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Ideas on how to make a "drum"/cylinder table base?

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Forum topic by tcaz posted 01-13-2022 04:52 AM 1353 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tcaz

39 posts in 1291 days


01-13-2022 04:52 AM

Looking for some ideas on how to construct a ~23-26” diameter drum table base (see photo) for a 48”D top made from 8/4 maple.

Was thinking some sort of inner structure with 3/4” ply discs or circles for the shape, then wrapped in a thin substrate with hardwood veneer over it. Or kerf cut ply to wrap the drum? How would one go about it with all hardwood?

This is a first for me so any and all insight and wisdom are appreciated. Thanks!


14 replies so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

8547 posts in 3662 days


#1 posted 01-13-2022 11:57 AM

spend some time checking these blogs out, they may be of assistance

https://www.lumberjocks.com/robscastle/blog/37247

-- Regards Rob

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

12605 posts in 4886 days


#2 posted 01-13-2022 12:11 PM

A veneer wrapped sono tube would work. Reinforce with 1X2s on the inside.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View squazo's profile

squazo

393 posts in 3103 days


#3 posted 01-13-2022 01:37 PM

you can actually buy flexible plywood, that is made specifically for this purpose. There are many websites and if I recall correctly, they post minimum bend radius.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1675 posts in 3957 days


#4 posted 01-13-2022 02:10 PM

do it the way one would do a bucket.

one project from Mafe:
https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/20676

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn (and that is nice)

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1749 posts in 1361 days


#5 posted 01-13-2022 02:58 PM

It could be done like the turning blank of a segmented bowl with long boards with angled edges.

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

1235 posts in 1660 days


#6 posted 01-13-2022 03:45 PM

we used soni tube and wrapped with veneer, with a couple stiff backs inside tube to keep it rigid for weight
good luck
rj in az

sorry gene didn’t see your post till after i posted this, simplist way to do imo

-- Living the dream

View tcaz's profile

tcaz

39 posts in 1291 days


#7 posted 01-13-2022 03:58 PM



we used soni tube and wrapped with veneer, with a couple stiff backs inside tube to keep it rigid for weight
good luck
rj in az

sorry gene didn t see your post till after i posted this, simplist way to do imo

- Knockonit

How did you adhere the veneer to the sonotube? I’m not familiar with them other than a quick google search.

Do you have any photos of the project or process by chance?

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

5604 posts in 2952 days


#8 posted 01-13-2022 06:34 PM

Look at using a birds mouth joint that is easily cut on table saw. The sail boat DIY community has really helpful material online. They even show to make tapered conical shapes. Can download the calculators here

Another option not mentioned already and used in commercial builds; is covering a curved structure with Bendy ply or flexible plywood; which is smooth flat substrate for thick veneer (usually paper backed).

If deep down you wanted some fancy lathe turned column (and have budget for it); there are several folks that offer custom large diameter turning. Look at Blue Ox Mills, Hanson Woodturning, or Osborne Wood Products.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

1235 posts in 1660 days


#9 posted 01-13-2022 07:15 PM


we used soni tube and wrapped with veneer, with a couple stiff backs inside tube to keep it rigid for weight
good luck
rj in az

sorry gene didn t see your post till after i posted this, simplist way to do imo

- Knockonit

How did you adhere the veneer to the sonotube? I m not familiar with them other than a quick google search.

Do you have any photos of the project or process by chance?

- tcaz

no sorry, pretty sure the boys sprayed a contact cement, rolled the veneer on and put it in a vaccum press.

other option use soni tube, and rip pcs to fit around it. have seen that done,
good luck
rj in az

-- Living the dream

View Loren's profile

Loren

11505 posts in 5106 days


#10 posted 01-13-2022 08:48 PM

Check out Anderson International Trading. They sell paint grade and veneered round table bases in the size you need.

The one in the picture looks coopered from solid wood.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1675 posts in 3957 days


#11 posted 01-14-2022 11:43 AM



The one in the picture looks coopered from solid wood.
- Loren

+1

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn (and that is nice)

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

695 posts in 3192 days


#12 posted 01-17-2022 03:21 PM


... How would one go about it with all hardwood?

- tcaz


spend some time checking these blogs out, they may be of assistance

https://www.lumberjocks.com/robscastle/blog/37247

- robscastle

^ This is how you would do it with hardwood. Much like a wooden barrel.

Use a tablesaw to cut a slight angle on the long sides of each plank then glue it all together. It will form a faceted circle. Then you plane or sand the corners to make it nice and round.


... The one in the picture looks coopered from solid wood.

- Loren

“Cooper” is an old-timey term for someone that makes barrels using this method. Anyone with the last name “Cooper” probably had an ancestor that made barrels in England before last names became a thing among non-nobles.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View gbarnas's profile

gbarnas

120 posts in 240 days


#13 posted 01-17-2022 04:11 PM

Well TIL that SonoTubes are available up to 36” diameter! I’ve used the 12-16” tubes from the box stores before to create simple and lightweight tables and stands for trade show merchandise displays. Contact cement and you can wrap them with almost anything flexible – carpet, Formica, wood veneer. I cut some plywood disks to help them maintain their shape because the took some abuse. I still have a set almost 15 years later.

One thing to consider is that the design isn’t that stable with a wide top. I used a foot for my tall displays, and for the short ones, the top was removable and I had a 5/8” dowel sticking up in the base and dropped a pair of 5# dumbbell weights into the base to prevent it from tipping over.

-- Glenn, Jersey Shore, NJ

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1281 posts in 4275 days


#14 posted 01-17-2022 05:04 PM

I’d do it with solid wood too. I recently made a coopered wastebasket with staves and found it surprisingly easy and very fun to make. I cut the staves square on the tablesaw (these were tapered, yours wouldn’t be), marked both ends of each stave with a bevel gauge and used a handplane to get the angle on both sides of each stave. I then had to hollow each stave by hand before glue-up, but you won’t need to do this. You could shape the outside with planes, spokeshaves, scrapers, sanders. The more staves you use the less post-glueup shaping there is to do.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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