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Please help me identify this vise

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Forum topic by Jimbo26 posted 12-03-2021 08:49 PM 423 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jimbo26

17 posts in 83 days


12-03-2021 08:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: vise

I just bought this vise for $25.00 to replace a light duty vise on my workbench that I’ve had for many years.
I liked it because it is heavy, rugged, and seems to be in good condition.
I’m considering doing a light refurbish on it, but I’m curious about who made this vise and when.

There are no markings on it other than “V20” cast into it below one of the jaws, “V21” cast below the other jaw, and “V22” cast into the bottom.

Any ideas?

-- Jim, IL


10 replies so far

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Aj2

4221 posts in 3131 days


#1 posted 12-03-2021 08:55 PM

Looks like a great vise. I don’t know who made hopefully it’s not someone your family’s been feuding with for generations. And you get keep it. :)
Good Luck

-- Aj

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splintergroup

6330 posts in 2555 days


#2 posted 12-03-2021 09:29 PM

Can’t help with the ID, but can appreciate that the pivot lock lever is not bent. Every vise I have with one has had that part bent from using a section of pipe for leverage. Seems one cannot beat the crap out of something without that part being very secure 8^)

Either way, looks like an oldie so probably a goody!

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

525 posts in 3174 days


#3 posted 12-03-2021 11:17 PM

At first glance I thought of Dunlap vises, but with consideration I think it is a Wilton. I will give a picture of an old Wilton, see what you think, Clarkie.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

2200 posts in 1772 days


#4 posted 12-04-2021 12:44 AM

Doesn’t happen to be anything stamped into the end of the screw is there?

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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sansoo22

1972 posts in 987 days


#5 posted 12-04-2021 01:09 AM

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Jimbo26

17 posts in 83 days


#6 posted 12-04-2021 04:25 AM

Thank you sansoo22.
Yep, there’s no badge/decal on this guy, but based on your links, it’s a Milwaukee Tool Co. vise, perhaps sold as Wards Power Kraft.

I admit I’m somewhat disappointed it’s not anything wonderful, but for my purposes it’s a step upwards from the rather puny vise that this is replacing. I’ll clean it up, bolt it down and see how I like it.

Thanks to all who responded.

-- Jim, IL

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Jimbo26

17 posts in 83 days


#7 posted 12-04-2021 04:56 AM

BTW, after following more links, it looks like this may be a Milwaukee #807.
I’ve read that the Wards Powr Kraft vises were painted green.
Since this one is red, I guess I’ll assume it’s was branded as Milwaukee.
Thanks again to all.

-- Jim, IL

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BlasterStumps

2200 posts in 1772 days


#8 posted 12-04-2021 07:42 PM

Looks like a really nice old vise. Good find.

I enjoyed fixing this one up. I found it at a small tool sale. It resides in my workshop now. Older vises just seem to have a certain charm about them.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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Jimbo26

17 posts in 83 days


#9 posted 12-06-2021 09:49 PM

BlasterStumps: That is one nice looking vise. I’d be very proud of that.

I felt that mine wasn’t worth that level of attention, but I wanted to spend some time fixing up a few issues with this vise and making it look at least somewhat respectable.
So I spent several hours this past weekend with the wire wheel, belt sander, and paint rehabbing this vise.

One problem I knew I wanted to try to fix was that the body (with the fixed jaw) did not turn easily on the swivel base plate, and when I took this vise apart, I found out why. The bottom of the body, which sits on the base, was rough and irregular. In fact, it had a hump or ridge across the bottom, causing it to rest on the swivel base on just two points so that it would rock from side to side if the swivel clamp was not screwed down. It was obvious that the manufacturer made no attempt to smooth out these mating surfaces. I spent a lot of time with the belt sander and hand sanding to smooth things out so that it now swivels more smoothly, I’m sure better than new.

The anvil surface was dished in the middle and had many nicks and scratches, so more effort with the belt sander and then scraping with a flat file to flatten the surface as best as I could. More hand sanding on this with finer sandpaper grits got the anvil surface looking respectable.

After every surface was scrubbed, I masked off the areas I didn’t want to paint, and then sprayed everything with 5 coats of black ceramic engine paint.
I used a paste wax to lubricate the screw.
Because my workbench space is so limited, I mounted this on a board so that I can remove it from the benchtop when I don’t need it.

Now it’s time to put it to work.

-- Jim, IL

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BlasterStumps

2200 posts in 1772 days


#10 posted 12-07-2021 04:03 AM

It looks great Jim. Nice work. I like the black on that one. It made it look very nice.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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