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Difference between $50 and $150 table saw blade

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Forum topic by Oakfan posted 12-02-2021 01:49 PM 1195 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Oakfan

41 posts in 4367 days


12-02-2021 01:49 PM

Are expensive blades worth the money and WHY ????

-- It's not the breaths U take but the moments that take your breath away !!


31 replies so far

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CaptainKlutz

5147 posts in 2825 days


#1 posted 12-02-2021 03:37 PM

1) Please read this blog post: Tips for Picking Saw Blades

2) The question is too vague and open ended. Can not pick saw blades by cost alone.
Which blades are looking at? Have never seen a $150 24TPI rip blade? Have seen all kinds of $150 100TPI laminate blades.

3)Generically speaking;
Better blades (which are usually more expensive) have thicker, better quality carbide edges, and better plate design to run cooler/quieter. This allows them to stay sharp longer, and tolerate more sharpening cycles before replacement. Some expensive blades can have special tooth geometry with more ‘facets’, which can improve cut quality in some types of cuts.
IMHO – better quality blades are important if you want consistent glue ready edges, and less edge sanding. At same time, if you have a ‘job site’ saw with poor blade to fence alignment; buying an expensive blade is waste of money. Which makes picking a blade more than ‘how much does it cost’.

Have used all kinds of blades. Have 24T Rip blades, 40 TPI general purpose blades, 50/60 TPI Combo blades, and 80-100 TPI veneer plywood/laminate blades. My current favorite GP blade is Tenryu GM-25540 40 TPI. Also have an inexpensive Delta 35-7657 40TPI ($20 on closeout) for less critical work. They both cut well, but Tenryu leaves a smoother finish with almost zero burning with rip cut. The Delta is a bit of an odd ball as it has thicker carbide than most cheap blades, making it a great value for general purpose blade. The Tenryu performs better than my Forest WWII ever did, which has not been used since I bought Tenryu blade.
Like all subjective comparisons, YMMV.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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bbc557ci

670 posts in 3405 days


#2 posted 12-02-2021 03:48 PM

Freud Glue line rip blades work well in my older Unisaw. $65.00’ish.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

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LeeRoyMan

2375 posts in 1057 days


#3 posted 12-02-2021 05:27 PM



Are expensive blades worth the money and WHY ????

- Oakfan


I’m no expert so without going into a lot of detail,

Yes expensive blades are worth it overall.
As Capt said, there are reasons to have cheap blades as well.

Typical expensive blades have plates made with better steel, have better controls on flatness during production,
including heat treating and tensioning. Closer tolerances for run out.
Expansion joints in the plate for better heat distribution, also make blades quieter and run cooler.

The carbide tips are made from different combinations of metals, not just the old standard C-4
Generally, they are thicker than cheaper blades, and you can resharpen them more times.
The manganese brazing of the tips is better.

More expensive blades have better quality control than an off-the-line production blade.

Add everything together and you have blades that will stay sharper longer, run cooler and quieter,
cut cleaner and will get more sharpenings out of them.

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pottz

22244 posts in 2315 days


#4 posted 12-02-2021 06:09 PM

ive used cheap blades and ive used expensive blades and ive always found much better cuts with a good quality blade.you get what you pay for.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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LesB

3232 posts in 4774 days


#5 posted 12-02-2021 06:10 PM

As usual Capt Klutz does a thorough write up on the question.

I have both types. Without a doubt the more expensive blades will be all around better; my top choice is a Forest which I primarily use for cross grain cutting on my Radial Arm saw. It produces “polished” cuts.
My “everyday” blade on my table saw is Freud 10” 50t thin combination which is priced in the middle range. I have two and they have both been sharpened twice and have enough carbide left for one or two more sharpenings. I get very smooth rip cuts and good crosscuts with them. I also have some old Craftsman carbide tipped blades that I use for cutting rough, dirty, or possibly nail embedded stuff….they are expendable at this point.

Of course even the best blades can’t produce well if the saw is not set up properly.

-- Les B, Oregon

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SMP

5049 posts in 1236 days


#6 posted 12-02-2021 06:10 PM

I always keep a $30 diablo blade from Home Depot handy for cutting questionable wood that may have nails/staples, grit etc. or for rough milling etc.

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Kelly

3899 posts in 4275 days


#7 posted 12-03-2021 01:34 AM

Thanks for the lead on Tenryu blades. Looked at them and debated buying on on my last purchase.

I went another route and it’s okay. Key is, I wanted standard kerf for a more stability in my cuts.


[T]hey both cut well, but Tenryu leaves a smoother finish with almost zero burning with rip cut. The Delta is a bit of an odd ball as it has thicker carbide than most cheap blades, making it a great value for general purpose blade. The Tenryu performs better than my Forest WWII ever did, which has not been used since I bought Tenryu blade.
Like all subjective comparisons, YMMV.
- CaptainKlutz

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9130 posts in 3907 days


#8 posted 12-03-2021 02:16 AM

Generally speaking you get a better grade of carbide and more of it on expensive blades.

