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Forum topic by Involute posted 10-08-2021 12:40 AM 493 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Involute

12 posts in 2495 days


10-08-2021 12:40 AM

I’m building a cover for our gas meter out of 1×12 poplar planks. I need it to match the house, so I was planning on painting it with a coat of primer and a coat of the same paint that’s on the house. Is there a better way to maximize longevity? Thanks for any tips.


14 replies so far

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FirehouseWoodworking

792 posts in 4728 days


#1 posted 10-08-2021 01:21 AM

You may want to check with your city code dept and fire dept first. In many locations, that would be a code violation and is prohibited.

And from the perspective of a firefighter, that makes it more difficult to locate the meter in the event of a fire,

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

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jonah

2283 posts in 4753 days


#2 posted 10-08-2021 03:02 AM

I’m not aware of anywhere that it’s acceptable to actually cover up a gas meter. You can screen it with some bushes or plants, but you cannot hide it inside a box or shroud.

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SMP

5300 posts in 1360 days


#3 posted 10-08-2021 03:21 AM

I think you can paint most of it and the pipes to match that may help.

View Involute's profile

Involute

12 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 10-08-2021 04:15 AM

Code issues aside, should I be finishing it differently to preserve the wood as long as possible?

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Fred Hargis

7480 posts in 3948 days


#5 posted 10-08-2021 10:28 AM

Your finishing plan is the best choice for a long life, maybe the choice of wood could be better but the primer/paint is a good choice. If the primer is oil based it will be even better.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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jonah

2283 posts in 4753 days


#6 posted 10-08-2021 11:41 AM

I’d probably put primer then two coats of paint, personally, but that’s just me.

View JIMMIEM's profile

JIMMIEM

261 posts in 2296 days


#7 posted 10-08-2021 12:04 PM

Have you considered using PVC (AZEK) instead of the Poplar? It can be painted…lighter color recommended but there are special paints if darker color required. PVC works great and re-painting will not be needed as often as painted wood.
PVC is pricey.

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JCamp

1733 posts in 2005 days


#8 posted 10-08-2021 12:44 PM

I’ve never been a fan of painted wood. If it’s not painted often the expansion and shrinkage of the wood cracks the paint and water gets behind it and rots the wood. My first house was a log cabin that someone painted and it had that problem. If you are stuck on painting it maybe there is a sealer of some kind that you can use on it first as added protection.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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LesB

3466 posts in 4898 days


#9 posted 10-08-2021 05:39 PM

Poplar would not be my first choice for outdoor use. It is soft and rots easily and quickly. I would suggest cedar or redwood.
Your finishing suggestion should work just fine. Be sure to cover all surfaces. If it will have contact with soil or concrete you need to add something to provide a moisture barrier to the contact point.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Fred Hargis

7480 posts in 3948 days


#10 posted 10-08-2021 05:41 PM

Exterior paints can and will move with the wood. I suspect that putting a sealer on the wood before the primer will do exactly as it’s name implies…seal, and preventing the good adhesion you need with the primer and the bare wood. Adhesion to the sealer could wind up being a big problem. Using a good quality primer (as I said above, best bet is with an oil base) and a good quality paint will protect that wood as well as it can be protected.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

3725 posts in 1056 days


#11 posted 10-09-2021 10:05 AM

+ 1 on oil based primer. It’s slower dry time allows it to pernitrate and seal the wood. If you can prime all the end grain prior to assembly it will be a bonus.

View Mattew123's profile

Mattew123

35 posts in 320 days


#12 posted 10-11-2021 03:14 PM

Definitely use the primer, in my experience if you do not use the primer your wood would be less durable and long-lasting.

Using latex primer may be good idea in my opinion.

View Involute's profile

Involute

12 posts in 2495 days


#13 posted 10-11-2021 04:43 PM

Is it OK to use a water-based paint over an oil-based primer?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7480 posts in 3948 days


#14 posted 10-11-2021 04:49 PM



Is it OK to use a water-based paint over an oil-based primer?

- Involute

Yes. That paint will do well if it’s exterior grade….and I would insist on 100% acrylic (most of them are these days, I think).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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