LumberJocks

Vintage Delta Lathe Restoration - Stuck drive center and Paint job

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by TheWoodenOyster posted 12-01-2021 03:49 AM 765 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1351 posts in 3268 days


12-01-2021 03:49 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe

Hey everyone,

Been itching for a lathe and snatched this one up for $50 over the weekend. It appears to be a Delta 930, the spindle center is 5 1/2” above the bed, and the bed is the steel z-channel, not the cast iron. It’s in working condition, but needs a good clean up. After about an hour or two of work I got the tailstock components working nice and smooth. But, I am having trouble with the headstock. The spindle is hollow, but there is some dirt packed in there (probably mud-dobber nests). There’s a spur drive center stuck in there and I have whacked the crap out of it with a dead blow and an oak dowel, but I can’t get the drive center out of the spindle. It seems to be rusted in there. Any tips? I have evaporust, WD-40, various cleaners, etc.

Also, I may paint this guy just to freshen up. The headstock and tailstock are sort of a dull galvanized looking finish. Will plain old enamel paint stick to this?

Also would love to hear any other tips about this lathe from anyone who knows anything about it.

Thanks,

Dave

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster


16 replies so far

View SMP's profile

SMP

5056 posts in 1238 days


#1 posted 12-01-2021 04:00 AM

I had the same issue with an old lathe I got for free. I tried PBBlaster etc and nothing seemed to work. Finally got the propane torch and a big screwdriver and hammer and kept heating it up and whacking the big screwdriver through the hollow and the taper finally popped free.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8850 posts in 3532 days


#2 posted 12-01-2021 07:27 AM

Bigger hammer and use a metal rod instead of wood. The back end of the taper on the drive spur should be hardened specifically for that reason. Clean out any packed in dirt first through! Note: Manual specifies using a 1/4” brass rod, or at least a 1/2” steel or iron rod. Heat certainly will help a great deal as noted.

Enamel is fine. Just make sure everything is good and clean first. Get rid of any rust or loose/flaking paint and take off the badges so they don’t get painted. I like to give it a quick wipe down with a dilute phosphoric acid solution to catch any missed rust, followed by a wipe down with Acetone just before painting.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Kudzupatch's profile

Kudzupatch

358 posts in 2541 days


#3 posted 12-01-2021 01:10 PM



Bigger hammer and use a metal rod instead of wood.

That is what I was thinking too. The wood is absorbing a lot of the force of your hammer.

If that doesn’t do it then I would heat it up with a torch.

-- Jeff Horton * Kudzu Craft skin boats* www.kudzucraft.com

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1351 posts in 3268 days


#4 posted 12-01-2021 02:59 PM

Thanks y’all. I’ll give a steel rod a shot. I’m guessing you are just saying to heat the body of the headstock and the spindle – so it expands and gives the drive center a little bit of room?

Also – does anyone know what the integral nut that is part of the pulleys does? I tried to back it off while holding the nut on the inboard end of the spindle and it just spun without grabbing the threads.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8850 posts in 3532 days


#5 posted 12-01-2021 06:14 PM

Yes, heat up the spindle. Don’t heat up the headstock body!

As for the integral ‘nut’ on the pulley – it should not be threaded. The pulley is held onto the spindle shaft via set screws. The ‘nut’ is so you can put a wrench on it to keep the spindle from spinning.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View hcbph_1's profile

hcbph_1

107 posts in 647 days


#6 posted 12-02-2021 06:59 PM

I once had a Delta Double Duty that looked very much like the OP’s lathe. The bearings and head weren’t that strong IMO. If I was going to knock out the spur center here’s the way I’d do it to reduce the chance of damage. Take off the head stock and support it on a wooden frame with the spur down. Pour some of your favorite penetrant (I prefer a 50-50 mix of acetone and ATF) into the center of the shaft and let it sit a day or two that way. Next get out your metal drift and hammer and give it a few whacks while the headstock is still supported around the bottom end of the spindle still supported. If the spur center doesn’t come out, repeat it again. If after about 3 attempts, then I’d get out the torch. IMO the headstock is not that strong and hitting through the spindle while the headstock is still mounted risks breaking it. Also the bearings aren’t that robust so that can be damaged also.
My 2 cents, hope it helps.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

