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6-15 plug to a L630 recepticle?

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Forum topic by Winny94 posted 11-25-2021 06:08 AM 296 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Winny94

106 posts in 1722 days


11-25-2021 06:08 AM

Curious if anyone suggests the “best way” to run a 6-15 plug (Delta planer) into a L630 receptacle (installed for PM TS).

Assuming an adapter like this is easiest: https://www.homedepot.com/p/AC-WORKS-Locking-Adapter-NEMA-L6-30P-30-Amp-250-Volt-Locking-Plug-to-NEMA-6-15-20R-15-20-Amp-250-Volt-Female-Connector-ADL630620/303873821

But would it be safe to replace the 6-15 plug with a L630 plug?


10 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

5013 posts in 2775 days


#1 posted 11-25-2021 06:55 AM

Adapters add another source of failure, and maintenance.
Changing the plug to a locking version with higher current rating is perfectly safe, and the recommended solution.

Note that a typical L6-30 plug is rated for 2HP.
Can not use this plug as it means to disconnect power while motor is operating; IF the motor is larger than 2HP, without potential for damage. This is another reason to switch to a locking style plug, so you can ensure the motor is off when making connection.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7284 posts in 3774 days


#2 posted 11-25-2021 11:45 AM

I’ve not seen an adapter like that before, learn something every day. But I think the easiest would be to just replace the plug on your planer. I was reading the above response, I think your planer might be 3 HP (mine is) and if the above is true that adapter wouldn’t work.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Winny94's profile

Winny94

106 posts in 1722 days


#3 posted 11-25-2021 04:13 PM



I ve not seen an adapter like that before, learn something every day. But I think the easiest would be to just replace the plug on your planer. I was reading the above response, I think your planer might be 3 HP (mine is) and if the above is true that adapter wouldn t work.

- Fred Hargis


My planer is a 2 HP. Odds are I’ll just replace the plug. Just trying to read if there’s any issues running the 10Ga (from the box to the recepticle) into an 8Ga and/or any issues putting the L630 plug on 8Ga.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8185 posts in 2668 days


#4 posted 11-25-2021 05:57 PM

I am confused. Is the cord on the planer 8ga? If so, make sure that the plug can accept such a thick wire. Or is this a new run from the breaker to the receptacle? Just make sure that the breaker, wire and and receptacle are all rated for the 30 amps.

I am pretty sure that 8 and 10 gauge are fine on a 30 amp 240v circuit unless maybe if it is an exceptionally long run or something. 8 gauge may be overkill

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Winny94's profile

Winny94

106 posts in 1722 days


#5 posted 11-25-2021 07:29 PM



I am confused. Is the cord on the planer 8ga? If so, make sure that the plug can accept such a thick wire. Or is this a new run from the breaker to the receptacle? Just make sure that the breaker, wire and and receptacle are all rated for the 30 amps.

I am pretty sure that 8 and 10 gauge are fine on a 30 amp 240v circuit unless maybe if it is an exceptionally long run or something. 8 gauge may be overkill

- Lazyman


Ugh, I misspoke. I meant 12Ga, not 8. (And I need to confirm that before doing anything). I know from break to recepticle is 10Ga 30Amp

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7284 posts in 3774 days


#6 posted 11-25-2021 09:36 PM

Don’t be surprised if it’s 14 gauge. Whatever it is, it’ll do for the planer.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1417 posts in 2842 days


#7 posted 11-27-2021 11:50 PM

Be aware adapters like the one you linked are not UL certified. Be sure to follow manufacturer instructions for power connections. If the motor doesn’t have its own overload protection I highly advise against plugging it into a 30A power source.

View Winny94's profile

Winny94

106 posts in 1722 days


#8 posted 11-28-2021 12:19 AM



Be aware adapters like the one you linked are not UL certified. Be sure to follow manufacturer instructions for power connections. If the motor doesn t have its own overload protection I highly advise against plugging it into a 30A power source.

- WhyMe


I don’t understand this logic – the tool will pull what it needs. Like plugging a lamp into a 20Amp line.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8185 posts in 2668 days


#9 posted 11-28-2021 12:40 AM

When motors have a problem they can pull more amps than they are supposed to. If the planer doesn’t have a built in 20 amp overload protection it could pull over 30 amps before the breaker trips and burn out the motor, melt the wiring or catch fire.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

22789 posts in 4957 days


#10 posted 11-28-2021 02:09 AM


Be aware adapters like the one you linked are not UL certified. Be sure to follow manufacturer instructions for power connections. If the motor doesn t have its own overload protection I highly advise against plugging it into a 30A power source.

- WhyMe

I don t understand this logic – the tool will pull what it needs. Like plugging a lamp into a 20Amp line.

- Winny94


Circuit breakers are overcurrent / short circuit protection. Most hold higher than their rated amps for a significant period of time. Overload protection is specific to the motor it protects and responds much quicker. If you have a piece of wood stuck and stopping the motor in the planer from turning the overloads should trip within a few seconds. Most circuit breakers that will hold the motor starting spike will hold the “overload” long enough to do some damage. Square D and Eaton (Cutler-Hammer) circuit breakers have both thermal and magnetic trips and will trip on a motor overload very quickly but not as fast as the overload protection will. Other brands of circuit breakers have only thermal trips. They will hold an overload for a significant period of time. A short circuit protected by most brands will damage the wire and leave burn marks on the metal item the wire contacted. Square D and Eaton (Cutler-Hammer) circuit breakers’ magnetic trips usually act fast enough there is no visible damage when wire contacts metal making a short circuit. If there is visible damage it is significantly less than the other brands. With that being said, I hope it is clearer than mud ;-) I agree, I would not recommend using a circuit protected at 30 amps on a tool with a 6-15 plug.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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