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Dewalt Miter Saw Squaring

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Forum topic by Ksirp posted 12-07-2021 06:11 PM 435 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ksirp

26 posts in 1802 days


12-07-2021 06:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tool miter saw

Hello, so I have run threw all that I have researched on the internet of figuring out how to square my miter saw blade. I have a dewalt 779. When I put my digital angle finder on the blade itself it reads 89.4 degrees. Just enough to throw off my cuts. I’ve spent hours trying to get that blade perfectly 90 degrees and I just can’t. Any advice on this?? Or has anyone else had this issue?


15 replies so far

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therealSteveN

9403 posts in 1916 days


#1 posted 12-07-2021 06:29 PM

It’s highly possible the thing you are trying to fix, already is where you want it to be. IE: the blade is set at 90 degrees. What is out of order is the screwed in little red indicator you are trying to see as a POINTING exactly at 90, has been screwed in the wrong place, been bent, or some other mass manufactured goof that has what you are looking at is not what it says it is. Or you have a crap measuring device.

First set the saw to where it says it’s 90, make a crosscut, and using one of these (see below) see if it is 90 (fits tight) or if you see gaps, light between the square, and the wood.

If that checks as being a good 90, pitch the digital whatever.

If it doesn’t and it looks like the digital angle finder is OK, then bend that red indicator so it points at 90. After doing that check it to see if 45’s don’t act right too. If not return the saw, and keep the digital angle finder.

What I am saying is never trust a single measuring device to tell you something, all that matters is what the cut looks like. If the cut is wrong the tool needs adjustment. If the first measuring device says a good cut is bad, pitch or fix the measuring device. While setting up tools it’s best to use a few tools to see if they AGREE you are done setting up. ALSO a good reason to buy the best quality measuring device you can.

-- Think safe, be safe

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sansoo22

1972 posts in 996 days


#2 posted 12-07-2021 07:52 PM

I’ve owned 3 DeWalts now and haven’t had this issue with any of them. The DWS780 and DW716XPS I believe align the same way as the 779.

This bolt thingy

Turn the bolt to the right and it moves the head left, turn bolt left and it moves the head right. You have to loosen the carriage lock in the rear or it won’t allow for very fine adjustments. A little bit of movement on the bolt goes a long way. When you get it exactly where you want lock it back down and make sure it hasn’t moved on you.

Placement of a digital angle gauge can get thrown off depending on where you put it in my experience. I slap mine on so its touching the metal around the arbor and then drag it straight down above the teeth. I find that gives me the most accurate reading.

But as Steven mentioned I still double check every cut with a square up to a bright shop light to make sure its accurate. I use the angle gauge as my starting point and dial in with test cuts and a square after that.

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Madmark2

3264 posts in 1930 days


#3 posted 12-07-2021 08:01 PM

When using an angle cube measure both sides and split the difference.

Some saw blades are not flat, but are dished, thinner in the middle, wider on the edge. This means that neither side can be plumbed! You might find both sides read 89.4°!

Take readings until both sides are equal and you’ll be as plumb as possible. The same issue will show up with your tri-square.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Rich

7756 posts in 1931 days


#4 posted 12-07-2021 09:07 PM


When using an angle cube measure both sides and split the difference.

- Madmark2

The angle measurements from each side of the blade will always add up to 180º, which tells you nothing about whether it’s square to the top.

One thing I haven’t seen mentioned that’s critical is to be sure you’re measuring the relative angle of the blade to the top. Set the angle gauge on the surface of the saw and zero it before attaching it to the side of the blade.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

5085 posts in 1247 days


#5 posted 12-07-2021 09:29 PM

I had various struggles with mine until I found this series and did all of these adjustments. Watch all of them and follow along. It doesn’t matter if your blade is perfectly 90 degrees if the wood sinks or twists on the table as its cutting. ALL of these parts work together to give you a finished result.

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=altzfLyLSvc

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Madmark2

3264 posts in 1930 days


#6 posted 12-07-2021 10:09 PM

Rich: No, on a concave plate both sides will not read 90°. This is why I said read both sides. They may NOT add up to 180°—proving the BLADE is concave and the sides TAPER instead of being parallel!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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LeeRoyMan

2398 posts in 1069 days


#7 posted 12-07-2021 10:18 PM

Rich: No, on a concave plate both sides will not read 90°. This is why I said read both sides. They may NOT add up to 180°—proving the BLADE is concave and the sides TAPER instead of being parallel!

- Madmark2


I have NEVER, in my life, heard of a tapered/concave saw blade plate. Can you give a reference? Always willing to learn.

