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Bailey No 2 Plane- or is it?

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Forum topic by Shed posted 11-13-2021 12:51 AM 674 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shed

4 posts in 71 days


11-13-2021 12:51 AM

Hi all,

I’m a woodworker from the UK, and I have an enjoyable sideline in cleaning up and passing on hand planes. I have one however, that I was given many years ago and was hoping someone could help with the ID.

For all intents and purposes this appears to be a Stanley No 2, but with some unusual aspects. It does not say Stanley anywhere, but contains two references to Leonard Bailey and two of his patents, one on the solid brass adjustment knob and one on cap iron. The tote also has been stamped with some user initials (AEP) and an unknown address- “Stuttaford, W.DE C.P.”

Also a random uniqueness is that the blade adjustment screw is a RH thread, which means the blade moves the wrong way for a standard Bailey plane.

Any ideas for more info on this plane? Maybe an original Bailey or just a copy?

Stanley No 2’s seem to be a big thing with collectors, which I’ve never really understood. Must just be the cute factor, as they are crap for working with.

Many thanks!


11 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17678 posts in 3956 days


#1 posted 11-13-2021 12:59 AM

At least an early ‘type’, as in, pre-lateral adjuster, if it’s stanley.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1972 posts in 992 days


#2 posted 11-13-2021 01:47 AM

It looks like Type 2 Stanley #2 which would make it the first of that size. The only thing that looks a little off is the size of the front knob. It looks like it belongs to a #3 size but I’ve never actually seen a type 2 #2 in person so its possible the first #2s had a large front knob.

Stanley didn’t start putting sizes on the planes until type 5 and prior to type 9 they all had right hand thread depth adjusters. And it was either type 9 or type 10 before they started casting Bailey into the bodies.

The reason that #2s are valuable to collectors has nothing to do with their usability and has everything to do with their rarity. You may have one of the rarest #2s around in your possession. Hopefully DonW or KYToolsmith will chime in and let us know for sure.

View Shed's profile

Shed

4 posts in 71 days


#3 posted 11-13-2021 02:06 AM


It looks like Type 2 Stanley #2 which would make it the first of that size. The only thing that looks a little off is the size of the front knob. It looks like it belongs to a #3 size but I ve never actually seen a type 2 #2 in person so its possible the first #2s had a large front knob.

Stanley didn t start putting sizes on the planes until type 5 and prior to type 9 they all had right hand thread depth adjusters. And it was either type 9 or type 10 before they started casting Bailey into the bodies.

The reason that #2s are valuable to collectors has nothing to do with their usability and has everything to do with their rarity. You may have one of the rarest #2s around in your possession. Hopefully DonW or KYToolsmith will chime in and let us know for sure.

- sansoo22

Thanks for that info, I have very little experience with the early type Baileys.

And forgive my facetiousness, I do understand that small quantities increase demand. If it is indeed that rare though, I don’t think my nephew will get to continue playing with it on his workshop visits… ;)

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

4085 posts in 2313 days


#4 posted 11-13-2021 02:23 AM

That’s a rare one let the nephew play with a bedrock 605 instead of that#2.

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SMP

5072 posts in 1243 days


#5 posted 11-13-2021 03:09 AM

I have a transitional Stanley that has that damned reverse threads. Can’t tell you how many pieces of wood I tore up before i learned my lesson.

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

245 posts in 1197 days


#6 posted 11-13-2021 12:22 PM

Definitely an early one. Keep in mind, the original type study was using No. 4 planes… and the study acknowledged that not all sizes conformed to the types described. Specifically the type study states that the No. 2 size planes have variations in the parts used. I’d call this one a type 4… The type 5 or later would have a lateral lever, and the type 3 has a completely different frog support that is vertical. The screw heads holding the frog appear to be flat heads instead of the round heads found on a type 1 or type 2. That would be confirmed by seeing the frog seat in the body. A type 1 or type 2 has an “H” shaped frog seat instead of three parallel flats. I agree the front knob seems to have been changed, but even that is a pre type 5 knob. The adjusting wheel has the markings of a type 2 – type 4, and yes, the threads are RH on the early Bailey’s. Good to see one that old.
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View Shed's profile

Shed

4 posts in 71 days


#7 posted 11-13-2021 08:36 PM

Thanks so much guys, this has been a real education.

Being a user and not a collector myself, I think I will try to pass it on to someone who will love it more. As I have said, for all it’s rarity, a block plane does the job much better :)

So though I know it’s a unpleasant question, would anyone be willing to estimate a reasonable price? On Ebay these seem to go for £100-£500, should I be aiming there?

Again, thanks for all your help!

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corelz125

4085 posts in 2313 days


#8 posted 11-13-2021 10:42 PM

This type and it’s in good shape. You don’t have money invested in it it’s all profit. Remember eBay takes their cut before you get paid. 350 is a good starting point. The market will decide from there if it’s worth more.

View Don W's profile

Don W

20285 posts in 3905 days


#9 posted 11-15-2021 06:58 PM

It’s definitely a call piece but the screw heads look round to me. Can we see a picture with the frog off of the frog seat?

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Shed's profile

Shed

4 posts in 71 days


#10 posted 11-19-2021 10:38 PM

Sorry just saw this. Love your website incidentally, it’s been a huge help in the past!

With the frog removed, and the back of the lever cap also.

And from above-

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

245 posts in 1197 days


#11 posted 11-20-2021 12:11 AM

Wow! The body and frog are Type 2… “H” shaped frog seat. Also diagonal knurling on the adjuster! The lever cap seems later… Type 2 would be solid back….no indentation below the key hole…hmmm. What logo or markings are on the iron and chip breaker? Is the chip breaker screw head knurled or smooth? On the Type 2 planes that I have, the size is marked on the body casting under the tote… What are the adjusting wheel markings? There are four known variations of the markings on early adjusting wheels. As the original Type study, states, No. 2 size planes do not confirm exactly to the type definitions. Neverless, Super find!
Regards The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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