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Forum topic by Mattew123 posted 09-22-2021 02:25 PM 448 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mattew123

28 posts in 112 days


09-22-2021 02:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: spray gun paint

Hello Everyone,

I want to re-paint my dining table and kitchen cabinets. I have Alder kitchen cabinets and an oak dining table. Both are in good shape, But I wanted to paint them while I’m redesigning my kitchen. I wanted to buy a HVLP Spray Gun for this.

So far, I have found Wagner Spraytech and Fuji 2203G. Are they any good? Does anyone have any good recommendations?


17 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7997 posts in 2634 days


#1 posted 09-22-2021 02:53 PM

According to their own infomation, Wagner spayers are mostly intended for painting and outdoor projects. I’ve used mine to spray a poly finish on a headboard and it worked but it was not what I would call a pro finish. If you are painting, it should work fine but I would want a better sprayer if I was going to use it for furniture.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

9000 posts in 1959 days


#2 posted 09-22-2021 04:22 PM

i would rent an airless sprayer for this job :<))))))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7238 posts in 3740 days


#3 posted 09-22-2021 05:31 PM

You know, if you have a compressor you might consider an HVLP conversion gun…and one you could try out without risking a lot of money is the HF purple gun. I’m not recommending this for your final work, though you might find it an acceptable job with the finish you choose. I guess of the 2 you asked about I wouldn’t buy the Wagner. I haven’t tried it…but several other Wagner products have me questioning their overall quality. As for the Fuji, almost everything they sell is very good and my current setup is a Fuji 4 stage. But when it comes to spraying paint, knowing more about what paint you intend to spray is useful. You wouldn’t be able to spray wall paint (you don’t want to use that anyway) with anything mentioned here (that requires an airless), and oil based paint can be thinned to work with most spray guns. So the question is a little harder to answer than “what do I need, or what can I use”. One other note that you didn’t ask about, painting oak can sometimes be really tough. Getting it smooth enough that the grain does telegraph through the paint takes a whole lot of work.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

6489 posts in 4060 days


#4 posted 09-22-2021 06:33 PM

I would recommend a Fuji LX-20. I’ve been using one for a while now, and while it looks similar to most HVLP guns, I find it sprays much nicer with less overspray. I often don’t even touch my final coat, where I had to wet sand the final coat with my other guns.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View xedos's profile

xedos

433 posts in 547 days


#5 posted 09-22-2021 11:50 PM



I would recommend a Fuji LX-20. I ve been using one for a while now, and while it looks similar to most HVLP guns, I find it sprays much nicer with less overspray. I often don t even touch my final coat, where I had to wet sand the final coat with my other guns.
- pintodeluxe

Um………..nope. Lx20 is a fine gun but it’s for compressed air only ! What’s mostly been discussed has been turbine driven.

Even if you wanna go that route , the 20 needs 15+ cfm of clean , dry air to run it. That’s a lot – most guys’ compressors don’t produce anywhere near that amount.


So far, I have found Wagner Spraytech and Fuji 2203G. Are they any good? Does anyone have any good recommendations?

- Matt

Forget Wagner. End of story.

The 2203g is a “package” and the gun is quite good. The turbine is pretty anemic though. You’ll almost certainly want /need at least a 4 stage turbine if you’re goin* to be painting stuff. Two stage will handle clears and very very thin enamels, but you’re gonna need more oomph if you dive into waterborne coatings.

View Mattew123's profile

Mattew123

28 posts in 112 days


#6 posted 09-23-2021 11:10 AM



I guess of the 2 you asked about I wouldn t buy the Wagner. I haven t tried it…but several other Wagner products have me questioning their overall quality. As for the Fuji, almost everything they sell is very good and my current setup is a Fuji 4 stage.
- Fred Hargis

I see… alot of people have been telling me the same thing.


One other note that you didn t ask about, painting oak can sometimes be really tough. Getting it smooth enough that the grain does telegraph through the paint takes a whole lot of work.
- Fred Hargis

Any tips regarding this are appreciated since this will be my first time painting oak.

