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Forum topic by Autorotate posted 11-28-2021 01:33 AM 547 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Autorotate

48 posts in 2262 days


11-28-2021 01:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: end grain cutting board router jointer square butcher block

Hello all,

I am probably overanalyzing this, but it is driving me crazy, and I want to redo them. I tried putting a 1/8” round over on my end grain boards at the 120 grit (saw it in the forums), where I usually do it at the end after my 220.

The problem was when I went to orbital sand the edges, it knocked my round over and squareness out probably 1/32-1/16”. I normally just put the sander perfectly flat up and down the sides for a couple passes to get rid of the scratches from hand sanding.

If you zoom in on the pictures you will see the round over is thinner in places.

So my questions are:

- Should I use a 3/16” bit and go a little rounder now, or will it give me uneven edges?

- Or Should I square the entire 4 sides of all the boards again and start over? I don’t really want to do this because the size and esthetics is where I want it.

And any recommendations/suggestions for how you finish your boards would also be appreciated. Thanks!


7 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1466 posts in 2444 days


#1 posted 11-28-2021 02:08 AM

Why did you have scratches left after hand sanding? Either you quit after a grit that was too coarse or you didn’t completely remove the scratches from the previous grit before going finer. Frankly, I don’t see the problem you describe. If your round-over is not even then true it up with 220 grit by hand and then use even finer grits to give it a polish. I would never use a power sander on an edge like that. The project looks real good. Be careful you don’t ruin it by trying to fix something that only you see.

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Autorotate

48 posts in 2262 days


#2 posted 11-28-2021 02:25 AM



Why did you have scratches left after hand sanding? Either you quit after a grit that was too coarse or you didn t completely remove the scratches from the previous grit before going finer. Frankly, I don t see the problem you describe. If your round-over is not even then true it up with 220 grit by hand and then use even finer grits to give it a polish. I would never use a power sander on an edge like that. The project looks real good. Be careful you don t ruin it by trying to fix something that only you see.

- bilyo

Bilyo,

Thank you very much for the reply.

The scratches are from me hitting the round over lightly by hand. I usually sand the round over by hand, and then hit the side real quick w/ the orbital where I left some scratches. I always go through all my grits 80-220, and do not skip. I go sand round over by hand, orbital side, then top and bottom w/ orbital.

And I think you hit the nail on the head, this is probably only something I see….haha. I just like a perfectly clean round over consistent all the way around top and bottom.

Thanks again!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9403 posts in 1916 days


#3 posted 11-28-2021 05:06 AM

When you route do one pass at most of your depth if just doing an 1/8” bit, then take a second shallow pass. After you do that the edges should be good. then ONLY sand the flat faces, stay off the sides if you did one side on a jointer, and the other on a TS, or both on a TS on a sled, that will make them good enough.

Cherry and maple might burn, if they do just a light sanding should remove that. I’d start on that at 220. Wood burn doesn’t require massive sanding, or course grits to remove.

Attempt after final cuts are done to only use the router bit on the edges, no sanding them, unless with light sand if there is burn.

-- Think safe, be safe

View jwflyfisher's profile

jwflyfisher

12 posts in 2944 days


#4 posted 12-01-2021 04:09 PM

I am going to attempt an end grain tumbling block cutting board My question is, does the initial parallelogram cut need to be the same thickness as the “sandwich” you start with. Mine is wider than 3/8”-3/4”-3-8”. Should it be cut at 3/4” or the total thickness?
I hope I made some sense. I confuse myself a lot.
Thanik you
jw

-- jsw

View Autorotate's profile

Autorotate

48 posts in 2262 days


#5 posted 12-01-2021 04:21 PM

I ended up fixing my routed edge. I edge trimmed perfectly square and flat and then went with a 3/16” bit. Soooo much better.

@jwflyfisher I’m not sure I understand your question. However, the final thickness you want will be determined after the second glue up and the cross cut from that. The cross cut is the final thickness, but don’t forget to account for flattening whether with a sled, CNC, etc.

There is a great cutting board designer tool where you can play around with all your measurements and see what the results are going to be. There is one for Mac and one for PC. Just google “cutting board designer.”

I will upload all my boards once they are done in their Walrus Oil baths. Here they are waiting to be oiled. They came out great in my bias opinion. Haha

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jwflyfisher

12 posts in 2944 days


#6 posted 12-01-2021 04:41 PM

I was referring to the initial “parallelogram” that is cut. I want to make sure it is curt to the correct thickness.

-- jsw

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jwflyfisher

12 posts in 2944 days


#7 posted 12-02-2021 08:40 PM

the sandwich I made, Maple,Walnut, Maple is 1 5/8” thick. How thick should I cut the Parallelogram

strips!

-- jsw

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