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would a small piece of metal embedded in the wood be safe to run through a drum sander?

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Forum topic by Jimothy posted 09-28-2021 08:39 PM 768 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jimothy

82 posts in 2187 days


09-28-2021 08:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: drum sander metal piece broken screw safe sander

Hey Y’all, I have a panel glued up that I would like to run through my brand new 16” KING drum sander to get it all flat and nice. I know I can’t do this with a planer haha! There is a small piece of metal in the underside that will be covered up by the battens so visually its not an issue. It’s a piece of a screw that broke the head off, I couldn’t get it out so I just filed it down flush… so I’m wondering if I could run it through my drum sander safely without messing up the machine/drum/sandpaper?

I believe the machines comes with 80 or 120.

I know I have sanded over metal with my random orbital sander in the past with no problems, but I’d rather double check since I just got the machine! haha

Thanks!


12 replies so far

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

2209 posts in 1426 days


#1 posted 09-28-2021 09:23 PM

Your fine. Sneak up on it by taking light passes. Check paper after every other pass. You’ll know by then if it’s gonna cause damage.

At worst you lose some paper which is pretty cheap.

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splintergroup

5877 posts in 2469 days


#2 posted 09-28-2021 09:37 PM

I purposely sand copper and aluminum (clock hour markers) in my DS without issues. +1 on the light passes comment.

For steel (screws), on several occasions I’ve run over the heads of some screws that were part of a sanding jig. Lots of sparks but since I never hog off too much, there were no issues with damage to the belt.

I’d think you’d be fine as long as you are not trying to remove more than a few 10’s of thousandths total. Be sure to shift the part inboard/outboard a but each time so the metal won’t hit the same spot on the grit.

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

438 posts in 2022 days


#3 posted 09-28-2021 11:04 PM

I wouldnt worry about it, just bring the screw down flush or under a bit.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1408 posts in 2349 days


#4 posted 09-29-2021 02:30 PM

If you still have concerns, try one of these to remove the screw and then glue in a plug. It works great.
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/screw-extractor-1-4

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

2159 posts in 974 days


#5 posted 09-29-2021 02:39 PM

I wouldn’t run my dust collector while sanding it. You don’t want sparks going into your collection bag, may not have a shop in the morning…
The metal will most likely strip your paper of grit where the metal goes through, this may cause a small stripe when sanding things afterwards.

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LittleBlackDuck

8111 posts in 2068 days


#6 posted 09-30-2021 11:30 AM

Turn the board over and sneak up on it from the other side… just kidding… as most have advised sand shallow and you won’t do too much damage (to the screw)... just kidding again… shallow passes… not kidding.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Woodnmetal's profile

Woodnmetal

183 posts in 92 days


#7 posted 09-30-2021 08:38 PM

I’m sure most folks are using Zirconium Oxide paper these days. That will take care of the metal screw with no issues if you happen to sand down that far.

————————

@ splintergroup,
I’d think you’d be fine as long as you are not trying to remove more than a few 10’s of thousandths total. Be sure to shift the part inboard/outboard a but each time so the metal won’t hit the same spot on the grit.

———————————————
Id think you”d be fine statement….. kinda scares me haha….

A few 10’s of thousandths total. If you divide 10 by one thousand you get 10 thousandths. As a decimal this is 0.010
a few would be .030 lol … not sure that would work out so well.

————————————-
Maybe you mean hundredths of thousandths ?

In any event. This applies to all of us. When reading stuff on the inerweb… be sure to wear your safety glasses before proceeding in any direction you choose to follow…. Maybe have a good helmet ‘n’ mouth guard close by as well, just in case.

Gary

-- I haven't changed... but I know I'm not the same.

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splintergroup

5877 posts in 2469 days


#8 posted 09-30-2021 08:59 PM


I m sure most folks are using Zirconium Oxide paper these days. That will take care of the metal screw with no issues if you happen to sand down that far.

————————

@ splintergroup,
I’d think you’d be fine as long as you are not trying to remove more than a few 10’s of thousandths total. Be sure to shift the part inboard/outboard a but each time so the metal won’t hit the same spot on the grit.

———————————————
Id think you”d be fine statement….. kinda scares me haha….

A few 10 s of thousandths total. If you divide 10 by one thousand you get 10 thousandths as a decimal which is 0.010,
a few would be .03 lol … not sure that would work out so well.
Maybe you mean hundredths of thousandths ?

————————————-

In any event. This applies to all of us. When reading stuff on the inerweb… be sure to wear your safety glasses before proceeding in any direction you choose to follow…. Maybe have a good helmet n mouth guard close by as well, just in case.

Gary

- Woodnmetal

Yep, about 1/32” 8^)

I’ve never tried the zirconium oxide strips (blue stuff right?) Everything seems to be the aluminum oxide unless you special order

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1755 posts in 3282 days


#9 posted 10-01-2021 01:33 AM

AT the cabinet shop where I worked we used a widebelt sander to sand face frames and doors. If you hit nail, or worse a pocket screw, on the back side, it would make dull spots in the sandpaper, and then on subsequent passes, it would make ridged lines, and eventually burn.

So it’ll ruin your sandpaper in that spot. And those big belts weren’t cheap. If I remember right they were over $70 a belt.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View Woodnmetal's profile

Woodnmetal

183 posts in 92 days


#10 posted 10-01-2021 03:04 PM


AT the cabinet shop where I worked we used a widebelt sander to sand face frames and doors. If you hit nail, or worse a pocket screw, on the back side, it would make dull spots in the sandpaper, and then on subsequent passes, it would make ridged lines, and eventually burn.

So it ll ruin your sandpaper in that spot. And those big belts weren t cheap. If I remember right they were over $70 a belt.

- Underdog

I agree with the Underdog,,,

However, not knowing what type/grade of sand paper the OP is using, along with the grade of screws he may encounter, things begin to change. Therefore, not only costs… safety becomes an issue as well….

The needed information, changes the variable’s as to how much material to take off each pass with the materials on hand to complete the job…. without much or any doubt IMO.

Seriously…Some say hit it at .030 passes, some would say just take light passes.

IMO, you need to know what your up against and what you are reading first, before making a good concise decision about going ahead with it. Well, in the real world where I came from haha.

I know…. information overload.

However, It’s a good thing we don’t only have safety glasses, we have access to helmets, mouth guards and fire extinguishers on the market for these tests in variable situations haha.

Gary

-- I haven't changed... but I know I'm not the same.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

8111 posts in 2068 days


#11 posted 10-01-2021 09:37 PM



..... However, not knowing what type/grade of sand paper the OP is using, along with the grade of screws he may encounter, things begin to change. Therefore, not only costs… safety becomes an issue as well….
- Woodnmetal

This appears to be morphing into a conundrum verging on all the complexities to combat C19 short of total lockdown.

Hell if the OP is going to sand over a screw he doesn’t seem to be as concerned about the looks as much as the potential damage imparted.

Take bilyo’s advice,


If you still have concerns, try one of these to remove the screw and then glue in a plug. It works great.
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/screw-extractor-1-4
- bilyo

and quit screwing around!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Woodnmetal's profile

Woodnmetal

183 posts in 92 days


#12 posted 10-01-2021 10:17 PM

Haha. Well ya know…

If it don’t need to look pretty. Then yes, we quit srewin’ around at this point. Drill n fill. Just use a letter C or #19 drill to get ya close. Don’t even need a backer block for the blow thru… Just pusher
Nuff Said.

-- I haven't changed... but I know I'm not the same.

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