View Mattew123's profile

Mattew123

28 posts in 112 days


#7 posted 09-23-2021 11:15 AM


Forget Wagner. End of story.

The 2203g is a “package” and the gun is quite good. The turbine is pretty anemic though. You’ll almost certainly want /need at least a 4 stage turbine if you’re goin* to be painting stuff. Two stage will handle clears and very very thin enamels, but you’re gonna need more oomph if you dive into waterborne coatings.

- xedos

So far, I’m leaning towards 2203g but what to do about that oomph. I want something that I can use in future projects if there are any too.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7238 posts in 3740 days


#8 posted 09-23-2021 12:57 PM


One other note that you didn t ask about, painting oak can sometimes be really tough. Getting it smooth enough that the grain does telegraph through the paint takes a whole lot of work.
- Fred Hargis

Any tips regarding this are appreciated since this will be my first time painting oak.

- Mattew123

I don’t paint oak, but if I ddi I would make sure the grain is filled first. This can be done with wood filler or finish. To do it with finish you apply seceral coats, let it dry/cure, then sand it back. If you see divot, you apply more finish and repeat. Since this is a refinish job, I’d sand it smooth and see what you have. If it’s smooth, use a good primer like shellac based BIN then smooth it and paint.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View EBpenguy's profile

EBpenguy

16 posts in 2797 days


#9 posted 09-23-2021 01:08 PM

Have you considered Earlex? I have a 5500 HVLP and it works pretty nice. They offer a number of different nozzles and features to handle thin to thick finishes. The only thing I am not totally thrilled with it is that the air flow never stops, only the paint flow, so it takes a bit to get used to.

You can add Floetrol to the finish to thin it down if you need it to flow a bit more. You will need to do something with the grain on the oak to keep it from telegraphing through the finish – I suggest a paste filler applied prior to any finish. Good luck.

-- Kevin - making shavings when ever I can!

View brtech's profile

brtech

1171 posts in 4169 days


#10 posted 09-23-2021 01:11 PM

there are other choices besides the Fuji. Earlex products are well thought of. Same issues with how many stages and umph. Spraying well is a learned skill. Everyone needs practice. Most common suggestion is spray water on cardboard until you get the feel of the gun and the spray pattern.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1587 posts in 1150 days


#11 posted 09-23-2021 03:11 PM

Achieving a fine finish with a spray rig is more than choosing between two equipment manufacturers. It calls for exact surface preparation, careful choice of finish and finesse with the gun. It gets much more complicated when the object is wooden and installed.

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5877 posts in 2469 days


#12 posted 09-23-2021 03:23 PM

I use Aqua coat for pore filling on burls and like the product. They make other fillers, like stuff for oak cabinets that are to be painted which I have not used, but certainly are widely available.

View Mattew123's profile

Mattew123

28 posts in 112 days


#13 posted 09-24-2021 11:01 AM



there are other choices besides the Fuji. Earlex products are well thought of. Same issues with how many stages and umph. Spraying well is a learned skill. Everyone needs practice. Most common suggestion is spray water on cardboard until you get the feel of the gun and the spray pattern.

- brtech


Thankyou.. that is a good tip

View Mattew123's profile

Mattew123

28 posts in 112 days


#14 posted 09-24-2021 11:05 AM

I found other good options of HVLP spray guns on toolboxnerd but I’m still not sure which one I’ll buy.

Maybe Fuji or @EBpenguy suggested Earlex

View Mattew123's profile

Mattew123

28 posts in 112 days


#15 posted 09-24-2021 11:16 AM

I don t paint oak, but if I ddi I would make sure the grain is filled first. This can be done with wood filler or finish. To do it with finish you apply seceral coats, let it dry/cure, then sand it back. If you see divot, you apply more finish and repeat. Since this is a refinish job, I d sand it smooth and see what you have. If it s smooth, use a good primer like shellac based BIN then smooth it and paint.

- Fred Hargis

Thankyou for the help.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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