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is epoxy best choice to fill this void?

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Forum topic by Winny94 posted 11-26-2021 11:29 PM 613 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Winny94

125 posts in 1774 days


11-26-2021 11:29 PM

I really want to use this piece of walnut in my table top. I’ve never tried filling a void like this – is epoxy my best choice? (I dislike all the trendy epoxy tables, so unsure how I feel about this route).
The void is about 15” long, about 1-1/4” at the widest and about an inch deep

Any suggestions, tips or ideas? Whatever process is recommended, it’ll be my first attempt at it, so no matter how trivial the tip may be, I’d appreciate it.


18 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

11369 posts in 4981 days


#1 posted 11-27-2021 01:15 AM

I’d be concerned about the distorted tissue around the void messing up your table if you glue boards to both sides. If you plan to put it on the edge no worries though.

I’ve never used epoxy to fill voids but from what I know of it it’s probably your best option. I don’t think you can run it through a planer.

View Rich's profile

Rich

7744 posts in 1922 days


#2 posted 11-27-2021 01:25 AM

I use epoxy to fill voids that large. I do believe it’s your best choice. You don’t need to turn it into a trendy pour with sparkly colors. I use black pigment exclusively. Using Mixol, you can go for a browner look if that’s what you like.

And yes, you can run epoxy-filled boards through your planer. Just make sure it’s cured.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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MrUnix

8850 posts in 3532 days


#3 posted 11-27-2021 05:07 AM

If it were mine, I’d use epoxy + coffee grounds for a nice matching dark brown fill. Tape well to avoid leaks, and fill slightly proud of the wood so you can sand/plane it down flush after curing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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OSU55

2937 posts in 3322 days


#4 posted 11-27-2021 01:32 PM

As Unix said, Epoxy to fill and tape well. Coffee grounds do look very good in walnut. I also like mica powder. Coffee grounds may not fill the smaller cracks/defects, mica powder will. Depends on the final look you are after. Properly filled and dimensioned I would use the board anywhere in the top.

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LittleShaver

779 posts in 1952 days


#5 posted 11-27-2021 02:02 PM

I use semi-precious stones as a kind of aggregate when I fill large voids and I use clear epoxy. We have quite a collection of stones from my late father-in-law so they means something special to my wife and me. Just be sure the stones are below your finished surface height.

-- Sawdust Maker

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

6330 posts in 2555 days


#6 posted 11-27-2021 03:32 PM

I’m a fan of void filling with epoxy, gives you a huge range of possibilities for accent. The only downside I see is the volume required ($$$). Resin is probably cheaper but I expect it would not have the strength I’d hope for, especially for a table top.

You could do as Brad suggests for visual effect or bury some other objects down deeper to lessen the amount of fill required.

Other than than, looks like some great wood for a top, nice grain!

View Winny94's profile

Winny94

125 posts in 1774 days


#7 posted 11-27-2021 04:45 PM



I m a fan of void filling with epoxy, gives you a huge range of possibilities for accent. The only downside I see is the volume required ($$$). Resin is probably cheaper but I expect it would not have the strength I d hope for, especially for a table top.

You could do as Brad suggests for visual effect or bury some other objects down deeper to lessen the amount of fill required.

Other than than, looks like some great wood for a top, nice grain!

- splintergroup


Based on calculators, that void will only need about 0.15 gallons, so that shouldn’t be much of concern.

Now, finding an epoxy that is newbie friendly, doesn’t need very specific, high room temps (like Pro Marine), and no VOCs – that is a challenge haha

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Winny94

125 posts in 1774 days


#8 posted 11-27-2021 04:48 PM



As Unix said, Epoxy to fill and tape well. Coffee grounds do look very good in walnut. I also like mica powder. Coffee grounds may not fill the smaller cracks/defects, mica powder will. Depends on the final look you are after. Properly filled and dimensioned I would use the board anywhere in the top.

- OSU55


If I were to use that piece in the middle, I’d need need to use epoxy on the cured epoxy to join to the adjacent board, yea? Wood glue on wood to wood contact, epoxy on expoxy to wood contact?

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1457 posts in 2435 days


#9 posted 11-27-2021 05:06 PM

Depending on the size and shape of your table, leaving the void open could be a great visual feature; especially if you have a similar piece that you could put next to it that would mirror each other or make it appear as a continuation. You may want to stabilize it from the bottom with some bowtie or similar inlays if you do this.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4221 posts in 3131 days


#10 posted 11-27-2021 05:48 PM

I would cut that piece off.
For the long run table are better off without epoxies. Plus that’s a huge defect. I see enough figured wood to the left of the crack to make nice book matched panels.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2937 posts in 3322 days


#11 posted 11-27-2021 08:03 PM

If I were to use that piece in the middle, I d need need to use epoxy on the cured epoxy to join to the adjacent board, yea? Wood glue on wood to wood contact, epoxy on expoxy to wood contact?

- Winny94


The edge will have a pretty short section of plastic exposed with plenty of support both sides, so I’m thinking just wood glue would hold up just fine unless you’re going to be dancing on the table.

View LesB's profile

LesB

3237 posts in 4776 days


#12 posted 11-28-2021 06:37 PM

I’m with AJ2. I would not use that big of a void in a table glue up. Why ask for problems?

If you decide to use it and fill with epoxy you can glue it with Urethane glue(think original Gorilla glue). Put a thin coat on and clamp well but not hard. It expands as it cures. Any squeeze out should be left to cure before removal; it forms a easily scrap able foam. Put glue on one side of the joint and wipe the other side with a wet cloth or paper towel, it cures with moisture. If I used it for that joint I would continue to use it on the whole top.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Winny94's profile

Winny94

125 posts in 1774 days


#13 posted 11-28-2021 07:11 PM



I m with AJ2. I would not use that big of a void in a table glue up. Why ask for problems?

If you decide to use it and fill with epoxy you can glue it with Urethane glue(think original Gorilla glue). Put a thin coat on and clamp well but not hard. It expands as it cures. Any squeeze out should be left to cure before removal; it forms a easily scrap able foam. Put glue on one side of the joint and wipe the other side with a wet cloth or paper towel, it cures with moisture. If I used it for that joint I would continue to use it on the whole top.

- LesB


I’m not sure what sort of problem that void could cause (assuming the epoxy is applied correctly)? Epoxy is more durable than the wood itself.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4221 posts in 3131 days


#14 posted 11-28-2021 08:28 PM

As the walnut ages and gets worn it gains beauty. As the plastic epoxy part ages and gains scratches it will gain ugly
Just my single opinion feel free to carry on as you will :)
Good day sir.

-- Aj

View pottz's profile

pottz

22280 posts in 2317 days


#15 posted 11-29-2021 02:43 AM



I m with AJ2. I would not use that big of a void in a table glue up. Why ask for problems?

If you decide to use it and fill with epoxy you can glue it with Urethane glue(think original Gorilla glue). Put a thin coat on and clamp well but not hard. It expands as it cures. Any squeeze out should be left to cure before removal; it forms a easily scrap able foam. Put glue on one side of the joint and wipe the other side with a wet cloth or paper towel, it cures with moisture. If I used it for that joint I would continue to use it on the whole top.

- LesB


yeah i go with aj2 and les,why go through the trouble and expense for something that may cause an issue later.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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