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Thin Kerf Blade ?

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Forum topic by ljislink posted 10-26-2021 07:51 PM 519 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ljislink

23 posts in 103 days


10-26-2021 07:51 PM

I’ve been using a Freud 30T Glue line thin kerf blade on 5/4 & thinner hardwoods with great results. I noticed on Freud web site they recommend this blade for stock 1” or less, I’m guessing it my be due to blade deflection on thicker materiel but not sure of that. Can any one confirm that or know why they recommend that ?
Thanks


13 replies so far

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Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 305 days


#1 posted 10-27-2021 07:12 AM

As I understand, you can use it to cut thicker stock. But, you start to see a degradation in cut quality past an inch. Obviously, YMMV, as there are too many variables to speak in absolutes.

When I bought my new saw (Delta 725 T2), I was enamored with the idea of a glue line rip blade. Fortunately, after doing some research, I decided I’d be better served by a high quality 24T ripping blade.

Went with Ridge Carbide (full kerf) and have been super impressed. That thing is outstanding. Super clean rips in all sorts of materials and thicknesses. Even with plywood I find it leaves a nice clean finish.

The only thing I found it wasn’t suited for was some 1/8” Basswood. Not really surprising though. The tooth count is just too aggressive for something like that.

I was planning to add a comparable quality combination/general purpose blade. But, this 24t has proven to be so versatile that I haven’t yet felt the need. As I do have a cheap-ish 50t if the need arises.

I’m not saying that you need to drop the glue line rip blade. I’ve just concluded that (IMHO) they’re somewhat of a novelty. As I get equal or better results with my RC blade, but don’t have to worry about stock thickness.

If you are in the market to give one a try. I’d look at Ridge Carbide, Leitz, or Tenryu. And if the price is a concern, CMT’s Orange Chrome line is arguably in the same class as the former blades, but at around 1/2 to 2/3 the price.

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Madmark2

3158 posts in 1875 days


#2 posted 10-27-2021 08:34 AM

I resaw 1×6’s with my Freud LU83 TK combo blade all the time. It also crosscuts like silk. I don’t swap blades anymore and my glue lines are clean TYVM! LOL

Freud teeth are sharpened on the sides as well as the tops. This is why I get glassy crosscuts. Other brands do this as well, Amana, etc. But cheaper blades don’t always.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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HokieKen

19900 posts in 2425 days


#3 posted 10-27-2021 01:52 PM

They probably base that recommendation on objective measurements they can take in a lab. Like blade temperature and current draw on the motor. It’s possible that on thicker material the thinner blade with that particular tooth grind just crosses the line of their recommended criteria. There are multiple things that can affect that like feed rate, motor power/speed, type of wood, etc. though. And their criteria are probably far more conservative than yours or mine for what constitutes an effective blade. If you’re getting good clean cuts in 5/4 boards with that blade, I wouldn’t give it a second thought and just keep on truckin’!

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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knotscott

8434 posts in 4662 days


#4 posted 10-27-2021 05:15 PM

The TK version certainly doesn’t improve it’s thick rip capability but I suspect it’s the side angle geometries that dictate the specified range for that type blade. The Freud 30T GLR blades have a tight side clearance angle that puts a bit more polish to the cut edges, which in turn produces more friction. Cutting thicker wood with the GLRs is possible, but is more likely to result in some burning than a similar tooth blade with more side clearance or a 24T blade. Some wood is more prone to burning than others, so those will be the most prone to burning.

You can try raising the blade a bit higher to reduce the number of teeth in the cut, and you can also dimension the lumber prior to ripping….flat straight stock cuts better than uneven boards that are fighting the blade with lateral pressure.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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ljislink

23 posts in 103 days


#5 posted 10-27-2021 07:43 PM

Thanks for the replies, I think I’ll try one of those Ridge blades & after looking at there web site I’m considering there 40T combo TS2000 reviews say it rips great with very smooth cuts. Just not sure if I should get a TK or FK as my saw is a Grizzly G0899 2hp motor. The blade that came with saw is FK and the Freud TK cuts about 100 times better. I know the blade that came with saw is probably junk it’s a 40T combo but I’m wondering if part of the reason the the TK rips better is because of the 2hp motor.

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Ocelot

3566 posts in 3925 days


#6 posted 10-27-2021 08:37 PM

It may have to do with the capacity of the gullets to carry sawdust.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 305 days


#7 posted 10-28-2021 05:58 AM



Thanks for the replies, I think I ll try one of those Ridge blades & after looking at there web site I m considering there 40T combo TS2000 reviews say it rips great with very smooth cuts. Just not sure if I should get a TK or FK as my saw is a Grizzly G0899 2hp motor. The blade that came with saw is FK and the Freud TK cuts about 100 times better. I know the blade that came with saw is probably junk it s a 40T combo but I m wondering if part of the reason the the TK rips better is because of the 2hp motor.

