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Choosing a planer

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Forum topic by oach posted 10-26-2021 02:31 AM 614 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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oach

10 posts in 48 days


10-26-2021 02:31 AM

Topic tags/keywords: planer

Hi All,

Weekend warrior. I am looking for a planer as I am tired of sanding so much. I would be using it for hard wood a d soft but needs to be capable. Prefer used as I am unsure how much use in the long run (why spend the money). Appreciate feedback on brands, models, and what to look for when buying a planer. Especially a used one.

Thank you for your time and assistance.


28 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4129 posts in 3080 days


#1 posted 10-26-2021 02:33 AM

Let me be the first to suggest a dewalt 735. If you can find one .
It’s the best portable planer made and the loudest too. :)
Good Luck

-- Aj

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3050 posts in 883 days


#2 posted 10-26-2021 09:43 AM

I was looking and saw a DW734 for $250 and after calling drove 10 minutes to get it and he said someone just left with it. I decided that with the risk of possible problems and it immediately needing a fresh set of blades, the cost was getting to close to what the new one is. If you search for the DW735X the X is for the in/outfeed tables and an extra set of blades and they are reversible too. Very solid for the money but others may have some more models to choose from. If running any big box store stock through remember to check for bar code staples on the ends of the boards, do ask me how I know.

View StevoWevo's profile

StevoWevo

54 posts in 131 days


#3 posted 10-26-2021 11:59 AM

I have a 734 and it does ok for me in the time being. The biggest issue is that my shopvac, a 9 gallon Ridgid can not keep it from clogging because of the 4”=>2” reducer fitting. The 735 has an ejection fan built in and is a much better machine IMO.

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

7292 posts in 3775 days


#4 posted 10-26-2021 12:27 PM

The 735 is the standard to judge all benchtop models against. It’s certainly the tops in that group as far as I’m concerned. Finding a used one may take some time.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2893 posts in 3272 days


#5 posted 10-26-2021 12:39 PM

A machine planer surface still requires sanding (I have a dw735). Handplanes can do all aspects of dimensioning, flattening glue ups, and surface prep, tho require some skill building, physical work, and depending on how deep you go arent necessarily cheaper. For me all planed and other surfaces get prepped with a smoother, then lightly sanded with 220 or 320 by hand before finishing.

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Knockonit

1015 posts in 1484 days


#6 posted 10-26-2021 12:50 PM

in the shop there is three different units a small 12inch delta, used for quick small clean ups, the 735 that since getting the griz 15inch doens’t get much use. the delta with decently sharp blades does a lot of small things, but when the job is a gaggle of pcs, big boy is fired up, quieter than the small ones, and does one heckuva job, does not have the spiral cutters, but soon, it may have
that has been my experience with planners, any planner IMO, with sharp blades will get it done, patience and learning the most efficient feed rate and depth is the winner of the day

rj in az

-- Living the dream

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

7744 posts in 3003 days


#7 posted 10-26-2021 01:18 PM

I have a DW734 and it’s been very robust, I bought one new for $300 a long time ago then decided I didn’t need it and returned it. I immediately regretted that when the price jumped to $350 and found myself needing a planer again. I ended up buying a used one that had less than 10 minutes run time for $200, about 10 years ago now. It does an admirable job plowing off stock and leaving a nice finish provided the blades are sharp, dull ones slow the machine signficantly. Blades are available from DeWalt and the aftermarket with varying degrees of quality and a Byrd (others too) helical cutterhead are available in the $400 range. Dust collection is good with a proper dust collector and the factory dust chute.

I have sort of outgrown it as I now have a sawmill so I bought a 5hp, 18” Rockwell planer to handle the bigger stuff but the DW734 still has its place.

FWIW, my unlce has the DW735 and has installed a Byrd cutterhead. The dust collection is also good, snipe could be easier to avoid (if I didn’t know how to setup my 734) and it has the same power (same motor) but adds 1/2” of cutting width. The Byrd does a great job of noise reduction and avoiding tearout on highly figured grain, the carbide inserts should last 10-20 times longer than factory HSS knives before they need to be turned to a fresh edge.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Robert's profile

Robert

4783 posts in 2763 days


#8 posted 10-26-2021 01:41 PM

I would encourage you not to think of a planer as a surfacer, but rather a dimensioner.

I agree your best bet is a lunchbox. Just bear in mind they have limitations.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View oach's profile

oach

10 posts in 48 days


#9 posted 10-26-2021 02:15 PM

Thank you all for your input.

When it comes to used/new. Am I better off getting new since I know the cutters are sharp?

View RClark's profile

RClark

186 posts in 3467 days


#10 posted 10-26-2021 02:17 PM


I would encourage you not to think of a planer as a surfacer, but rather a dimensioner.

I agree your best bet is a lunchbox. Just bear in mind they have limitations.

- Robert

Agreed.

To the OP: If you are using a power sander to take off lots of material, I can believe you are getting very tired of the experience.

Planers are great for taking stock to the desired thickness, but there will still be final sanding involved. There are a number of ways to do that, but that wasn’t really your question.

I agree with the others above regarding the DeWalt line of planers. I have a 20 year old Delta 12.5” benchtop; I don’t recommend any of the new Delta equipment these days. When my Delta fails, it will be replaced with a DeWalt benchtop (likely the 735) or a larger Powermatic 15” planer.

If you’d like to understand the difference between the DeWalt planer models, a Google search of “DeWalt 734 versus 735” will bring up some informative information.

-- Ray

View KTNC's profile

KTNC

196 posts in 1538 days


#11 posted 10-26-2021 03:12 PM


Hi All, Prefer used as I am unsure how much use in the long run (why spend the money). Appreciate feedback on brands, models, and what to look for when buying a planer. Especially a used one.

Thank you for your time and assistance.

- oach

Hi oach:
I was lucky enough to get a used Delta planer for $75 and I am pleased wit it. It had knives with 2 sides – I just had to rotate them to get a fresh set exposed. Before I brought it home, the seller demonstrated it’s use for me so I knew it ran OK. I was able to download a user manual and went through the maintenance section which was pretty easy.

regards, Kerry

View BradNayler's profile

BradNayler

5 posts in 35 days


#12 posted 10-26-2021 04:15 PM

My first post! Here goes, have you considered building an easy to build sander? Youtube has many examples. I have a planer, but i built one to save on my planer, just a thought.

View oach's profile

oach

10 posts in 48 days


#13 posted 10-26-2021 04:23 PM

My first post! Here goes, have you considered building an easy to build sander? Youtube has many examples.

Never even heard of that. I will have to look that up. Is searching “easy to build sander” enough?

I would encourage you not to think of a planer as a surfacer, but rather a dimensioner.

That is exactly what I need to do: dimension the wood. I do realize I still have to sand.

View BradNayler's profile

BradNayler

5 posts in 35 days


#14 posted 10-26-2021 04:37 PM

“home built DRUM sander” If you do not signify DRUM, you will most likely get all sorts of sanding projects. Take a look at what $60 did for 1 guy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BM3f6j-ej8
BradNayler

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3050 posts in 883 days


#15 posted 10-26-2021 04:55 PM


When it comes to used/new. Am I better off getting new since I know the cutters are sharp?

- oach


Sometimes it is not possible to run some boards though before buying and sometimes it is. I just assume the blades need replacement on any tool I buy used and figure that into my total cost. Who puts sharp blades on a tool they are selling? I also factor in that some people will dump a tool with a problem off on the buyer. So as I get close to the cost of new when allowing for those possible scenario’s I opt for new. There are a lot of things the can get of of whack in a planner that are hard to get back in calibration. I also saw so few hit the market I guess I gave up.

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