LumberJocks

3/4 clamp thread protection

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Tunester posted 12-05-2021 03:01 AM 687 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Tunester's profile

Tunester

5 posts in 85 days


12-05-2021 03:01 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have 3/4 black pipe and Bessey pipe clamps. I had the pipe cut and threaded to a few different lengths when I bought it. I’d like to get something to protect the threads like the orange plastic (?) pieces that came with the original 10’ pieces. Any ideas where to pick some up. Store didn’t have extras lying around


22 replies so far

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

5001 posts in 4439 days


#1 posted 12-05-2021 03:39 AM

Maybe just use Co-Therm, that stuff that holds on a cotton ball after you have blood drawn? I use it on my Flex-Cut knife handles, because they are so slick when new. It’s certainly cheap enough.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View RetiredRonnie's profile

RetiredRonnie

29 posts in 70 days


#2 posted 12-05-2021 03:45 AM

View WoodES's profile

WoodES

202 posts in 3021 days


#3 posted 12-05-2021 04:46 AM

Pick up some threaded PVC 3/4 caps. Typically found in the big box plumbing section.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8755 posts in 2718 days


#4 posted 12-05-2021 05:40 AM

Maybe just use some Plasti-dip. You could even put some hot glue on the threads to protect them or even just wrap them with tape.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Tunester's profile

Tunester

5 posts in 85 days


#5 posted 12-05-2021 06:01 AM



Maybe just use Co-Therm, that stuff that holds on a cotton ball after you have blood drawn? I use it on my Flex-Cut knife handles, because they are so slick when new. It s certainly cheap enough.

- Dark_Lightning

I didn’t even think of going this way. I have some lying around I picked up at a feed store. They call it Vet Wrap. Twice the size and half the cost of what you buy in a pharmacy.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3247 posts in 1919 days


#6 posted 12-05-2021 09:34 AM

Google TUBING THREAD PROTECTORS

Found them HERE

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2745 posts in 4124 days


#7 posted 12-05-2021 12:20 PM

I put pipe couplings on the threads. Use conduit couplings which have straight threads and screw on and off easier. If I want to couple two pipes for a longer clamp, I am ready to go. You don’t need plumbing caps or couplings with tapered threads. They are harder to install and remove. And remember that the OD of the pipe is 1 1/8”.

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

346 posts in 1575 days


#8 posted 12-05-2021 01:52 PM

I use pipe couplings also—an added feature is that when you need a longer clamp, you already have the part on hand to connect two pipes!

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1473 posts in 1241 days


#9 posted 12-05-2021 10:28 PM

What I use to protect the 1/2” and 3/4” pipe clamp ends are rubber furniture tips. Same as the rubber tips you use on stools. They come in different sizes. Costs less than $2 for pack of four. https://www.menards.com/main/hardware/casters-furniture-hardware/furniture-pads-grips-tips/shepherd-hardware-reg-black-rubber-furniture-tips-4-pack/9126/p-1444442242300.htm

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

30405 posts in 4014 days


#10 posted 12-06-2021 01:23 AM

So….what happened to those red caps the pipe was sold with, in the first place? That the stores have on the threads to protect the threads while in the rack…..? If the person doing the cut & threading takes them off, you can ask to have them back….they might even have a box where they throw away the caps….for free…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2745 posts in 4124 days


#11 posted 12-06-2021 02:24 AM

A 10’ stick of pipe comes with two caps, and none for the extra threads. The caps don’t always come off easily, so we always cut them, making them useless. If not planning on coupling lengths of pipe, the other end does not need threads, only reaming to make it safer.

View klassenl's profile

klassenl

220 posts in 3990 days


#12 posted 12-06-2021 02:48 AM

Why do you need this?

-- When questioned about using glue on a garbage bin I responded, "Wood working is about good technique and lots of glue........I have the glue part down."

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

346 posts in 1575 days


#13 posted 12-06-2021 02:58 PM

Don’t know about the OP, but for me it’s to protect the threads when the pipes are stood up against the wall and the threads are on the concrete floor. If they get bumped around it can damage the threads and make it difficult to add a coupling to extend the length.

I would imagine that if one had nice wooden floors, even non-threaded ends could mar the surface. That sounds odd, doesn’t it? but I’ve seen workshops set up in spare bedrooms indoors, so it could happen!

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3192 posts in 932 days


#14 posted 12-06-2021 05:58 PM

I’ll bet you could go to the rack (box) with the various pipe sizes in it and find all the caps you need floating around in the bottom. Just clean it up for them.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

7949 posts in 3051 days


#15 posted 12-06-2021 06:59 PM

Electrical tape.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com