20636 posts in 2471 days


#7 posted 12-02-2021 08:27 PM

Try tapping the drive center on the side before knocking it out. Sometimes that’s all you need to break the corrosive bond on a taper fit like that. Then definitely use a steel rod and hammer to knock it out. The acetone/atf suggestion above is a good one too. I also like Kroil. Torch will do the trick if nothing else does. But keep the heat away from cast iron and bearings. Only heat the steel spindle and spur.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1351 posts in 3268 days


#8 posted 12-03-2021 12:20 AM

So I’ve got an update and need some more advice. As usual with these old machines – a few wins and a few losses.

Good news: hammer and steel rod did the trick. The drive center is out no issues and the tailstock is degrimed and in the evaporust bath.

Bad news: I am stuck on the headstock. I am trying to get the spindle out to check the bearings and clean it up but I can’t figure out how to get it out. I tried tapping lightly with a deadblow on the pulleys parallel to the spindle since the pulleys aren’t threaded onto the spindle, but no movement and I actually caused a little hairline crack on one side of the biggest v groove. Idiot. It’s real small so I bet it’ll be fine but I’m still pissed. The nut on the inboard end of the spindle is pretty rusted and I think supposedly comes off, but I have no way to grip the spindle to keep it from rotating when I try to back the nut off. Anyone know how to free up this spindle? By the way I found this exploded view on vintage machinery that may help facilitate some discussion.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

20636 posts in 2471 days


#9 posted 12-03-2021 12:44 AM

It looks to me like the drive pulley is secured to the spindle with two set screws. Have you removed those?

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1351 posts in 3268 days


#10 posted 12-03-2021 12:46 AM

Yes I have removed the set screws. But valid question.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8850 posts in 3532 days


#11 posted 12-03-2021 02:01 AM

I’m pretty sure you need to remove the stepped pulley, spindle nut and the housing cover (6 screws) before you do anything. After that, you typically drive the spindle out toward the inboard side.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

20636 posts in 2471 days


#12 posted 12-03-2021 01:09 PM

Do you have a chuck for this lathe? Or a nut the size of the spindle threads? If so, you can put one of those one the inboard size and use it to prevent spindle rotation. An impact gun on the pulley nut might do the trick too.

Also a torch like mentioned earlier for the drive center might work. If it’s corrosion, heating the nut and letting it cool for a few cycles might stress and break the corrosive bond.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1351 posts in 3268 days


#13 posted 12-03-2021 08:57 PM

Ok I’ve got the penetrant soaking in to the immovable components so we’ll see what happens tonight.

On another front, been thinking about the paint job. I am thinking about just doing rattle can enamel. A few questions for anyone who has done that on an old machine:

1. What do you plug the openings you don’t want paint to get into with? (I could see there being a great simple solution here that has been passed down word of mouth)
2. Can I/ should I paint the pulley?
3. Can I speed up the drying by putting this in front of a heater? Not crazy heat, just like a space heater. I’ve had enamel finishes take forever to dry before. Like months.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8850 posts in 3532 days


#14 posted 12-03-2021 09:37 PM

1- Paper towel – wad up bits and stuff in hole. Easily removed with a pick after painting. Larger areas get painters tape and or parchment paper.

2- Your choice – just don’t paint the inside of the bore or where the belt rides.

3- I wouldn’t, and it should not take anywhere near that long to dry.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

20636 posts in 2471 days


#15 posted 12-03-2021 09:45 PM

1. Cardboard or whatever’s handy for large openings. I keep Silly Putty in the shop for plugging small holes and threaded holes.
2. Won’t hurt. Whatever floats your boat!
3. Depends on the enamel. I know folks that use high-temp enamel on old hand tools then back them at 140F to cure. But that’s a very controlled temperature evenly applied. I usually wait 72 hours before handling hand planes after spraying them with engine enamel. But again, it’s highly dependent on what enamel you’re using.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com