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Slot cutting bit for rails?

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Forum topic by MarkCh posted 11-09-2021 02:27 PM 401 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MarkCh

100 posts in 560 days


11-09-2021 02:27 PM

I’m about to make my first frame&panel door. It is white oak. I was thinking of cutting the dado for the panel using a 1/4” slot cutting bit on the router table so that I could do a stopped cut that is not visible on the ends of the rails. Bad idea (too heavy of a cut)? Just take multiple passes at increasing depths?


15 replies so far

View StevoWevo's profile

StevoWevo

64 posts in 181 days


#1 posted 11-09-2021 03:23 PM

Normally the slots run the whole way through. This way gives a little face grain glue surface all the way to the end of the joint. What you want to do will be more work and sacrifice some of the that glue surface for an end to edge grain glue up. None the less, its totally doable with a slot cutter or by drop and stop cutting with a spiral bit. FWW,I have the imperial slot cutting set from CMT I picked up from Amazon and I have pretty happy with it – https://www.cmtorangetools.com/na-en/router-bit-sets/slot-cutter-sets If you have a domino, you can place one at the end of the cut which makes a pretty good stile/rail connection without any need to clean up the end of the slot cut

View SMP's profile

SMP

5056 posts in 1238 days


#2 posted 11-09-2021 03:54 PM

I would just buy a door set of router bits in the profile you want, those will already cut the slot.

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MarkCh

100 posts in 560 days


#3 posted 11-09-2021 03:58 PM

I’ve never came across a door set I’ve liked. Prefer flat/shaker style (stile). For the joints I’ve got a loose tenon jig that works pretty well. The rails/ stiles are 3” wide, so I may use some of the slot for a loose tenon as well.

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SMP

5056 posts in 1238 days


#4 posted 11-09-2021 04:29 PM



I ve never came across a door set I ve liked. Prefer flat/shaker style (stile). For the joints I ve got a loose tenon jig that works pretty well. The rails/ stiles are 3” wide, so I may use some of the slot for a loose tenon as well.

- MarkCh

You can buy shaker sets, huge time saver. actually the one I use the most is called “modern shaker” has just a very slight bevel to it.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9383 posts in 1907 days


#5 posted 11-09-2021 05:19 PM

Slot cutters are becoming an often used bit to do a lot of groove, dado, and rabbet work. As with any router bit careful set up, and a test cut or 2 to make sure you are course are really a good thing, before running that pile of $$$$$ per bd/ft special ordered wood through. :-)

Shaker doors are a profile that can easily be done on a TS start to finish, all straight lines, and hard flat cuts/bevels. Stop cuts on a TS are IMHO crazy use, if you also have a router table to use. The very basic Shaker door is just a flat panel inserted into a rail and stile, which kinda sounds like what the OP is talking about.

Below is a Shaker style with a raised panel. The reason I am using this pic it clearly illustrates that if you do tenon to groove joinery, you need NOT do a stopped cut.

The exact same joinery can be used for a Shaker flat panel door as what is shown above.

-- Think safe, be safe

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pottz

22280 posts in 2317 days


#6 posted 11-09-2021 05:27 PM

what smp said,many companies make them. or do like trsn is showing,more work but it will do what you need.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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MarkCh

100 posts in 560 days


#7 posted 11-09-2021 05:37 PM

Just bought a whiteside 15 degree chamfer bit since I didn’t want to invest in the full shaker set for the two doors I’m making.

Sounds like 3/8” is not too deep of a pass on a 1/4” slot cutting bit, but worth a test cut on scrap. Making it a stop cut will be a bit tricky since I’d prefer to have a featherboard push the work piece against the fence the entire time, but some easy custom push sticks can keep my fingers away and a nice snug cut.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9383 posts in 1907 days


#8 posted 11-09-2021 06:04 PM

Stop cuts are always best IF you are doing shorter pieces, then you simply set a stop block on the fence. For longer stuff it requires being creative, and having a stop attached to a fixture NOT on the router table. Say another tool or bench parked near enough to work.

-- Think safe, be safe

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

9383 posts in 1907 days


#9 posted 11-09-2021 06:09 PM



what smp said,many companies make them. or do like trsn is showing,more work but it will do what you need.

- pottz

Larry I have one of those Infinity 8” Dado rim blades with the flat tooth grind. Makes a PERFECT 1/4” groove. I can set up, and cut out several doors worth of stock, while you are setting up the router bit. I agree if you are making a 1/4” groove, and are flipping stock to 2 cut it with an 1/8” blade, that is a waste of my time. Not nearly as accurate either. I’m making a lot of shop cabinets right now, and it is my favorite blade.

-- Think safe, be safe

View MarkCh's profile

MarkCh

100 posts in 560 days


#10 posted 11-09-2021 06:42 PM

Unfortunately I use the worksite dewalt TS that does not take a dado.

There is wiggle room for the stop cut, as long as I don’t pass through the far side, so cutting to a pencil line is ok.

View AlanWS's profile

AlanWS

184 posts in 4891 days


#11 posted 11-09-2021 08:49 PM

A slot cutter will work fine, but I do not understand why a stopped groove in this circumstance would be desirable. The stub tenon or haunch of the rail will fill the end of the groove, adding stability desirable in a door. And you usually don’t see the top and bottom edges of doors very much anyway.

-- Alan in Wisconsin

View pottz's profile

pottz

22280 posts in 2317 days


#12 posted 11-09-2021 08:52 PM


what smp said,many companies make them. or do like trsn is showing,more work but it will do what you need.

- pottz

Larry I have one of those Infinity 8” Dado rim blades with the flat tooth grind. Makes a PERFECT 1/4” groove. I can set up, and cut out several doors worth of stock, while you are setting up the router bit. I agree if you are making a 1/4” groove, and are flipping stock to 2 cut it with an 1/8” blade, that is a waste of my time. Not nearly as accurate either. I m making a lot of shop cabinets right now, and it is my favorite blade.

- therealSteveN


yeah if your only making a couple doors thats the way to go.i recently remade all my kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors and the door set was the only way to go.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View MarkCh's profile

MarkCh

100 posts in 560 days


#13 posted 11-09-2021 08:59 PM

@AlinWS – solely neuroticism induced by seeing broken lines. I’m definitely the only person who will look at the door and see it.


A slot cutter will work fine, but I do not understand why a stopped groove in this circumstance would be desirable. The stub tenon or haunch of the rail will fill the end of the groove, adding stability desirable in a door. And you usually don t see the top and bottom edges of doors very much anyway.

- AlanWS


View bandit571's profile

bandit571

30423 posts in 4016 days


#14 posted 11-09-2021 09:10 PM

A bit Olde School for some…

But a bit easier for me..

Just a door…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View MarkCh's profile

MarkCh

100 posts in 560 days


#15 posted 11-09-2021 09:35 PM

Looks great!

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