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Table saw dust collection / magnetic sheet

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Forum topic by JKB33 posted 10-14-2021 09:39 PM 573 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JKB33

28 posts in 246 days


10-14-2021 09:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collection tablesaw dust collection magnetic sheet

I have an old Jet tablesaw that I’ve made an aluminum dust port for . I still need to block the open back around the motor to keep the dust going down to the port.
I’m wondering if anyone has used a magnetic sheet to do this. The entire edge would accept the magnet but I’m worried there would be too much “open” space and the sheet might fall.
Has anyone done this successfully and if so what thickness of sheet did you use?
Thanks


13 replies so far

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

1415 posts in 1923 days


#1 posted 10-14-2021 10:49 PM

Could you post a picture of what you have now? Itd not clear to me where you want to stick the magnet, what forces will be applied to it, and why a magnetic sheet makes sense. A picture would probably help:)

Oh man, your bandsaw boxes look AMAZING. what wood is the one in your profile pic? Hoping you say QS sycamore but it’s too dark…

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Ruscal's profile

Ruscal

125 posts in 460 days


#2 posted 10-15-2021 03:27 PM

If its a contractor saw with the motor hanging out the back, 1/4 plywood works. Get some small round rare earth magnets, use a forstner bit to recess and glue them in. I had to make my rear cover in two pieces and you have to remove it to tilt the blade. Start with a cardboard template. Check the template with the blade raised and lowered and allow belt clearance.

-- Have a hobby? You should have a business.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1764 posts in 2918 days


#3 posted 10-15-2021 03:46 PM

I used strips of a magnet board that we used for magnet signs for cars. It works well and pulls off easy when you need to tilt the arbor. I built a angled box for the bottom of my JET 64A.
It works pretty well in unison with my SharkGuard.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7292 posts in 3775 days


#4 posted 10-15-2021 03:50 PM

I’d think if you have much of a DC, the magnetic sheet isn’t going to work, unless it’s thicker than most of that stuff. It’s going going to get sucked off the edges, maybe even into the saw cavity. I used 1/8” hardboard and sheet metal screws, though rare earth magnets would have been a better idea.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JKB33's profile

JKB33

28 posts in 246 days


#5 posted 10-16-2021 01:18 PM



Could you post a picture of what you have now? Itd not clear to me where you want to stick the magnet, what forces will be applied to it, and why a magnetic sheet makes sense. A picture would probably help:)

Oh man, your bandsaw boxes look AMAZING. what wood is the one in your profile pic? Hoping you say QS sycamore but it s too dark…

Thanks. That’s lacewood, sometimes called leopardwood.

View JKB33's profile

JKB33

28 posts in 246 days


#6 posted 10-16-2021 01:25 PM



I used strips of a magnet board that we used for magnet signs for cars. It works well and pulls off easy when you need to tilt the arbor. I built a angled box for the bottom of my JET 64A.
It works pretty well in unison with my SharkGuard.

- fivecodys

Do you know the thickness of your board? BTW, love your on/off switch on your tablesaw.

View Mike 's profile

Mike

15 posts in 1724 days


#7 posted 10-18-2021 04:05 AM

Assuming that your saw is a contractors model, here is my solution. I have 2 Delta contractors saws – a 1988 and a 1998 I believe.

I fit 2 pieces of 1/4” hardboard on each which both slide in horizontally. The piece on the belt side goes in first and stays put. One thumbscrew holds both in place and the inside panel is removed for bevel cuts.

My dust collection port is 5” in dia and requires 19 sq in of air. The openings that remain in the hardboard are about 15 sq in. The remaining 4 sq in are in my overblade pickup which is a Sharkguard.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

779 posts in 3014 days


#8 posted 10-18-2021 03:21 PM

I have an older Jet contractor saw and I made something similar to Mike’s (although not nearly as nice) out of cardboard. I hold the cardboard in place with magnets. Occasional I get those free magnetic promotional/advertising magnet sheets—refrigerator magnets—and use those to cover the slots in the front around the openings there.

Even with all the blocking I still get some dust that accumulates inside the saw in the corners. My dust collector connection is only on the bottom of the saw. I think that airflow is an important aspect of getting a more complete dust collection. I’m wondering if there may be some benefit in creating a throat plate that allows air to flow down into the saw.

View Knockonit's profile (online now)

Knockonit

1016 posts in 1484 days


#9 posted 10-18-2021 03:50 PM

haha, i’ve sealed, resealed cussed so much on the dust proofing of my uni saw, i’ve given up, its better, but at the top i’m showered with dust, only on some cuts, not all, but alas, gonna install a fan on my head, see if that keeps it away
happy monday
rj in az

-- Living the dream

View Mike 's profile

Mike

15 posts in 1724 days


#10 posted 10-18-2021 03:59 PM

I have holes in my throat plate and corresponding holes in my sled. Very worthwhile in my opinion.
I also have a cure for those nasty edge trimming, dust spewing cuts. Very simple stacking 1/2”x6” wide mdf pieces held in place with cleats in the miter slot and leading edge.

View Mike 's profile

Mike

15 posts in 1724 days


#11 posted 10-18-2021 08:15 PM

I have been asked for more detail on my crosscut sled by PM and have chosen to reply here in case anyone else is interested.

This sled can be used with overblade dust collection and a riving knife

And a few pics of my saw!

View JKB33's profile

JKB33

28 posts in 246 days


#12 posted 10-18-2021 08:48 PM



I have holes in my throat plate and corresponding holes in my sled. Very worthwhile in my opinion.
I also have a cure for those nasty edge trimming, dust spewing cuts. Very simple stacking 1/2”x6” wide mdf pieces held in place with cleats in the miter slot and leading edge

Yes, I discovered that a zero clearance throat plate just means more dust in my face.

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

257 posts in 2420 days


#13 posted 10-19-2021 02:03 AM


I have been asked for more detail on my crosscut sled by PM and have chosen to reply here in case anyone else is interested.

This sled can be used with overblade dust collection and a riving knife

- Mike

Mike,

Thank you for the quick & helpful response!

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