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Biscuit joiner Q

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Forum topic by nickbatz posted 11-24-2021 07:47 PM 643 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nickbatz

870 posts in 1365 days


11-24-2021 07:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: biscuit joiner

Could one use a biscuit joiner when attaching something like the top of a big box, or do they only work for edge joining?

I’ve been using dowels for that, and they work well. But they’re sort of a PITA and it occurred to me that a biscuit joiner might be less of one.

If so, what models are good, fast, and cheap?

TIA


43 replies so far

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Peteybadboy

4153 posts in 3234 days


#1 posted 11-24-2021 10:05 PM

Hard to answer w/o a photo, but I would say yes.

Good,Fast is something I care about. Hope you can find what you want.

-- Petey

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Madmark2

3155 posts in 1873 days


#2 posted 11-24-2021 10:14 PM

I use a biscuiter for all sorts of things. From cabinet doors to kitchen cabs to table tops to attaching aprons to legs (doubled), etc.

Use a brush to make sure the glue is spread in the slot and on 1/2 the biscuit. The butter the other side and clamp at biscuit locations (and elsewhere, if needed.)

It’s easy to corner join a cabinet. just set the biscuiter on the edge instead of the face. Be sure to reference the fence and not the base.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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nickbatz

870 posts in 1365 days


#3 posted 11-24-2021 10:14 PM

Thanks Pete.

Look at the very top shelf on the frame – the one I described as closing a box.

I’ve been using dowels (okay, I admit it – or pocket hole screws) to add more than just glue when attaching the top.

Will the biscuit joiner cut slots that let you join the top at a right angle, or will it only cut them on the edges of boards?

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nickbatz

870 posts in 1365 days


#4 posted 11-24-2021 10:17 PM


I use a biscuiter for all sorts of things. From cabinet doors to kitchen cabs to table tops to attaching aprons to legs (doubled), etc.

Use a brush to make sure the glue is spread in the slot and on 1/2 the biscuit. The butter the other side and clamp at biscuit locations (and elsewhere, if needed.)

- Madmark2

Thanks Mark.

Please see my previous post. I know it’ll work for edge-joining (although I’ve had no problem just using glue). My question is whether you can cut slots on the faces of boards – in this case close to the edge.

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StevoWevo

54 posts in 133 days


#5 posted 11-24-2021 10:53 PM

I’ve made some similar joints like that with biscuits in plywood pieces with no problems that I know of. Also plenty of solid wood corner joints. Not sure if movement in solid hardwoods on your particular application will be an issue. Hopefully someone with more experience can comment on that

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BlasterStumps

2152 posts in 1724 days


#6 posted 11-24-2021 11:08 PM

Mine is a Dewalt 682 model if memory serves me. Not the best of the best I know but, it seems to work well enough. I went for corded because of such infrequent use.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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Loren

11308 posts in 4932 days


#7 posted 11-24-2021 11:22 PM

A biscuit jointer will work.

The example shown above might be ignoring wood movement, but in a box of modest size, perhaps 12” wide made of solid wood you could probably get away with gluing cross grain to long grain without movement splitting the top sooner or later.

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CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1463 days


#8 posted 11-24-2021 11:36 PM

I think I’d use figure 8s for that top part and pocket hole the backside if not seen. Glue if seen.

You have cross grain joinery which could cause problems with biscuits or dowels. Biscuits are more forgiving one way, but in your case, you will still need to be perfect the other way(hardest part to get right).

Biscuits maybe slightly easier just because there is a tool that does it.

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nickbatz

870 posts in 1365 days


#9 posted 11-25-2021 01:00 AM

Hm. Thanks for the responses.

I actually have no idea what youse guys are talking about re: wood shifting. The top shelf just sits on top of the frame, and it doesn’t have to be attached very solidly since has stuff sitting on it (specifically a pair of speakers and a computer monitor).

I’ve now made eleven of these desks over the past 3-1/2 years roughly, and never had any issues with that happening.

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CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1463 days


#10 posted 11-25-2021 01:04 AM

Is the middle panel solid wood? If so, I think your asking for trouble. The top you can probably get away with cross grain because it’s so small.

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nickbatz

870 posts in 1365 days


#11 posted 11-25-2021 01:35 AM

It’s all 4/4 solid wood. What trouble am I asking for?

View mtnwild's profile

mtnwild

4585 posts in 4812 days


#12 posted 11-25-2021 01:52 AM

I hope I don’t cofuse this all up, I don’t work the laptop very well, so I’ll try and explain…A way to attach the top’’’

You’er talking that small top piece I assume…

On the top of each side, make a dovetail piece and attach to the top…Don’t go all the way to the front, leave a little space…Drill and screw the dovetails down…That top is so short you can probably leave it whole length…If longer you would want to split the dovetail up some…Put it in full length then cut the sections out after you scew it down…then you know they are straight…

Then cut your slots in the bottom of the top shelf and it’s done…Slip it right on…You can figure a way to make it secure if it’s needed…

Hope that’s plain enough…Saw it in a woodcraft book once, used it on my bow and arrow rack, but in a different context there…

Just a thought, if not now, maybe will work somewhere else for you sometime…Cool man…

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

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CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1463 days


#13 posted 11-25-2021 02:00 AM

I guess it depends on how you put it together. The middle panel has the potential to move over 1/8” front to back. The side panels you have them attached to are not going move at all front to back.

So If they are glued in with biscuits, dowels, etc, there is a decent chance the panel will crack.

You might get lucky. But history of wood joinery says otherwise.

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nickbatz

870 posts in 1365 days


#14 posted 11-25-2021 02:49 AM

I don’t think so, CW. Nothing is going anywhere. Boxes are basic to lots of furniture, and if they shifted and broke then every piece of furniture would break.

I’ve been working on a desk with the same design all day long for 15 years, and as I said, I’m finishing up my 11th right now.

mtnwild, the top shelf – the highest piece in the picture – just needs to sit on top of the frame. I’ve just used pocket hole screws (and glue) for the last few. The desk in the picture is the first one I dovetailed – the sides, not the top – and I’m doing another one right now with the dovetails in the back just for the hell of it.

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CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1463 days


#15 posted 11-25-2021 02:59 AM

Nick, solid wood glued in joinery cross grain at 2’ish feet is a big no-no. You may get lucky, you might not.

I’ve been involved with solid wood furniture for close to 4 decades. Seen a lot of stuff built that way and last for a long time. Also seen it split. There are a lot of factors that determine what happens. But if you want the best chance at success don’t ignore wood movement. Sooner or later, it will bite you. Best of luck.

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