LumberJocks

ARGH - Hard maple, why do you scorch (tips on routering a juice groove?)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Winny94 posted 11-30-2021 03:16 AM 762 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Winny94's profile

Winny94

125 posts in 1772 days


11-30-2021 03:16 AM

Has anyone found a way to reduce scorching while routering on maple? Ive tried all the normal tips – slower RPMs, increase feed rate, sharp bit, shallow passes, etc., but im still getting some hard to remove scorch marks. Anyone find anything else that works? Maybe hogging out most material w/ a spiral bit?
Failing that, any preferred dremel bits to help remove burns?


4 replies so far

View WoodES's profile

WoodES

202 posts in 3021 days


#1 posted 11-30-2021 05:09 AM

Try a “cabinet” https://www.woodcraft.com/products/lynx-2pc-convex-cabinet-scraper-set scraper.

I use it for curved profiles when burn occurs.

View sunnybob's profile

sunnybob

95 posts in 96 days


#2 posted 11-30-2021 05:33 AM

The wood is burning, end of story. Make sure your cutter is sharp and clean, and leave the last pass to be wafer thin.
After that, sandpaper is your friend.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9130 posts in 3907 days


#3 posted 11-30-2021 01:05 PM

Plunge the corners first then have at it.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/68128

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9380 posts in 1905 days


#4 posted 11-30-2021 06:48 PM

I’ve found on Maple, Cherry a lot of your known Burners that speed control is often the issue, what speed ya running at?

Also tends to do the burn when the bit is dull, how many miles does the bit have on it?

What type of bit? 2 flute, three, solid carbide?

If you are good on all of this, then go one floor up, and check waho6o9’s suggestion to do the harder/slower to route corners first, and see if a plunge helps. I personally would still leave that very small amount to clean on a last pass, and do it in 2 to 4 passes, depending on wood density, and depth of desired cut, then do the clean up run. If ya nail it right, it eliminates a lot of sanding.

-- Think safe, be safe

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com