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Carbide hollowing tool?

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Forum topic by WoodcarvrMtE posted 12-09-2021 04:28 PM 814 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodcarvrMtE

13 posts in 247 days


12-09-2021 04:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question lathe chisel turning

Hello all! I’m looking into purchasing a hollowing tool for my lathe so I can turn hollow forms… I’ve been looking around, and found several different “reputable” brands, but I’m not quite sure if one is better than another. I’m thinking about the 1/2” “crown revolution” hollowing system, but I’m not sure if I should buy a different kind starting out until I get the hang of hollowing? Has anyone ever heard of the crown revolution? Is it worth the price?, or is there a different kind that would work better? Thanks in advance for all your help!


10 replies so far

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HokieKen

21735 posts in 2600 days


#1 posted 12-09-2021 04:50 PM

The adjustable tip makes me nervous on a tool like that. I’d be more inclined to go with a fixed shaft tool like this if I was looking for carbide.

I don’t have a carbide hollowing tool but I use my round carbide tool to rough out the inside as much as I can then I use my Sorby Hollow Master to finish it. The Hollow Master is a good tool but it’s not ideal for heavy cuts and the inserts are HSS not carbide so they need sharpening from time-to-time.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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pottz

25865 posts in 2446 days


#2 posted 12-09-2021 04:51 PM

i cant help you but im gonna follow this because im interested in one myself.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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pottz

25865 posts in 2446 days


#3 posted 12-09-2021 04:53 PM



The adjustable tip makes me nervous on a tool like that. I d be more inclined to go with a fixed shaft tool like this if I was looking for carbide.

I don t have a carbide hollowing tool but I use my round carbide tool to rough out the inside as much as I can then I use my Sorby Hollow Master to finish it. The Hollow Master is a good tool but it s not ideal for heavy cuts and the inserts are HSS not carbide so they need sharpening from time-to-time.

- HokieKen


i just bought that same fixed shaft tool,just barely used it so far.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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woodbutcherbynight

10889 posts in 3870 days


#4 posted 12-09-2021 05:01 PM

Look into Easy Woods line of tools. I have several, they work well.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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LesB

3471 posts in 4905 days


#5 posted 12-09-2021 06:45 PM

I have used a hollowing tool from Munro (from New Zealand) for about 10 years and highly recommend checking it out. Packard woodworks sells them in the US. It has a adjustable cap over the round cutting bit to control the depth of the cut. In my opinion it offers much better control and safety from catches than tools with open cutters.
Here is a 10 year old video of it in use and also how to sharpen the HSS cutters which have since been updated with carbide cutters. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_xhE9dxavo I think the HSS cutters are still available if that is a preference.

I did find another similar design from Pro-Forme Flexi hollower that works with a curved cutter head covered by a cap. It appeared to be less expensive. Also from NZ.

-- Les B, Oregon

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pottz

25865 posts in 2446 days


#6 posted 12-09-2021 07:05 PM



I have used a hollowing tool from Munro (from New Zealand) for about 10 years and highly recommend checking it out. Packard woodworks sells them in the US. It has a adjustable cap over the round cutting bit to control the depth of the cut. In my opinion it offers much better control and safety from catches than tools with open cutters.
Here is a 10 year old video of it in use and also how to sharpen the HSS cutters which have since been updated with carbide cutters. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_xhE9dxavo I think the HSS cutters are still available if that is a preference.

I did find another similar design from Pro-Forme Flexi hollower that works with a curved cutter head covered by a cap. It appeared to be less expensive. Also from NZ.

- LesB


ive been checking out that munro les,i wonder if it’s better than the crown ?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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HokieKen

21735 posts in 2600 days


#7 posted 12-09-2021 07:10 PM

That adjustable cut-limiter is a really good idea. Especially when your working blind like you often are with hollow vessels.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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pottz

25865 posts in 2446 days


#8 posted 12-09-2021 08:22 PM



That adjustable cut-limiter is a really good idea. Especially when your working blind like you often are with hollow vessels.

- HokieKen


yeah kind of wished i had gotten one instead of the fixed shaft tool,seems far safer avoiding catches.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

3039 posts in 3451 days


#9 posted 12-10-2021 05:35 PM

I have done quite a bit of hollowing, from xmas ornament bulb size to 18” tall x 15” dia, and have used all types of tools, though I have not used one of the hooded cutters like Munro or the Woodcut version. I use the smallest opening I can, and the hooded type cutters require a larger opening than the open, smaller cutters I use, and the cutter size is really too large.

Take a look at the tools excellent turners use – David Ellsworth, John Jordan, Trent Bosch, Lyle Jamieson. All have one thing in common – they use small cutters, whether hss or carbide. I know Bosch also has large teardrop cutters for cleaning up the ID, but these are not for actual hollowing.

A small cutter limits the cutting force by limiting the amount of cutting edge, especially important when hollowing blind, even more so when going deep.

I use both hand held and a captive system from Lyle Jamieson. I make all of my hand held using mild steel bar from the bbs. A 4” hand grinder, some files, drill and tap, a propane torch, and a vice and you can make them fairly easily. Mine are 3/8” and 1/2” dia bar. I use 8.9 mm dia carbide cutters – doesnt sound like much of difference between that size and a 1/2”/12mm cutter, but it is – much more than you would think. The only smaller cutter I have found is 6mm with a cup, too grabby for hand held. Can also use 3/16” square hss tool bits like the turners listed above. I use both for the captive system.

Rule of thumb for handle length is 4-5x the tool rest hang off distance – its a good rule to follow. I dont go over ~5” by hand – thats what the captive system is for.

Hollowing is definitely it’s own niche. Depends a lot on what one intends to make to determine tool selection. The bigger the entry hole the easier it is and the broader the tool possibilities, and the same with depth – the deeper you go the tougher it gets.

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zorro9

15 posts in 589 days


#10 posted 12-16-2021 02:50 AM

Adding to OSU5 you can use steering wheel shafts if u choose to make yr owm. This shaft has 2 paralell flats.

https://www.amazon.com/Allstar-ALL52175-0-750-Double-Steering/dp/B006K8N8WS/ref=asc_df_B006K8N8WS/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312114638100&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9263269803193388790&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9030154&hvtargid=pla-632659133717&psc=1

Alternate route is Penn state Industries has a set that wont break the bank but it is for smaller pieces.

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