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Delta 725 T2 - My 3D Printed Upgrades

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Forum topic by Wood_Scraps posted 10-26-2021 05:47 AM 504 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


10-26-2021 05:47 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw delta 725 t2 dust collection throat plate 3d printed

Hey Folks!

Had posted a question in another thread relating to an upgrade I’d designed for my T2 Delta 725 table saw, and figured I’d start a dedicated thread to showcase my designs.

Thus far, I’ve essentially designed 3 different add-ons. Two being for improving dust collection. And the other is a custom throat plate that accepts interchangeable inserts. Details on all the components are outlined below.

Under the throat plate dust deflector

Anyone who has this saw knows the biggest weak point is dust collection. There’s a lot of open space in front of the blade on the underside of the table. So sawdust gets thrown all over the floor and out the front of the saw. I pretty much eliminated this issue with the addition of a dust deflector. This clips on to the metallic portion of the blade cover/chute underneath the table top. It blocks off the area in front of the blade, diverting all the dust down towards the bottom dust port. It can quickly be removed when you want to make beveled cuts. As it can’t remain installed due to the fact that the whole blade housing moves when you bevel the saw.


Deflector close-up


Deflector installed

Over blade dust chute

This one has made a massive difference in dust collection. This saw is notorious for throwing sawdust all over the table. So I had to come up with a solution. The chute will connect to a standard 2.5” DC hose. Or, can be connected to a shop vac with a companion coupler. It also includes a clip-on tab that goes at the front of the chute. Directly ahead of the main blade guard body.

The chute attaches with a heavy duty velcro. So it’s easy to remove and install. While also providing an excellent seal. To further improve the seal, I taped off the sides of the blade guard. As the plastic wings have a lot of holes and gaps.

I currently have it hooked up to a mediocre, entry-level shop vac. But the results are still impressive. I may ultimately run my DC unit to the chute. Which is currently devoted to the rear stock dust port. But, it’s only a 660 CFM unit. So, I’ll probably want to upgrade if I’m going to split it between two dust ports. Still, I’m in no rush because the performance is so outstanding.


Primary blade chute


Shop vac coupler


Clip on deflector tab


Alternate view of the clip on deflector tab


Complete installed chute setup

Here’s a video of the whole system in action. Ripping 1/8” off the edge of a 4 foot sheet of MDF. Which is arguably the worst type of cut for producing loads of sawdust. As you can see, there’s very little dust that ends up on the table. Which if you are familiar with this saw is a pretty big deal, lol.

https://youtu.be/uEPSYy9FEDo

Throat plate with interchangeable MDF inserts

This is definitely what I’m most proud of. Gone is the drawer full of throat plates of varying materials and thicknesses. Hello do-it-all plate!

This accepts 1/2” MDF inserts. They’re secured in place via a dovetail channel. And can be quickly swapped out without the need for any tools. Inserts can be cut for every bevel angle from 90 to 45. And it’ll just as easily accommodate a full dado stack. It works with the stock riving knife. But could also be set up for an MJ splitter if that’s what the user desires. On top of all this, it has ventilation slots on the left side. Which further improve overall airflow and dust collection.

Additionally, it has a couple features that further enhance the functionality. One being a couple of “kerf retainer slots” at the rear of the dovetail channel. This helps to ensure that, once cut, the kerf of the ZCI can’t close on itself. Second, it has leveling screws built into the MDF channel. The idea here is that a MDF sheet could be slightly too thin. Causing it to sit below the plate body. But no worries. Just use the 4 set screws to raise the MDF flush with the plate.

One other thing to note is that it’s actually printed in two halves. It’s joined with opposing dovetails. Which are CA glued together. The joint is then “welded” together with a soldering iron. It’s durable, rigid, versatile, and just the perfect complement to this saw.


Plate with no insert


A few completed plates with 45 degree inserts installed


MDF Retainers (kind of hard to make them out)


MDF cut for the retaining channels


Embedded nuts that accept set screws for raising/leveling the MDF (you can also make out the welded dovetail joint)


Installed plate in a 90 degree configuration

I think that about does it. Altogether, these add-ons made solid saw a truly outstanding saw. I’m super happy with the results. And even print some up for sale on a limited basis. Feel free to ask questions or even offer feedback and suggestions for improvements. Or maybe future additions to further improve this saw.


14 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

2056 posts in 3599 days


#1 posted 10-26-2021 11:11 PM

3D printers are great for making shop improvements. Thanks for posting your projects.

There’s another welding method you might want to try. Chuck a piece of filament in a dremel. The friction between rotating filament and the workpiece is enough to melt plastic and create a weld bead. I tried it on a custom vacuum sweep and it worked well. Downside is the short piece of filament doesn’t last long so it’s only good for small welds.

The sweep mentioned above has a 30 degree angle instead of the usual 45 degree angle on typical Shop Vac sweeps. The lower angle makes it easier to run it along the top of CNC beds.

-- See my work at http://altaredesign.com

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


#2 posted 10-27-2021 12:06 AM



3D printers are great for making shop improvements. Thanks for posting your projects.

