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Wixey WR750 Table Saw Fence

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Forum topic by w78 posted 10-01-2021 12:13 PM 776 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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w78

7 posts in 70 days


10-01-2021 12:13 PM

just came across the wixey wr750 table saw fence, and it seems like a dream come true

http://wixey.com/table-saw-fence/index.html

i’ve used a vega 26 which i really liked, especially because of it’s micro adjust, but have always wanted super precision that is repeatable, etc, in a t-square type of fence, and holy smokes, looks like wixey might have nailed it

anybody try this fence? haven’t found any reviews so far


19 replies so far

View WilsonLR's profile

WilsonLR

40 posts in 43 days


#1 posted 10-23-2021 09:35 PM

I suppose DRO’s are inevitable. I’d have to trust it a lot to not lose zero between power cycles or setups in the shop. I can’t say I’d want to zero it every time I changed the fence. The fence that caught my eye was a home made one that had 16 TPI all thread running down the rail and a matching nut on the fence. Now that’s repeatability down to 16ths of an inch. Not a fan of aluminum rails. My two cents.

-- Les

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1465 days


#2 posted 10-24-2021 01:23 AM

Might want to look at incra fences.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3158 posts in 1875 days


#3 posted 10-25-2021 06:02 AM

WilsonLR:
You don’t zero the fence for every cut, you zero it once and LITFA unless you change blades or batteries. Zeroing a Wixey is trivial. Move to the zero location and press the zero button. About the same complexity as my digital height gauge, digital calipers, digital angle block, and planer DRO’s.

Wixey’s run on batteries so power line noise/loss doesn’t matter.

All:
The difference, between using a DRO vs an Incra, is the DRO only tells you where you are. The incra forces the fence to where you want it to be — locked instantly on a 1/32” +-0.002” increment — without “rap-tapping”.

With the Incra’s cross hair being far over to the right & my aging eyes, seeing the setting is the hardest part. I’d get a Wixey for my Incra just to make the position easier to see. The Incra would still do its thing, but without squinting & leaning to see the actual 1/32” measure.

I’d add this Wixey to my existing TS fence. For $120 it’s a helluva upgrade.

PS:
Followed OP’s link and I see it’s a complete fence. Wixey isn’t manufacturing the fence, just relabelling someone else’s design. The Wixey fence needs you to drill your TS top to mount. Incra bolts on directly.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2299 posts in 2936 days


#4 posted 10-25-2021 09:06 AM

I put a Wixy on my Harvey. Seemed like a great idea with the easy to zero and mulcible fence faces. I find I don’t use it much.

What I don’t like is what they did. Still two sections so even with great care, there is a splice that adds inaccuracy.
Looking at the link, it may be a big improvement for a job-site saw, but sure does not look as sturdy as even my Harvey. Specs do not say how long the fence is and the fence to T looks real flimsy.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4815 posts in 3635 days


#5 posted 10-25-2021 11:15 AM

I’ve had the Wixey fence readout for years and years. Great product. This looks like the next step, providing a quality fence and micro adjustment to compete with all of the other fence systems out there. The micro adjustment looks like it would be a nice feature. If someone has one, please post a review of the complete set up.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2295 posts in 1465 days


#6 posted 10-25-2021 04:05 PM



I ve had the Wixey fence readout for years and years. Great product. This looks like the next step, providing a quality fence and micro adjustment to compete with all of the other fence systems out there. The micro adjustment looks like it would be a nice feature. If someone has one, please post a review of the complete set up.

- EarlS

Not trying to be snarky, but a serious question-why would you need micro adjust for a digital readout fence?

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3566 posts in 3925 days


#7 posted 10-25-2021 04:45 PM

I have the Wixey DRO on my Ridgid TS. It works great. I would not like to have a saw without one.

I can routinely rip things to within 3 of 2 thousandths of the intended width.

To answer CWW, a micro adjust would allow you to move the fence without bump-bumping it to the exact locatoin. I had to remove my fine adjust (which I didn’t use anyway) to mount the Wixey on my saw. I really don’t mind bump-bumping the fence into position.

Zeroing is fairly easy, but I don’t just push the fence against the blade and hit “zero” because the blade will deflect. What I do is rip the end of a little piece to something like 1” on the Wixey, then measure it with a calliper. I then lift the fence (which is only coupled magnetically to the DRO), set the DRO to the corrected place (of which I will tell next) and then press zero. Then I put the fence back in place.

To zero, subtract the indicated width from the actual width to get the value. Slide the DRO to that value and press zero. I’ve gotten mixed up and moved the opposite way enough times that I have to think about it. So, if I set the DRO at 1 inch, sawed a test piece and found that it was 2 inches (I use big numbers in this example so that the answer is obvious), then after removing the fence, I slide the DRO TO 2-1= 1” and zero it there. Of course, it mght be negative sometimesx too.

