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Sanding danish oil befor Poly

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Forum topic by MB100 posted 10-28-2021 01:20 PM 385 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MB100

5 posts in 35 days


10-28-2021 01:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut finish oil poly over danish oil

Three coats of Watco Danish oil. Been curing for a week and now dry

Finishing with Oil poly.

Question is do I need to sand before First coat of poly.?

Seems to be a variety of opinions.


10 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

19821 posts in 2421 days


#1 posted 10-28-2021 02:16 PM

Only if it feels rough. If necessary, you can wet sand to de-nib it. Otherwise I would just proceed with poly if everything looks and feels good.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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Rich

7559 posts in 1871 days


#2 posted 10-28-2021 06:06 PM

Agree with Kenny. And if you do need to smooth it off, use something fine like 320 grit or even a grey 3M pad to go over it lightly. You don’t want to risk sanding through to bare wood.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4801 posts in 3630 days


#3 posted 10-28-2021 06:33 PM

I always lightly sand with 400 grit or higher on the watco before applying poly, then between poly coats as well. It makes for a really nice feel when the project is finished.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1421 posts in 2385 days


#4 posted 10-28-2021 11:49 PM

My opinion is slightly different. If you sand the danish oil at all, do it with a very fine grit (higher than 220) and use a very light touch and very few strokes. I prefer not to sand at that point and just apply the first coat of film finish. This “freezes” any raised grain and allows it to be easily sanded off without damage to the underlying danish oil. After the first coat of finishit is dry sand very lightly with fine grit again. At this point, I like to use a very smooth sanding block to make sure my sanding results are flat. Repeat the same with each subsequent coat. The final coat can be polished with finer and finer grits including rubbing compound if you like.

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LesB

3136 posts in 4725 days


#5 posted 10-29-2021 01:01 AM

I agree with bilyo’s approach.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Walker's profile

Walker

469 posts in 1754 days


#6 posted 10-29-2021 01:31 AM

I like to use #0000 steel wool between/after coats of danish oil and pretty much every other type of finish.

-- ~Walker

View RyanGi's profile

RyanGi

95 posts in 319 days


#7 posted 10-29-2021 05:30 AM



I like to use #0000 steel wool between/after coats of danish oil and pretty much every other type of finish.

- Walker

Have you ever had problems with black specs of oxidation showing up later when using water borne finishes? I’ve had concerns about leaving specs of wool behind and them oxidizing.

-- Ryan/// I like chips...and sawdust...but mostly chips...with vinegar

View Mattew123's profile

Mattew123

33 posts in 147 days


#8 posted 10-29-2021 09:49 AM



My opinion is slightly different. If you sand the danish oil at all, do it with a very fine grit (higher than 220) and use a very light touch and very few strokes. I prefer not to sand at that point and just apply the first coat of film finish. This “freezes” any raised grain and allows it to be easily sanded off without damage to the underlying danish oil. After the first coat of finishit is dry sand very lightly with fine grit again. At this point, I like to use a very smooth sanding block to make sure my sanding results are flat. Repeat the same with each subsequent coat. The final coat can be polished with finer and finer grits including rubbing compound if you like.

- bilyo

I absolutely agree with this. I don’t like to sand Danish oil either

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2893 posts in 3272 days


#9 posted 10-29-2021 02:30 PM

A lite denib pass with 600 gr. Only where you feel the nibs. Sandpaper levels, scotchbrite or steel wool abrades/roughs up the surface for adhesion since it flexes, and is useless for denibbing. Since it has had over a week to cure, I would do both to improve adhesion. You dont have to allow that much time when covering with solvent poly. WB you do.

You really dont need danish oil. Read through this.

View Walker's profile

Walker

469 posts in 1754 days


#10 posted 11-01-2021 04:26 AM


I like to use #0000 steel wool between/after coats of danish oil and pretty much every other type of finish.

- Walker

Have you ever had problems with black specs of oxidation showing up later when using water borne finishes? I’ve had concerns about leaving specs of wool behind and them oxidizing.

- RyanGi

I’ve never noticed any specs, and I do frequently use water-based poly as a top coat. The steel wool does seem to shed quite a bit. After using it, I’ll blow off the workpiece with the air compressor and hit it with a horsehair bench brush.

-- ~Walker

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