- ljislink

I’d go full kerf. My saw is a Delta 725 T2 (1.75 hp roughly). Handles the full kerf just fine. I’ve even run an amp meter on it at no-load and under load to see if it was working overtime. Nearly no difference in the draw (11 amps vs 11.2 amps).

The advantages to running a full kerf are many. Only reason I’ll go back to thin kerf is if I end up with a saw that simply can’t handle a full kerf.

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jonah

2258 posts in 4585 days


#8 posted 10-28-2021 06:04 PM

You won’t see a difference with no load with a full kerf blade. The difference will show up when cutting dense or thick wood. The extra weight with no load isn’t huge, but pushing ~30% wider teeth through thick wood is harder.

Saw alignment also plays a role as well, of course. If the saw isn’t dialed in, it’s harder on the motor.

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Rich

7569 posts in 1876 days


#9 posted 10-28-2021 06:19 PM

I think the kerf debate is overrated. The quality of the blade is more important than the kerf width in my experience.

I’ve always used thin kerf blades with a Forrest blade stiffener on my table saw. Works well for me. I use a thin kerf blade on my miter saw too, and the cuts are flawless. The table saw blade is a thin kerf Forrest WWII and the miter blade is a Freud – LU91R010 sliding miter blade with a negative rake angle.

Heck, my new track saw has 1.8mm kerf blades. That’s just a hair over 1/16”. I get glass smooth cuts with it as well.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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LeeRoyMan

2261 posts in 1013 days


#10 posted 10-28-2021 06:31 PM



I think the kerf debate is overrated. The quality of the blade is more important than the kerf width in my experience.

I ve always used thin kerf blades with a Forrest blade stiffener on my table saw. Works well for me. I use a thin kerf blade on my miter saw too, and the cuts are flawless. The table saw blade is a thin kerf Forrest WWII and the miter blade is a Freud – LU91R010 sliding miter blade with a negative rake angle.

Heck, my new track saw has 1.8mm kerf blades. That s just a hair over 1/16”. I get glass smooth cuts with it as well.

- Rich


hmmm, I’m gunna have to get me one of those, what are they called, Tinkurf blades?
Should work goud with an 8” shtiffner.

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 305 days


#11 posted 10-29-2021 02:54 AM


You won t see a difference with no load with a full kerf blade. The difference will show up when cutting dense or thick wood. The extra weight with no load isn t huge, but pushing ~30% wider teeth through thick wood is harder.

Saw alignment also plays a role as well, of course. If the saw isn t dialed in, it s harder on the motor.

- jonah

My amperage readings weren’t thin kerf vs full kerf. It was no-load with full kerf, and then under load with a full kerf blade ripping 4 foot segments of 2” oak. Sorry, probably wasn’t as clear as I could have been with that previous post.

In short, ripping 2” thick oak only resulted in a .2-ish increase in amperage draw. But I have to imagine the quality of the Ridge Carbide blade plays a roll in keeping the demand on the saw relatively unchanged.

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KTNC

196 posts in 1543 days


#12 posted 11-06-2021 04:32 PM

I ve even run an amp meter on it at no-load and under load to see if it was working overtime. Nearly no difference in the draw (11 amps vs 11.2 amps).

- Wood_Scraps

Hi WoodScraps:

I’ve never done that experiment myself – testing amps. I admit that I don’t know a lot about motors, but I’m very surprised to hear that a motor running under no-load would consume 11 AMPS. I know the motor has to overcome the friction in the bearings, but where else is all the energy going?

What are the volts and amp ratings on your motor?

regards, Kerry

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DougC

27 posts in 3920 days


#13 posted 11-07-2021 03:47 PM

+1 on Forrest WWII blades – mine have never let me down ! And when they need to be sharpened, I send them back to Forrest (don’t take them to a local sharpening source) and they are returned just like new !!! They are a bit pricey, but do perform.

I use the standard kerf blade on my saw, but did get one of my son in laws a thin kerf Forrest for his 1.5 hp saw. On Forrest’s web site, they do not have a max thickness callout for the thin kerf, they just state “RAISE the blade for THICK woods. LOWER the blade for THIN woods and get perfect cuts every time.”

https://www.forrestblades.com/woodworker-ii-thin-kerf/

(I do not have any connection to Forrest, am just a very pleased customer : )) )

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