There s another welding method you might want to try. Chuck a piece of filament in a dremel. The friction between rotating filament and the workpiece is enough to melt plastic and create a weld bead. I tried it on a custom vacuum sweep and it worked well. Downside is the short piece of filament doesn t last long so it s only good for small welds.

The sweep mentioned above has a 30 degree angle instead of the usual 45 degree angle on typical Shop Vac sweeps. The lower angle makes it easier to run it along the top of CNC beds.

- JAAune

Agreed! Have made all sorts of things for tools around the shop. Vac attachment for my circ saw. Case for my gauge blocks. All of the above stuff. Miter gauge for my dial indicator. Only limit is your imagination. And, I suppose CAD skills matters a little, lol.

When investigating what to do with mating pieces, I did see the Dremel method of welding. My primary focus was strength. And, IIRC, the dremel welded joint wasn’t really great in the strength department. Thinking because it’s a really shallow bond. But they do look the most like an actual weld.

The strongest were CA glue and welding with a 3d pen (they didn’t test the soldering iron). I tired the 3d pen and didn’t care for it. Maybe it was just the cheap model. But it was super clunky and tough to control consistency. For my application, I don’t really care if the joint is perfect in appearance. So the soldering iron is the winner in my book as far as welding. Super quick. Like I can solder both dovetails on a plate in well under 5 minutes. The CA glue at the outset is just added insurance.

I’d be interested to see some of what you’ve done. There’s a huge application for custom vac fittings. Already had a couple custom jobs for exactly that from a guy who bought one of my complete DC kits.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1212 posts in 3567 days


#3 posted 10-27-2021 01:16 AM

Awesome! I just picked up a 3D printer and one of the first things I printed was a new blade insert for my bandsaw.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC

View gtrgeo's profile

gtrgeo

197 posts in 1712 days


#4 posted 10-27-2021 05:35 AM

I am curious. Are you using PLA for these parts? I have mostly been using PETG for durability but find it tends to be less rigid most of what I have done is vacuum or dust collection adapters but I have been working on some upgrades to my track saw lately.

Thanks, George.

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


#5 posted 10-27-2021 06:39 AM



Awesome! I just picked up a 3D printer and one of the first things I printed was a new blade insert for my bandsaw.

- SuperCubber

Nice! It’s awesome all the things you can do with a printer. Started out just wanting to make some stuff for myself. But has also turned into a nice little side hustle. Already had put something together for my circular saw as well. Next up is seeing if I can tackle my miter saw’s dust collection.

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Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


#6 posted 10-27-2021 06:48 AM



I am curious. Are you using PLA for these parts? I have mostly been using PETG for durability but find it tends to be less rigid most of what I have done is vacuum or dust collection adapters but I have been working on some upgrades to my track saw lately.

Thanks, George.

- gtrgeo

Been using PLA+ exclusively. Specifically Polymaker Tough PLA and 3D Fuel PLA+. Started with these due to the ease of printing. Thought I’d want to jump to ABS or PETG. But frankly don’t see a reason to take on that learning curve just yet.

The PLA+ has been an outstanding material. Plenty rigid. While also offering some flex when I want it. Just as strong as ABS. And the 3D Fuel version can be annealed if heat is a concern. Without annealing, both are good to at least 60c. But the annealed 3D Fuel PLA+ bumps that up to 90c.

One other really nice thing about the PLA+ is the ease of post processing. It can be easily drilled and/or sanded. For those, I will say that Polymaker Tough PLA gets the nod. But the 3D Fuel is no slouch.

Just ordered some of Polymaker’s new PolyTerra PLA+. Looks like it’ll be really close to their Tough PLA. The upside is that it’s significantly less expensive. $25 for 1kg vs. $32 for 750g. 3D Fuel is kind of in the middle at $30 per 1kg spool.

Would be interested to see some of your designs.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

2056 posts in 3599 days


#7 posted 10-29-2021 02:56 PM

In our shop we use PLA and PETG. PETG is used wherever we need parts that are less brittle. Cost difference is only around $4 more per roll for PETG at around $32/roll from 3dxtech.com.

With a Prusa printer, PETG is as easy as PLA. I haven’t tested ABS yet but we don’t have the printer hooked up to ventilation yet and I haven’t seen the need to use ABS over PETG yet.

Long term I want to setup for nylon so we can print functional parts for machinery. That requires a heated enclosure so it’s not the simplest thing to do.

Project pictures are going to be posted at the 3D printing thread so check there later today if you want to see them.

-- See my work at http://altaredesign.com

View Jimarco's profile

Jimarco

82 posts in 2389 days


#8 posted 10-29-2021 07:51 PM

I have that table saw. When the part(s) are available, I’m a buyer.

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


#9 posted 10-30-2021 12:09 AM



In our shop we use PLA and PETG. PETG is used wherever we need parts that are less brittle. Cost difference is only around $4 more per roll for PETG at around $32/roll from 3dxtech.com.

