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dust collection static pressure loss from vertical rise

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Forum topic by OxfordChipper posted 12-06-2021 01:14 AM 445 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OxfordChipper

23 posts in 464 days


12-06-2021 01:14 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collection static pressure loss

All, I’ve been reading up on dust collection systems as I go about planning one for my basement (sigh) shop. In none of the materials I have read thus far discuss the static pressure loss from a vertical rise. There would be a vertical rise of 5-7 feet (typically) from the dust port on a machine up to the main duct. Do I need to account for that in my calculations?

TIA for your help.


4 replies so far

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ibewjon

2748 posts in 4128 days


#1 posted 12-06-2021 02:32 AM

I ran my 5” duct about 3’ high around the walls. Not much vertical in most of my system. I do rise up to the 10’ ceiling to pass over a door, but did not figure in any loss for it. I have no complaints about the results.

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Rich

7748 posts in 1924 days


#2 posted 12-06-2021 03:25 AM


All, I ve been reading up on dust collection systems as I go about planning one for my basement (sigh) shop. In none of the materials I have read thus far discuss the static pressure loss from a vertical rise. There would be a vertical rise of 5-7 feet (typically) from the dust port on a machine up to the main duct. Do I need to account for that in my calculations?

TIA for your help.

- OxfordChipper

That’s referred to as head—the pressure due to the specific weight of the fluid. In the case of air, the specific weight is negligible, so the pressure loss is also negligible.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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JohnDon

212 posts in 2504 days


#3 posted 12-07-2021 12:28 AM

According to the venerable Mr. Pentz, you need 4000 fpm air speed for adequate dust movement in a vertical drop. For a 6 inch duct, that equates to about 800 cfm, and about 550 cfm for 5 inch duct. [fpm x duct cross sectional area = cfm]. The length of the drop (other than the performance cost of long runs due to friction) is irrelevant; the speed of the air exiting the top of the drop has to be identical to the speed of the air entering the bottom.

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OxfordChipper

23 posts in 464 days


#4 posted 12-07-2021 03:01 PM

Thanks for the input. I’m sure I will have further questions as I get deeper into design and construction…

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