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Forum topic by Scott216 posted 10-19-2021 12:59 PM 250 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Scott216

4 posts in 3306 days


10-19-2021 12:59 PM

I want to make a 27” diameter outdoor table. I’m in NJ and it will mostly be in shade. I’m gonna have a vinyl cover made to protect the table from the elements. I’m planning on making the table out of Sepele. I want to have a full-size peace sign inlay in the table. I’m looking for advice on the inlay and wood movement. I want the inlay to be a dark wood, but I haven’t decided on what to use. I’d appreciate an suggestions. Woods I’m considering are Ipe (I know this is a good wood for outdoors), bubinga, walnut. There are two different approaches I’m considering for the peace sign. First is to make the tabletop out of sepele, then use the CNC to cut a shallow peace sign pocket, maybe 1/4” deep, then glue the dark wood into the peace sign pocket. I’d have the grain of both woods go in the same direction. The other option is to make the peace sign the same thickness as the sepele, them put it all together with dowel tenons. I’d still have all the grain go in the same direction. I’d appreciate any advice or potential problems.


6 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1421 posts in 2385 days


#1 posted 10-21-2021 02:09 PM

I am skeptical of any wood work for out doors that includes close fitting machined parts. The only thing certain out doors is that wood moves. and sometimes unpredictably. Your thinking, so far, is probably correct but I would add the following suggestions:
-Make sure the two contrasting woods you select have a similar rate of expansion and contraction.
-However you fasten the table top to it’s base, make sure you allow for expansion and contraction.
-I assume you are thinking of making the top as a glued up panel. I think it would be better to make it like a picnic table with a small gap between planks. However, as the whole top is relatively small, what you are doing may work out OK but prepare yourself for cracks and warps.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

6067 posts in 3633 days


#2 posted 10-21-2021 05:50 PM

I think it would be better to make it like a picnic table with a small gap between planks.

I agree with this statement.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Scott216

4 posts in 3306 days


#3 posted 10-21-2021 10:14 PM

I would like the expansion characteristics of the two woods be similar and have thought about this. I’m having trouble finding that info for ipe and bubinga. Plus, I don’t know if bubinga is a good wood for being outside. I’m considering using it because I have some and it’s a nice looking wood.

I did consider making the tabletop with gaps like a picnic table or deck. I don’t think that would look as good, but it may be the better option. I’ll model it on my computer and see how it looks.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4129 posts in 3080 days


#4 posted 10-22-2021 12:33 AM

Outdoor tables must be built differently then indoor tables. Pieces or parts should be smaller much smaller with gaps. If you look on line at teak outdoor patio furniture you’ll get the idea.
The picnic style table is a very good design. It’s been tested in thousands of national parks and campgrounds.
Ipe would be the best choice. The other woods you mentioned seems like a waste of money.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8204 posts in 2670 days


#5 posted 10-22-2021 01:02 AM

I don’t think that an inlay is a good idea. I think it will come apart. Water will seep in, get under and never dry out causing it to come loose or worse, expand and break loose. I would make it like a picnic table with the inlay part (doves foot) pieced together so it looks like a single piece with the surrounding pieces separated by small gaps. Instead of sapele, I would look at black locust. It is often used in decks and the radial and tangential shrinkage rates are not too different than ipe.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Scott216

4 posts in 3306 days


#6 posted 10-22-2021 07:35 PM


I don t think that an inlay is a good idea. I think it will come apart. Water will seep in, get under and never dry out causing it to come loose or worse, expand and break loose. I would make it like a picnic table with the inlay part (doves foot) pieced together so it looks like a single piece with the surrounding pieces separated by small gaps. Instead of sapele, I would look at black locust. It is often used in decks and the radial and tangential shrinkage rates are not too different than ipe.

- Lazyman

Thanks. That’s a good point about the water getting under the inlay; I didn’t think about that.

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