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Forum topic by Karda posted 12-08-2021 12:09 PM 563 views 3 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

3382 posts in 1886 days


12-08-2021 12:09 PM

need advice on making thin strip


20 replies so far

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2875 posts in 880 days


#1 posted 12-08-2021 01:03 PM

See my projects page, page three, thin-stock rip jig. Safest way to do it, IMO.

-- WWBBJ: It is better to be interesting and wrong, than boring and right.

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Lazyman

8781 posts in 2720 days


#2 posted 12-08-2021 01:59 PM

How long do they need to be? If they are not too long, I like this approach from Woodsmith because you don’t have to set the fence more than once but it also doesn’t trap the strip between the fence and blade.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3719 posts in 3971 days


#3 posted 12-08-2021 02:59 PM

Lazy,

That looks nice, simple and obvious now that I’ve seen it.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View Davevand's profile

Davevand

313 posts in 2169 days


#4 posted 12-08-2021 03:46 PM



How long do they need to be? If they are not too long, I like this approach from Woodsmith because you don t have to set the fence more than once but it also doesn t trap the strip between the fence and blade.

- Lazyman

I use this jig and it works great for me, never have to move the fence and easily repeatable this strips.

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987Ron

2676 posts in 649 days


#5 posted 12-08-2021 04:04 PM

Ditto on the above, use it myself.

-- Ron

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8781 posts in 2720 days


#6 posted 12-08-2021 04:06 PM

I agree Ocelot. When I first saw it in a Woodsmith Magazine, it was so obvious that I was surprised I had not seen it before.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Ocelot

3719 posts in 3971 days


#7 posted 12-08-2021 04:10 PM

If you read the short article linked above, you learn the one other thing – that you use different thickness spacer boards depending on what you are doing.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8781 posts in 2720 days


#8 posted 12-08-2021 04:23 PM

To make sure that they are exactly the same thickness, you could simply attach a piece of the same stock with double sided tape, if you don’t want to drill holes in it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Andre's profile

Andre

4998 posts in 3139 days


#9 posted 12-08-2021 05:11 PM

Dang, something else I have to build now!:) He says after cutting some splines yesterday?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

9511 posts in 3598 days


#10 posted 12-08-2021 05:48 PM

I agree with Andre. I might just have to make something like that.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

6256 posts in 4576 days


#11 posted 12-08-2021 08:25 PM



How long do they need to be? If they are not too long, I like this approach from Woodsmith because you don t have to set the fence more than once but it also doesn t trap the strip between the fence and blade.

- Lazyman

That looks like a good jig, but just how thin can you go with it? In my model making, I use wood as thin as 1/32”.

View bugradx2's profile

bugradx2

396 posts in 1352 days


#12 posted 12-08-2021 08:31 PM

this may be overly obvious but if you need something 1/32” thick then the table saw may not be what you ought to look for. Even a thin rip blade will turn a lot more than 1/32 into dust with every rip. You may want to look at a band saw with a big blade so it can’t flex.

-- The only thing not measured in my shop is time

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8781 posts in 2720 days


#13 posted 12-09-2021 04:08 AM

When I want to be extra stingy cutting thin strips on the table saw, I will sometimes use an ultra-thin 7” circular saw blade to minimize kerf loss.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4833 posts in 2813 days


#14 posted 12-09-2021 12:41 PM

That push block jig is going to trap the last part of the strip between the blade and shoe fence seems to me that would affect the surface.

How thin? That’s the question. Also, is material loss an issue?

Thinner than 1/8” I use a bandsaw but you don’t get as good a surface, so I combine with a drum sander.

If you don’t have a drum sander, you either need a carbide blade or a bench plane thicknessing jig.

As lazyman said, note: will not work on a SawStop.

I learned all this cutting kumiko strips.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Davevand's profile

Davevand

313 posts in 2169 days


#15 posted 12-09-2021 04:36 PM



That push block jig is going to trap the last part of the strip between the blade and shoe fence seems to me that would affect the surface.

How thin? That’s the question. Also, is material loss an issue?

Thinner than 1/8” I use a bandsaw but you don’t get as good a surface, so I combine with a drum sander.

If you don’t have a drum sander, you either need a carbide blade or a bench plane thicknessing jig.

As lazyman said, note: will not work on a SawStop.

I learned all this cutting kumiko strips.

- Robert


The little piece of wood at the back of the jig is replaceable so you always push the strip thru. I keep my scrap 3mm plywood and make the push pieces , tape them to the top of my jig so I always have some. Also since none of my ZCI are perfectly zero I put down a piece of tape, run the blade up thru it to get a ZCI for this job. If waste is an issue I use a 7-1/4 Diablo saw blade, it has a very thin kerf and leaves a very nice edge.

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