The benefits outweigh the costs.

View Oakfan's profile

Oakfan

41 posts in 4367 days


#9 posted 12-03-2021 02:24 AM

Thanks for the replies and advice, much appreciated. The reason for the post was I saw an Ad for The Ridge Carbide super blade. I have used Freud blades, Diablo’s, Craftsman, Dewalt etc. I have never owned an expensive blade such as Forest. So I wanted some experienced knowledgeable advice. Any reviews on Ridge Carbide would be appreciated. CaptianKlutz, I will check out the Tenryu blades. Thanks

-- It's not the breaths U take but the moments that take your breath away !!

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SMP

5049 posts in 1236 days


#10 posted 12-03-2021 02:27 AM



Thanks for the replies and advice, much appreciated. The reason for the post was I saw an Ad for The Ridge Carbide super blade. I have used Freud blades, Diablo s, Craftsman, Dewalt etc. I have never owned an expensive blade such as Forest. So I wanted some experienced knowledgeable advice. Any reviews on Ridge Carbide would be appreciated. CaptianKlutz, I will check out the Tenryu blades. Thanks

- Oakfan

You sort of gave extremes in your minimum and maximum. But, there are “good value” blades in the $65-85 range, like some of the Amana line and Tenryu etc. but generally speaking a good quality blade can be sharpened 2-3 times where cheap blades become throwing stars.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2375 posts in 1057 days


#11 posted 12-03-2021 02:41 AM

My favorite Tenryu blade,
https://tenryusawblades.com/product.php?productid=17974
I have a lot of them and don’t count how many sharpenings I get, but I can guarantee it’s at least 6

View DaveM123's profile

DaveM123

113 posts in 624 days


#12 posted 12-03-2021 02:53 AM

I’ve used the Forrest Woodworker II for years. Woodworking is a hobby for me so I am not always in the shop. I get good crosscuts and rips with this blade. Expensive yes but worth it for me.

-- Dave

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Knockonit

1063 posts in 1533 days


#13 posted 12-03-2021 12:38 PM

have been using the glue line from freud i believe, great blade, although does dull after considerable use, i would have thought it might have stayed sharp longer, although i could have mis counted how much we cut with it, hehe, i generally spend a lot of time at saw at once, get everything cut up and stacked, which allows me to assemble at an easy pace, and leave table saw for extra work space. but…...........there is always that one piece. lol
rj in az

-- Living the dream

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Dark_Lightning

5001 posts in 4439 days


#14 posted 12-03-2021 04:03 PM

Thanks for the replies and advice, much appreciated. The reason for the post was I saw an Ad for The Ridge Carbide super blade. I have used Freud blades, Diablo s, Craftsman, Dewalt etc. I have never owned an expensive blade such as Forest. So I wanted some experienced knowledgeable advice. Any reviews on Ridge Carbide would be appreciated. CaptianKlutz, I will check out the Tenryu blades. Thanks

- Oakfan

You sort of gave extremes in your minimum and maximum. But, there are “good value” blades in the $65-85 range, like some of the Amana line and Tenryu etc. but generally speaking a good quality blade can be sharpened 2-3 times where cheap blades become throwing stars.

- SMP

That’d a scary thought, but the next time I replace a blade, I’ll use my circular saw to make a notch on a cabinet, somewhere in line with my table saw blade and mount the old blade there. That ought to be good for a conversation or two.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View Robert's profile

Robert

4827 posts in 2811 days


#15 posted 12-03-2021 08:05 PM

I think there is a difference, the question is, within the parameters of your budge, how much the blade is used, and truthfully, whether you just top quality machines and blades.

My only experience is with Freud, CMT, and Forrest. I have a couple crosscut blades that my sharpening service believes are Amana, nonetheless, they are very good I wish I knew what brand they are.

Subjectively, the difference I notice is:

—Edge retention top to bottom:
1. Forrest
2. CMT
3. Freud (a distant 3rd).

—Quality of cut:

1. The Forrest is a 40T, by far the best blade I have. I had it sharpened by Forrest and it does seem to be better than my local sharpener, I don’t know if its the blade or the sharpening method.

2. CMT. 24T Rip, SMS 12” I’ve always had good luck with these, IMO a better blade than Freud for similar money, and sometimes you can catch them on sale for a very good price

3 .Freud 30T glue line rip (chrome not red) excellent, excellent blade!! Freshly sharpened I can cross cut plywood with no tear out. Again, subjective, but I think there is a difference b/t Freud chrome and red.

Summary, the blades I have:

Bang for the buck—>CMT.
Ultimate blade that will last 3-4X longer than a Freud—>Forrest
Very good blade that you’re ok with more frequent sharpenings—> Freud

DeWalt doesn’t make a horrible blade, sometimes its not the carbide or longevity, its the runout.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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