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Forum topic by oneclickwonder posted 09-19-2021 05:54 AM 546 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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oneclickwonder

9 posts in 828 days


09-19-2021 05:54 AM

I’m a hobbyist woodworker looking to buy a used table saw. Affordable. Work primarily in hardwoods making small furniture items – stools, benches, shelves, picture frames cutting boards, etc. Currently I’m part of a maker-space shop where I can access a large commercial cabinet saw and saw stop saw.

Looking to pick up something for home use. I’ve got a medium sized shed out back that I’m outfitting to be a little woodworking shop. Somewhere I can do a bit of work when I don’t want to go all the way to the big shop.

Going to look at this Craftsman 10” professional cabinet saw tomorrow. Used, older model of course. Cast iron top which is nice, fence looks solid. Don’t know if anything is true and square, will find out.

Check it out here: https://www.kijiji.ca/v-power-tool/calgary/table-saw/1585830386?undefined

Seller is willing to drop $50 off the price.

Any thoughts? Decent saw or junker that should be passed on?


18 replies so far

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2281 posts in 2889 days


#1 posted 09-19-2021 10:00 AM

NO NO NO. It has no riving knife. Do not use any table saw without a riving knife.

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

4886 posts in 2734 days


#2 posted 09-19-2021 11:05 AM

Can ignore our local safety Nazi TVRgeek who thinks everyone needs the convenience of modern riving knife. Which is impossible on old tools. :-)
All you need is proper blade guard, or splitter to reduce probability of kick back problems. That saw has the original guard, and performs the same safety function as riving knife.
Look up Riving knife on Wikipedia to learn more.

That Craftsman has mobile base, complete blade guard (rare), and one of the better fences those old Craftsman saws used. Ridgid sold similar models that sell for $250-300 USD in good condition in my area. The guard/fence/base makes a ‘Crapsman’ like that worth $150+ ($118? Canadian) on my Craigslist.
Best buy it before OWWM rule #5 happens.

Have owned the several of those Emerson made TS since they were sold in 80’s, with same fence.
Those extruded aluminum fences have one challenge. The rip rail clamps between the front and back rail. When setting up saw, want front rail dead straight, and sometimes need to shim the rails to keep them parallel (equal distant to each other). The cast iron extension wings were more prone to bending the fence when not perfectly aligned. The less expensive stamped steel version have less of an issue. With both rails parallel, and proper technique (push against front rail, then lock); that fence works like a champ.

Bearings and belts are easy to change on those TS. Biggest issue beyond fence is non existent dust collection. Lots of DIY solutions posted on Interwebs.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View jonah's profile

jonah

2207 posts in 4538 days


#3 posted 09-19-2021 12:06 PM

150 is fair for that saw. The fence is very much not great, however. I think captainklutz is understating how difficult it can be at times to get things parallel. I had the ridgid 3650 – basically a newer version of that saw made by the same company. It was fine, but I had to measure every cut to both the front and back of the black because the fence would often come out of parallel with the blade at random times.

If you’re prepared for that kind of futzing, go get it. Just go in eyes wide open and know that it’s going to be a lot more fiddling than the cabinet saws you’re using now.

The miter gauge, if indeed it comes with one, will be garbage.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

7227 posts in 3733 days


#4 posted 09-19-2021 12:19 PM

Along the lines of what was said above. It’s a fair price, but that’s not the best saw. It doesn’t need to be the “best”, just serviceable…and it is very serviceable. Bear in mind that as a starter saw you may run into things that you don’t how to work around. Just ask back here, there are quite a few knowledgeable folks that can help.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

6046 posts in 3591 days


#5 posted 09-19-2021 01:14 PM

That is most definitely not a professional cabinet saw, but should be serviceable for your needs.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

8975 posts in 1952 days


#6 posted 09-19-2021 01:50 PM

dont let rule #5 bite you in the butt :<)))))))))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View drsurfrat's profile

drsurfrat

1024 posts in 426 days


#7 posted 09-19-2021 01:57 PM

new guy, Tony, probably doesn’t know the rules

I have a “cheap” table saw very much like that one, except worse. (paid$100) It works for what I need, with a good blade, it works very well. I am more of a hand tool guy, but for a six foot rip cut, can’t beat it. For cross and miter cuts, I wouldn’t trust it to be better than +/- a degree in angle; too small and sloppy miter slide.

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

8975 posts in 1952 days


#8 posted 09-19-2021 02:51 PM



new guy, Tony, probably doesn t know the rules

I have a “cheap” table saw very much like that one, except worse. (paid$100) It works for what I need, with a good blade, it works very well. I am more of a hand tool guy, but for a six foot rip cut, can t beat it. For cross and miter cuts, I wouldn t trust it to be better than +/- a degree in angle; too small and sloppy miter slide.

- drsurfrat


YOUR RIGHT Mike thanks for helping me out :<)))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

1050 posts in 4633 days


#9 posted 09-19-2021 03:12 PM

with some patience and those 200 bucks, I can find something WAY MUCH better….
problem is the rush, like jumping on the fist thing you see around…....and then regrets are gonna come
it seems you are looking for some of us telling the things you want to hear?

