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How to fix this cutting board?

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Forum topic by Woodforbrains posted 11-27-2021 10:37 PM 561 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Woodforbrains

64 posts in 84 days


11-27-2021 10:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question maple clamp tablesaw refurbishing

Hi,

How can I fix this crack in the top of a birds-eye maple cutting board?

Because of the shape, it is hard to clamp, and it would take a lot of force to close the gap.

I was thinking about cutting straight down the center with a table saw, so that both sides are square and then gluing it. Do you think that could work? is there a better way? Do I have to worry about using a food safe glue?

Thanks for any advice!

-- Go team!


8 replies so far

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Aj2

4234 posts in 3140 days


#1 posted 11-27-2021 10:49 PM

Absolutely cut it at the crack that looks like a glue line. Just be sure the new glue surface is straight and Not convex shaped. )( < this shape is bad.
It’s a going to be a little bit of a challenge to clamp but I’m rooting for you.:)
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Woodforbrains

64 posts in 84 days


#2 posted 11-27-2021 11:18 PM

Got it, thanks!


Absolutely cut it at the crack that looks like a glue line. Just be sure the new glue surface is straight and Not convex shaped. )( < this shape is bad.
It’s a going to be a little bit of a challenge to clamp but I’m rooting for you.:)
Good Luck

- Aj2


-- Go team!

View Loren's profile

Loren

11375 posts in 4990 days


#3 posted 11-27-2021 11:27 PM

Many doweling jigs would be appropriate to align the sides. I have a broken cutting board on my to-do list and plan to use dowels so the joint doesn’t slip around.

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Woodforbrains

64 posts in 84 days


#4 posted 11-27-2021 11:45 PM

Oh, great idea. I will definitely do that!


Many doweling jigs would be appropriate to align the sides. I have a broken cutting board on my to-do list and plan to use dowels so the joint doesn t slip around.

- Loren


-- Go team!

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1466 posts in 2444 days


#5 posted 11-28-2021 01:46 AM

Definitely. Cutting it apart and re-gluing is the best way to go. If you have a 7 1/2” circular saw blade, put that on your table saw. It will cut a much thinner kerf, if that is important to you. To clamp it closed, put two 1×1s or 1×2s opposite each other on each side of the board and on each side of the cut line (four total). Hold them in place with clamps. Then put additional clamps across each pair of 1x whichevers (4 to 6 clamps needed). This should allow enough pressure perpendicular to the cut to hold it until it dries. Be sure. as you tighten the clamps, that you keep the total board flat.

Or. Another way to clamp it is to use a piece of 3/4” plywood (make sure it is flat) that is a few inches larger than the cutting board. Lay the cutting board (before you cut it) on the plywood and securely fasten some battens to the pllywood and along each side of the cutting board and parallel to the cut line and about 1/4” away from it’s edges. Now cut and re-glue the cutting board and lay it back down on the plywood. Now use some small wedges between the battens and the cutting board edges. Tap them in tight to hold the cutting board until the glue is dry.

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Woodforbrains

64 posts in 84 days


#6 posted 11-28-2021 02:09 AM

bilyo, thanks for the explanation. I have never used wedges before like that.

What dimensions roughly, should the wedges be? and which direction do you drive the wedges in?


Definitely. Cutting it apart and re-gluing is the best way to go. If you have a 7 1/2” circular saw blade, put that on your table saw. It will cut a much thinner kerf, if that is important to you. To clamp it closed, put two 1×1s or 1×2s opposite each other on each side of the board and on each side of the cut line (four total). Hold them in place with clamps. Then put additional clamps across each pair of 1x whichevers (4 to 6 clamps needed). This should allow enough pressure perpendicular to the cut to hold it until it dries. Be sure. as you tighten the clamps, that you keep the total board flat.

Or. Another way to clamp it is to use a piece of 3/4” plywood (make sure it is flat) that is a few inches larger than the cutting board. Lay the cutting board (before you cut it) on the plywood and securely fasten some battens to the pllywood and along each side of the cutting board and parallel to the cut line and about 1/4” away from it s edges. Now cut and re-glue the cutting board and lay it back down on the plywood. Now use some small wedges between the battens and the cutting board edges. Tap them in tight to hold the cutting board until the glue is dry.

- bilyo


-- Go team!

View Jackryan's profile

Jackryan

25 posts in 3218 days


#7 posted 11-28-2021 02:14 AM

Some metal strapping and lag bolts. Gives it an industrial look.

-- Dave, Wi.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1466 posts in 2444 days


#8 posted 11-28-2021 02:22 AM

The wedges should be sized so that they will lay on edge between the cutting board and the battens so that they can be wedged between the two. you can also use the wedges in pairs so that as you tap them past one another in opposite directions they will work together to put pressure on the glue joint.

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