LumberJocks

Table Top Glue Up

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by lblankenship posted 12-03-2021 02:48 AM 387 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View lblankenship's profile

lblankenship

56 posts in 1607 days


12-03-2021 02:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: milling jointer planer table saw rough lumber table table top glue up

Hey Everyone,

Just curious to hear if you rip each of your boards to the same width when milling for a table top or if you rip to the largest size for each board to reduce waste.

Thanks!


10 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4221 posts in 3131 days


#1 posted 12-03-2021 02:55 AM

I sometimes rip boards for a table top to get a place in the grain that looks good next to it’s partners.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3253 posts in 1921 days


#2 posted 12-03-2021 03:06 AM

appearance and yield.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Rich's profile

Rich

7744 posts in 1922 days


#3 posted 12-03-2021 03:49 AM

To my eye—and I stress that this is just my opinion—I like to see either equal width pieces, or symmetry. Random widths jump out and look cheap—again, that’s just my opinion.

There’s more to it though. As was mentioned before, the grain needs to have some consistency. Mixing rift or quarter sawn boards among plain sawn ones with cathedral grain looks odd too.

Frankly, I like the look of book matched pieces best. I much prefer to get 8/4 stock and re-saw it for things like door panels and table tops.

I did that for the panels in this door. I really like the look.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8781 posts in 2720 days


#4 posted 12-03-2021 12:26 PM

If you can get a good grain match, you can sometimes hide the joints and the width is less important. If you do have different widths, it usually looks better if you put the wider boards in the middle and the narrower ones on either side and make the narrower boards about same width on either side, basically symetrical—like you did it on purpose. If it looks haphazard, people will think you bought the table a Walmart.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7353 posts in 3826 days


#5 posted 12-03-2021 12:38 PM

I can’t remember ever ripping them to a consistent width. But I spend a fair amount of time looking at the grain and getting it to match as best I can. I’ve also followed the “wider boards in the middle” when possible, but grain matching comes first.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

6256 posts in 4576 days


#6 posted 12-03-2021 06:30 PM

When making table tops, you will have to rely on butt joints which never line up perfectly. Better to use oversize boards, joint and butt using dowels, biscuits, T&G, etc; then finish the top for a smooth/level surface by sanding.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4221 posts in 3131 days


#7 posted 12-03-2021 08:58 PM



To my eye—and I stress that this is just my opinion—I like to see either equal width pieces, or symmetry. Random widths jump out and look cheap—again, that s just my opinion.

There s more to it though. As was mentioned before, the grain needs to have some consistency. Mixing rift or quarter sawn boards among plain sawn ones with cathedral grain looks odd too.

Frankly, I like the look of book matched pieces best. I much prefer to get 8/4 stock and re-saw it for things like door panels and table tops.

I did that for the panels in this door. I really like the look.

- Rich

Nice door Rich lots of character !
Alder?

-- Aj

View lblankenship's profile

lblankenship

56 posts in 1607 days


#8 posted 12-03-2021 09:04 PM

Thanks everyone! I usually cut my boards to equal width when building a top. However, this time I’m building a table from a tree that a client had milled on their property. I’m going to be cutting it close with giving them the size table they want with their lumber which is why I was curious to see what others do. If I cut them all down to similar widths I definitely won’t have enough yield for the top.

View Rich's profile

Rich

7744 posts in 1922 days


#9 posted 12-03-2021 10:09 PM


Nice door Rich lots of character !
Alder?

- Aj2

Thanks, Aj. Yes, it is alder.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Rich's profile

Rich

7744 posts in 1922 days


#10 posted 12-03-2021 10:11 PM


Thanks everyone! I usually cut my boards to equal width when building a top. However, this time I m building a table from a tree that a client had milled on their property. I m going to be cutting it close with giving them the size table they want with their lumber which is why I was curious to see what others do. If I cut them all down to similar widths I definitely won t have enough yield for the top.

- lblankenship

Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. I thought you were asking about best practices, but there are no hard and fast rules about anything I wrote earlier.

Do your best to get a good grain pattern and it’ll look great.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com