted 01-14-2022 04:19 PM

All god ideas above, but it just looks to me like the notching the plate trick is about the easiest way around it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Derrick

269 posts in 2468 days


#10 posted 01-14-2022 05:16 PM

These are all great! Most importantly, I can wrap my brain around all of them.

I’ll decide when I get in there. My wife still has to put her stamp of approval on a few things.

I’m doing the electrical on “my” side first. As I move everything out to tackle that job, I can figure out the finer details of the partition and the storage side of the garage.

I’ve got the floor plan sketched out, but I’m certain I’ll have to make some adjustments on the fly.

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CaptainKlutz

5146 posts in 2824 days


#11 posted 01-14-2022 06:00 PM

Comments FWIW:

- Get a copy of local building code.
It contains detailed requirements for framing. Not following code, could mean you have to tear down the wall to sell the house for failing buyers inspection. If an attached garage is used for vehicle storage, building code has more onerous rules. :(

:Code often require garage walls to be raised off the main floor by 3/4-1”; in case of fuel spills. I.E. You might have to pour leveling cement to match the foundation wall height. [Temp screw a couple 1×3 to floor with Tapcons, leveled out with shims and foam strips to seal under wood. Pour in between, and remove wood molds.]

:There are minimum wall covering thickness and type requirements for fire safety. If have second floor above garage, code usually requires 2 layers of drywall on walls/ceiling. If closing in portion of garage and add HVAC; it is considered living space; and there are more requirements including min electrical.

- Regardless of code, Doubt the floor is level; need to measure and make a framing plan.

- Doubt the ceiling is flat, and without sag; Need to measure and make allowances to fix severe sag.
: If fixing sag, this can convert new wall to a load bearing wall (using load bearing rules -oops).

- Making clean drywall corners that don’t crack over time, requires wood blocking in wall corner. Gypsum board crushes easily with heavy loads, and swells with water exposure. Hence, proper way to install a permanent wall is to remove the drywall for the framing to connect wood to wood. Also need to add blocking for existing drywall attachment. I.E.. +1 need to add studs into existing wall.

What I would do:
: Remove a strip of wall board at wall junction and insert new studs in existing wall for T-junction attachment.
Two choices – Laminate (4) 2×4 studs or make a U channel with (3) 2×4 studs. Wall attaches in center, and existing drywall attaches to 1.5” in each corner. With some luck, the existing drywall only needs a 3.625” wide strip removed and you can wedge the joist into place. Toe screw/nail the new joist to base/top plate.

: Remove a strip of drywall at ceiling T-junction. If joist run perpendicular to wall, attach the top plate to joists and install a filler block 2×4 for reattaching the ceiling drywall on each side of top plate opening. If joist run parallel to wall, need to add cross blocking between joists along entire wall at same centers as existing ceiling joist; to attach the top plate. If one end of wall is not attached to another wall, the end wall joist needs double or triple blocking in ceiling, just like the vertical stud. Hope you have access to attic, so you don’t have to remove/replace all the extra ceiling drywall.

As always, YMMV and Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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Derrick

269 posts in 2468 days


#12 posted 01-14-2022 06:21 PM

Wow. A ton of great info. Than you!
This will all be done with the intention of being temporary. By temporary, I mean only as long as we live in the house. All of our upgrades are done with that in mind.

The single car garage is small, so we’ve never used it for parking. This is just a way to bring some organization to the space. We have no plans on moving, but if that day ever comes, I would hope the next homeowners have less junk than we do.

I highly doubt my ceiling flat, but I can compensate for that with the studs.

My joists run parallel to the studs, so this is another area of concern. Where the wall makes most sense appears to be right in between two joists, and likely 2 studs. I may just shift the wall one way or the other to line it up, but I also looked into blocking like this:

It wouldn’t be a huge amount of drywall to tear out/replace, and it’s reversible if we ever move.

I plan on covering the wall in OSB at least on my side. Not sure on the storage side. Probably the same though.

I’ll definitely take pictures and ask questions as I go.

This has been a huge amount of help!

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CaptainKlutz

5146 posts in 2824 days


#13 posted 01-14-2022 07:56 PM

FWIW – Be 100% honest with temporary status.

If you plan to add electrical circuits, then it’s not considered temporary by NEC code. Majority of building codes require you to get a permit when you add circuits behind wall covering. Doing it right/proper to code is not temporary, and is whole lot harder to remove.

If it really is temporary; it does not have to be pretty.
As others posted above: Tapcon pressure treat base plate to floor and screws into ceiling blocking. Skip cutting/patching drywall for wood to wood connection. Cut wall covering tight to minimize gaps; but know it will leak heat/cool. Easy to build, 1/2 day to tear down and patch holes. Hardest part is adding blocking into existing wall/ceiling, as you need the same support for both permanent or temp wall.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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Derrick

269 posts in 2468 days


#14 posted 01-14-2022 08:17 PM



FWIW – Be 100% honest with temporary status.

If you plan to add electrical circuits, then it s not considered temporary by NEC code. Majority of building codes require you to get a permit when you add circuits behind wall covering. Doing it right/proper to code is not temporary, and is whole lot harder to remove.

If it really is temporary; it does not have to be pretty.
As others posted above: Tapcon pressure treat base plate to floor and screws into ceiling blocking. Skip cutting/patching drywall for wood to wood connection. Cut wall covering tight to minimize gaps; but know it will leak heat/cool. Easy to build, 1/2 day to tear down and patch holes. Hardest part is adding blocking into existing wall/ceiling, as you need the same support for both permanent or temp wall.

Best Luck.

- CaptainKlutz

Great points!

There is a bit of in-wall for the electrical. I’ll transition from our flush mounted breaker with romex and go to surface mounted MC. The junction boxes where the transition happens is the only area where I’ll be removing/replacing Sheetrock. That’s easy enough to undue. With the MC and the new outlets being all surface mounted, they’ll be easy to get rid of of the need arises.

This project is temporary in the sense that it can all be reversed. If this ends up being our forever home, there won’t be a need. With that said, it doesn’t NEED to be pretty, but I do have some sense of pride in my work, and I’d like to spend a little extra time to keep things neat.

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Knockonit

1062 posts in 1532 days


#15 posted 01-14-2022 08:49 PM

unless its structual, isn nothing in code dictating, just general practice, top plate, studs min of 24’’ oncenter, with a treated sole plate. min of three 16 nails at each stud at bot and top plate, if toe nailed, two if thru plate. block as needed. standard flat stud for door header if needed, if not load bearing,

pretty straight forward wall it sounds like, good luck, remember plumb the first couple and check as you go, makes putting wall sheets on easier if spacing and plumb is present
best of luck
rj in az

-- Living the dream

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