With a Prusa printer, PETG is as easy as PLA. I haven t tested ABS yet but we don t have the printer hooked up to ventilation yet and I haven t seen the need to use ABS over PETG yet.

Long term I want to setup for nylon so we can print functional parts for machinery. That requires a heated enclosure so it s not the simplest thing to do.

Project pictures are going to be posted at the 3D printing thread so check there later today if you want to see them.

- JAAune

I’m sure I’ll play around with PETG at some point. Cost isn’t the issue. Heck, the PLA+ I use is more expensive than the 3dxtech referenced above.

What it comes down to is the learning curve. I’ve got a really solid profile dialed in for the PLA+ brands I use. And is plenty durable and “flexy”. It’s not at all brittle like standard PLA. I’ve dropped one of the above dust chutes from 6 feet onto concrete. Landed on a corner with barely a scratch. Didn’t crack, split, or anything. Its overall specs are equivalent to ABS. With the one exception of heat resistance. But, in my applications so far, that hasn’t been a concern.

I’ll still look into the 3dxtech when I want to start experimenting with ABS. Appreciate the tip.

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


#10 posted 10-30-2021 12:11 AM



I have that table saw. When the part(s) are available, I m a buyer.

- Jimarco

Shoot me a PM. Only thing I haven’t done any runs yet with is the throat plate.

View Walker's profile

Walker

469 posts in 1754 days


#11 posted 11-01-2021 05:04 AM

If you did a run of the throat plate I might be a buyer too.

A suggested improvement, I don’t see a way to access the throat plate leveling screws (the oem ones on the saw, not the ones for the mdf insert). Also, I can’t tell from your pictures, but is there a retainer clip or tab of any sort for a positive stop, keeping the throat plate from coming up unexpectedly?

I have a zci for my dado stack I made out of hardwood. It was really labor intensive to get all the little cut outs right for a good tight fit. Thus I’ve only made one for 3/4” cuts. With your solution, it would be much easier to make a bunch for different sizes.

-- ~Walker

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


#12 posted 11-01-2021 05:37 AM



If you did a run of the throat plate I might be a buyer too.

A suggested improvement, I don t see a way to access the throat plate leveling screws (the oem ones on the saw, not the ones for the mdf insert). Also, I can t tell from your pictures, but is there a retainer clip or tab of any sort for a positive stop, keeping the throat plate from coming up unexpectedly?

I have a zci for my dado stack I made out of hardwood. It was really labor intensive to get all the little cut outs right for a good tight fit. Thus I ve only made one for 3/4” cuts. With your solution, it would be much easier to make a bunch for different sizes.

- Walker

I’ll be printing some up soon. Will keep you posted.

As far as the leveling screws. You could easily drill it out if you wanted. I thought about adding them. But, once the plate is initially leveled, you never have to mess with it again. As the MDF insert is the only thing that changes.

No retention tab or anything to keep the plate from coming up. The way it’s configured now (kind of dumb luck) is that the front most leveling protrusions on the saw index pretty snug against the cutouts plate. I also figured that all of the MDF plates on the market don’t make use of any retention. And I’ve been using an earlier iteration for around 6 months with no issues.

View Walker's profile

Walker

469 posts in 1754 days


#13 posted 11-02-2021 03:30 AM

I suppose accessing the leveling screws would not be an issue if you only ever use that one throat plate. (and of course that’s the point). I use them every time I switch plates though, because each one I have is not exactly the same fit.

I believe the retention device is an extra level of precaution. During a kickback, or really any blade deflection, the blade could grab the insert and send it flying along with the workpiece. Like most safety devices, you don’t need it until you need it.

My dado zci is crude, but functions well. I used a machine screw, 2 nuts and a keyhole hanger to make a locking tab. From the top of the insert, I can use a screwdriver to swing it into/out of position.

-- ~Walker

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Wood_Scraps

203 posts in 301 days


#14 posted 11-02-2021 06:45 AM



I suppose accessing the leveling screws would not be an issue if you only ever use that one throat plate. (and of course that s the point). I use them every time I switch plates though, because each one I have is not exactly the same fit.

I believe the retention device is an extra level of precaution. During a kickback, or really any blade deflection, the blade could grab the insert and send it flying along with the workpiece. Like most safety devices, you don t need it until you need it.

My dado zci is crude, but functions well. I used a machine screw, 2 nuts and a keyhole hanger to make a locking tab. From the top of the insert, I can use a screwdriver to swing it into/out of position.

- Walker

Hey, if it works, who cares if it’s a little crude. I have plenty of stuff in my shop that meets that criteria :)

It wouldn’t be difficult to add leveling screw cutouts. But, as you state, the whole point of the plate is to have a one-size fits all that never has to be adjusted. This plate will handle everything from 90 to 45. Along with any size dado stack that the saw can accommodate. But, I may decided to add the option to level from the top. It certainly won’t hurt anything.

I don’t disagree with you about the insurance of a retention component. And it’d be relatively easy to work into the plate. The solution you have makes a lot of sense and would be pretty easy to execute.

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