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Is there a name for this joint?

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Forum topic by DonnyBahama posted 12-31-2021 02:50 PM 1022 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DonnyBahama

249 posts in 3989 days


12-31-2021 02:50 PM

It’s kind of like a sliding dovetail except it doesn’t go all the way through…

-- Founding member of the (un)Official LumberJock's Frugal Woodworking Society - http://lumberjocks.com/topics/29451


18 replies so far

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LeeRoyMan

2728 posts in 1185 days


#1 posted 12-31-2021 03:01 PM

I just saw the same thing in this post made by Sylvian

He calls it a sliding dovetail key mortise.

And if you are really good, you can taper the mortise and tenon to pull the joint tight.
(above my payscale though)

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DonnyBahama

249 posts in 3989 days


#2 posted 12-31-2021 03:03 PM

Thank you!

-- Founding member of the (un)Official LumberJock's Frugal Woodworking Society - http://lumberjocks.com/topics/29451

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DonnyBahama

249 posts in 3989 days


#3 posted 12-31-2021 03:11 PM

Actually, the joint in that thread is not the same thing. But it did lead me to this – apparently the joint is called a housed sliding dovetail.

-- Founding member of the (un)Official LumberJock's Frugal Woodworking Society - http://lumberjocks.com/topics/29451

View xeddog's profile

xeddog

376 posts in 4465 days


#4 posted 12-31-2021 07:36 PM

I think it’s call a “complicated” joint, which is short for “excessively time consuming” joint.

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jonah

2283 posts in 4757 days


#5 posted 12-31-2021 07:54 PM



I think it s call a “complicated” joint, which is short for “excessively time consuming” joint.

- xeddog


That was my reaction. What’s the point of that joint, exactly?

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Sylvain

1675 posts in 3957 days


#6 posted 12-31-2021 08:12 PM

What s the point of that joint, exactly?
- jonah

Have a look at the links.

Fundamentally, it is a no glue/screw/nail joint which allows knock down/up.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn (and that is nice)

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Aj2

4450 posts in 3256 days


#7 posted 12-31-2021 08:23 PM

That’s the type of joint one thinks of making after smoking hippie hay.
Good luck

-- Aj

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HowardAppel

160 posts in 4492 days


#8 posted 01-01-2022 12:47 AM

Hippie Hay??? Is that what the cool kids are calling it now?

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LesB

3470 posts in 4901 days


#9 posted 01-01-2022 12:50 AM

Interesting but unnecessarily complicated and I don’t thing it would serve well if used for frequent knock down and reassembly. Eventually the fittings will get loose.
I would stick with a full length sliding dovetail that is blind on the front side.

-- Les B, Oregon

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DonnyBahama

249 posts in 3989 days


#10 posted 01-01-2022 02:19 AM

I think it s call a “complicated” joint, which is short for “excessively time consuming” joint.

- xeddog

That was my reaction. What s the point of that joint, exactly?

- jonah

It’s a joint used in Japanese woodworking (where craftsmanship is more important than how long it takes).

What s the point of that joint, exactly?
- jonah

As Sylvain pointed out, the joint, with its no glue, no hardware attributes, is popular in Japanese carpentry where craftsmanship is more important than “excessive time consumption”. Beyond knock-down capabilities, another benefit of this joint is that it’s effectively invisible – from either end (unlike a half blind sliding dovetail). The Sketchup screen shot I posted above is part of a traditional Japanese toolbox where the only visible joints are a few wedged mortise and tenons. The point is the elegant aesthetic, not how quickly I can make it, and it’s unlikely to ever be knocked down – though there’s a certain pride that comes from knowing that, like temples in Japan and China which have stood for 1000 years, there’s no glue or hardware and therefore it could be disassembled if desired.

-- Founding member of the (un)Official LumberJock's Frugal Woodworking Society - http://lumberjocks.com/topics/29451

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pottz

25793 posts in 2442 days


#11 posted 01-01-2022 03:16 AM

something someone with to much time on their hands and was bored to death decided to create.way to complicated and serves no purpose except to say,i did it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3808 posts in 4096 days


#12 posted 01-01-2022 03:28 AM

C’mon potz, we could all eat on plastic folding tables from Staples, but we waste alot of time making wooden tables.

People spending their time making this sort of thing is better than them sitting around watching the golf channel or whatever. :-)

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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pottz

25793 posts in 2442 days


#13 posted 01-01-2022 04:05 AM



C mon potz, we could all eat on plastic folding tables from Staples, but we waste alot of time making wooden tables.

People spending their time making this sort of thing is better than them sitting around watching the golf channel or whatever. :-)

- Ocelot


lol, yeah ill agree about the golf channel,rather tear my eyes out ! happy new year !

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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chuk

18 posts in 856 days


#14 posted 01-01-2022 04:40 AM


I think it s call a “complicated” joint, which is short for “excessively time consuming” joint.

- xeddog

That was my reaction. What s the point of that joint, exactly?

- jonah
It’s a joint used in Japanese woodworking (where craftsmanship is more important than how long it takes).
- jonah

What s the point of that joint, exactly?

As Sylvain pointed out, the joint, with its no glue, no hardware attributes, is popular in Japanese carpentry where craftsmanship is more important than “excessive time consumption”. Beyond knock-down capabilities, another benefit of this joint is that it’s effectively invisible – from either end (unlike a half blind sliding dovetail). The Sketchup screen shot I posted above is part of a traditional Japanese toolbox where the only visible joints are a few wedged mortise and tenons. The point is the elegant aesthetic, not how quickly I can make it, and it’s unlikely to ever be knocked down – though there’s a certain pride that comes from knowing that, like temples in Japan and China which have stood for 1000 years, there’s no glue or hardware and therefore it could be disassembled if desired.

- DonnyBahama

I’m right there with ya – the pride that comes after the mental gymnastics that are often required to figure out how not to use glue or hardware is something I (perhaps masochistically) enjoy. Happy New Year!

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DonnyBahama

249 posts in 3989 days


#15 posted 01-01-2022 06:35 AM

: )
Happy New Year, Chuk!

-- Founding member of the (un)Official LumberJock's Frugal Woodworking Society - http://lumberjocks.com/topics/29451

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