-- "Menos es mas" Ludwing Mies Van Der Rohe

View oneclickwonder's profile

oneclickwonder

9 posts in 828 days


#10 posted 09-19-2021 05:26 PM

Thanks for all the advice! Really helps give me a sense of what I should expect with an older saw like that and what its general value is.

As Francisco mentioned, no need to jump into a saw you wind up frustrated with down the road or wish you had just saved for a bit and got into something better.

What all this has made me realize is that I’m putting the horse before the cart, or saw before the shop in this case. My shed hasn’t been transformed into a useable shop yet, and heading into the winter months, that’s not likely to happen before next spring/summer here in frigid Calgary. And really, looking at my shed space, 13ft wide by 22ft long, i need to have a solid plan for the tool layout. A saw on a mobile base (like the Craftsman) is great in that it can be pushed against a wall when not in use, but perhaps a foldable table saw on wheels would be even better. I refer to those as contractor saws – but I know some people call them jobsite saws. As long as I can get one that can be dialed in accurate enough for precise hardwood work.

In the meantime I can still do everything I need to do at the well-outfitted maker space I’m a part of.

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oneclickwonder

9 posts in 828 days


#11 posted 09-19-2021 11:59 PM

And just to add again to this thread. Another woodworker suggested looking into Rockwell Beavers when searching out older saws – and I came across this one. Don’t yet have the model number (waiting on it from seller) but they’ve done a nice job of building it in to a custom cabinet that could be pushed against the wall when not in use. So good for spaces like mine.

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-power-tool/calgary/rockwell-beaver-table-saw-cabinet/1586235886

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

1050 posts in 4633 days


#12 posted 09-20-2021 12:31 AM

months ago I spotted an ad at Craigslist, a local guy was getting rid of all his grandpa ww tools…I stopped by and picked up lots of nice hand tools and a 1970 Rockwell Band Saw for $50. I dismantled the entire machine, replaced a couple of Brocken parts, installed new belts, switch, cold blocks and fresh oil on the gear box (Metal-wood cutting model), probably $100 more. That machine is the real thing that will last for years and years to come. I have seen nice deals with old Deltas, Rockwells, old powermatic cabinet saws and contractors saws….

-- "Menos es mas" Ludwing Mies Van Der Rohe

View jonah's profile

jonah

2207 posts in 4538 days


#13 posted 09-20-2021 02:55 PM

While there are undoubtedly people using jobsite saws for fine woodworking, they are frustrating to the extreme to anyone used to a real table saw.
Their tables are tiny.
There’s not much room in front of the blade so if you’re cutting a long piece, it can be hard to get a quality cut started.
The fences are frequently complete garbage.
Nonstandard miter slots.

A decent contractor saw like that 113 you looked at will beat those things any day. Quieter, smoother, and better in just about every way. The fence is the only downside, but it’s not like the saw is unworkable – you just need to double check it frequently to make sure it stays parallel to the miter slots and blade.

The advantage of starting with the contractor saw is that you can keep your eye out for a decent used cabinet saw (they’re out there, and you can find some screaming deals if you’re patient) and swap it out. You could also keep your eye out for a fence replacement as well. Sometimes someone is selling a quality fence locally for peanuts.

View SMP's profile

SMP

4816 posts in 1145 days


#14 posted 09-20-2021 03:30 PM



. A saw on a mobile base (like the Craftsman) is great in that it can be pushed against a wall when not in use, but perhaps a foldable table saw on wheels would be even better. I refer to those as contractor saws – but I know some people call them jobsite saws. As long as I can get one that can be dialed in accurate enough for precise hardwood work.

In the meantime I can still do everything I need to do at the well-outfitted maker space I m a part of.

- oneclickwonder

When I travel to the inlaws house a couple times a year, I often get asked to do/make things while there(we usually stay a week). I have made several things with my FiL’s Ridgid jobsite saw on the folding rolling stand. It cuts wood just fine. You just have to square the blade to square, don’t depend on the little gauges on the saw. And I measure from front of saw to fence and back of saw to fence to get the fence square or toed out a tad. Have had no issues making smaller items or larger full size hutch, etc. Just takes a little more time to setup. You can’t just mindlessly slap wood on it and cut perfectly.

View Mike 's profile

Mike

11 posts in 1682 days


#15 posted 09-20-2021 03:57 PM

The Rockwell table saw you referenced in Calgary looks like a Model 6201 which is a 9” saw. These normally came with a GE 3/4 hp motor and is a very light saw. The fence is just awful!

If you look a little further back in the kijiji postings, you should see the 10” contractors saw in the photo. Yes, it is $50 more but in my opinion 10 times the saw. It has the Unifence which is one of the very best. It can be adjusted to the point of not needing a tape measure and will stay in adjustment. The motor is a 2hp that Delta down rated to 1.5 when used on 110 volts. This saw has much heavier trunnions which also stay in alignment better. The fence can be shortened if space is an issue but you can put the right side against a wall and rip 32” wide. The motor has an additional plug in the wiring and can be removed without tools to save just about a foot when storing the saw. By the way, this saw is a 1997 model, one of the last to be made in the US. I hope this info helps and you can contact me anytime with any questions, good luck

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