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Madmark2

3264 posts in 1930 days


#8 posted 12-07-2021 10:39 PM

You’ve not heard “hollow ground”? It reduces the mass of the blade and helps not bind in the kerf.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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LeeRoyMan

2398 posts in 1069 days


#9 posted 12-07-2021 10:53 PM



You ve not heard “hollow ground”? It reduces the mass of the blade and helps not bind in the kerf.

- Madmark2


Yes, I have some hollow ground blades, referring to the tips, not the plate.
Used to use them for cutting melamine.

Maybe you can show me what you’re talking about.

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Madmark2

3264 posts in 1930 days


#10 posted 12-07-2021 11:13 PM

From Lowes:

Circular Saw Blades Buying Guide | Lowe’s

Hollow-ground blades have a body that’s thinner than the teeth — a design intended to help keep the blade from becoming pinched in the work piece.

This is a high dollar Amana. note the lack of swirls near the edge where it ISN’T ground (full thickness) The two set of swirles in the center are the “hollow” grind – thinner than the edge. This is a step grind, others grind a taper.

Here’s another:

Again note the lack of grinding marks at the rim, but the center has been hollowed out. Most blades have been hollow ground and you probably never noticed. Search for TS blades and any with grinding marks in the center, but not the edge, are “hollow ground”.

Tips too can be “hollow ground”, but the thing that throws squaring your blade off is the center hollow grind.

Note how the face of this dado set is dead flat to maintain dado dimensions.

This is why just stacking multiple regular blades makes a crappy dado set. The dished centers causes the tips to splay out when the center nut is tightened.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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LeeRoyMan

2398 posts in 1069 days


#11 posted 12-07-2021 11:45 PM

Yes, plates can be of different thicknesses, though the plates I have seen have a thicker inner and the outside is thinner, limiting the depth of the cut.
.
.

”proving the BLADE is concave and the sides TAPER instead of being parallel!”

^^ Still looking for facts of this^^
.
.

Got the number for that Amana blade? I would like to look it up.

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Madmark2

3264 posts in 1930 days


#12 posted 12-08-2021 12:00 AM

If the angle cube straddles the ground and unground areas, or the step in the grinds, the angle read will be off is the point, AND you can’t guarantee parallelism.

I’m not talking out my a$$, I’ve had the same alignment issue and only found it when my square, when tight to a gullet, showed increasing hairlines of light on BOTH SIDES!

Sansoo22 mentioned the same thing without realizing it when he said:

Placement of a digital angle gauge can get thrown off depending on where you put it in my experience. I slap mine on so its touching the metal around the arbor and then drag it straight down above the teeth. I find that gives me the most accurate reading.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

7756 posts in 1931 days


#13 posted 12-08-2021 12:19 AM

Funny there’s no reference to a hollow grind on the DeWalt blade, probably because there is no hollow grind. It would be pointless anyway, since it’s the width of the teeth relative to the thickness of the plate that keeps it from binding.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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LeeRoyMan

2398 posts in 1069 days


#14 posted 12-08-2021 12:27 AM


If the angle cube straddles the ground and unground areas, or the step in the grinds, the angle read will be off is the point, AND you can t guarantee parallelism.

- Madmark2


Of course, you can’t put the angle cube on a stepped plate.
But you said tapered, and you said concave.

That is what I have never seen.
Until you, or someone else, can show me literature on concaved/tapered plates I stand by my ignorance.

Anyway, enough from me,

Hopefully the OP didn’t mind the detour,
and can get the thread back on track to find a solution to his problem.

View SMP's profile

SMP

5085 posts in 1247 days


#15 posted 12-08-2021 01:07 AM

If the angle cube straddles the ground and unground areas, or the step in the grinds, the angle read will be off is the point, AND you can t guarantee parallelism.

- Madmark2

Of course, you can t put the angle cube on a stepped plate.
But you said tapered, and you said concave.

That is what I have never seen.
Until you, or someone else, can show me literature on concaved/tapered plates I stand by my ignorance.

Anyway, enough from me,

Hopefully the OP didn t mind the detour,
and can get the thread back on track to find a solution to his problem.

- LeeRoyMan

I think he is confusing hollow geind circular/table saw blades with holow ground hand saws. Some hand saws have “hollow ground” or tapered plates to prevent binding. But whenever I have seen circular saws/table/miter saw blades reference “hollow ground” they are talking about the teeth, like a hollow ground raker teeth on melamine blades, where the cutting edge of the raker is concave.

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