You have to re-zero when the battery died (because you forgot to turn it off or a child turned it on) or because somebody (child) pressed zero or when somebody (child) slides the puck off the end of the track. The saw is always unplugged and the key removed when I’m not actively sawing.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4815 posts in 3635 days


#8 posted 10-25-2021 05:03 PM

+1 – Ocelot

While I’ve gotten good at bumping my fence, a micro adjuster is a better way to go. I check the zero on my fence every couple days. If the fence is removed, it is re-zeroed. Unlike Ocelot, I zero the fence on the blade and check to see that the blade just brushes the fence and isn’t bound up. The whole process with the Wixey is quick and easy to the point that it becomes second nature to check it

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View ChromeB's profile

ChromeB

3 posts in 256 days


#9 posted 10-25-2021 08:28 PM

Looks nice, but the specifications don’t seem to add up.

Accuracy is specified as a respectable +/- 0.002in per foot.

But the resolution is 0.005in. So, if the display was showing 6.000in, the actual value could actually be anywhere between 5.9975 and 6.0024 and the device would round it to 6.000in. Just based off the truncation that occurs from its limited resolution, it seems like the accuracy specification should be no better than +/- 0.0025in.

Not to mention, if the setting was 6in and one was interpreting the accuracy specification literally (as one reasonably might), this would make the accuracy at this setting +/- 0.001in since we’re working with half of one foot.

It seems like the engineers at Wixey don’t really understand the specifications they are publishing.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3566 posts in 3925 days


#10 posted 10-25-2021 09:02 PM

ChromeB,

The thing to keep in mind is that we’re cutting wood here.

The 5 thousandths is a global imprecision, not related to distance. What I’m saying is that if you are doing a 1/4” rip, it might be .245 and if you are doing a 16 1/4” rip, it might be 16.245. It really doesn’t matter.

Few cuts on a table saw are more than 24 inches wide (I did some recently at 17” and that’s the most I can remember doing). So, the 0.002 per foot would add up to no more than 0.004 over 2 feet.

The sum of the inaccuracy plus the 0.005 caused by the limitation of precission would bring you out 0.009 in a 24” rip.

In short, it is all the precision and accuracy most wood workers would ever need.

... and it’s relatively cheap. You can put the Wixey DRO on a contractor saw as long as it has a pretty good fence and it makes it capable of doing things as precisely as most people would reasonably want.

I’m talking about the DRO here. The Wixey fence was the original subject of this thread and that’s a more complicated value question.

-Paul

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3158 posts in 1875 days


#11 posted 10-25-2021 11:19 PM

CORRECTION!

Wixey’s fence IS their own patented design.

I stand corrected.

After having messages with THE Barry Wixey of Barry Wixey Development, I see clearly how to mount on my incra and will be ordering the $120 fence DRO today! — DONE!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

2057 posts in 3603 days


#12 posted 10-25-2021 11:28 PM

We have Wixey DRO’s on the tablesaw and one planer. I recommend DRO’s since increased precision means it’s easier to cut replacement parts and/or work in coordination with other people and have everything come out the same.

They work but we’re more fond of the IGauging DRO that was installed on our newest planer. Reasons listed below.

1. Wixey displays to the nearest .005” while iGauging displays to the nearest .0005”.

2. Wixey on the planer has been replaced once under warranty and the replacement (now out of warranty) has become erratic and works off and on. So far, no issues with the iGauging after two years.

3. Wixey has more play on the rails which means it changes position slightly when the tablesaw fence is locked and unlocked. IGauging is more precise and keeps position (this precision fit means it needs precision installing).

On the tablesaw, we always set using the manual scale then bump to exact position with the digital scale. This verifies that the readout is working properly. Digital scales in my experience fail in large increments and not small increments. Wixey tends to fail in .02” increments if it does lose position.

On the planer, we verify thickness after the first pass and final pass with a caliper to ensure the readout is still calibrated. Wixey needs re-calibration every so often. IGauging has never lost position unless the battery was dead.

With the Wixey, we usually got within .005” of the desired dimension. With the iGauging, we usually get within .003”.

-- See my work at http://altaredesign.com

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4815 posts in 3635 days


#13 posted 10-26-2021 12:11 PM

The Wixey DRO for the planer loses it’s calibration more often than the table saw. The same goes for the Wixey on the router. In fact, the Wixey on the router seems to start drifting almost immediately, which makes me wonder how susceptible the electronics are to static electricity (planer) and vibration (router).

I have Wixey DRO on the TS (Delta), planer (DW735), and router table (Jess Em Ultimate Excel II). The router Wixey had to be replaced by Jess Em under warranty as it failed out of the box. I haven’t had to replace the planer Wixey yet, but it is only 2 years old. The TS Wixey was replaced after several years when the screen wouldn’t turn on. As I recall, the batteries are now AA where they were CR2032 before.

I have no complaints about the accuracy. 0.005” is close enough for me.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3158 posts in 1875 days


#14 posted 10-31-2021 03:56 PM

Got the Wixey WR-700 TS DRO. Review is HERE

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View w78's profile

w78

7 posts in 70 days


#15 posted 11-09-2021 02:12 PM

the rail is aluminum, would this wear or maybe dent over time do you think?

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