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Why are antique gouges shaped like duck bills?

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Forum topic by SMP posted 09-10-2021 08:46 PM 711 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SMP

4829 posts in 1148 days


09-10-2021 08:46 PM

I recently picked up some antique gouges and they are all shaped like duck bills. Whereas my brand new pfeil and Hirsch etc are all straight across. was there a reason people sharpened them this way in days of old? These are all just plain straight full handle gouges.


9 replies so far

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Aj2

4069 posts in 3040 days


#1 posted 09-10-2021 10:55 PM

Maybe they are for carving duck bills. :)

-- Aj

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SMP

4829 posts in 1148 days


#2 posted 09-10-2021 11:23 PM



Maybe they are for carving duck bills. :)

- Aj2

What do you have against the platypus?

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JAAune

2036 posts in 3559 days


#3 posted 09-11-2021 12:45 AM

A lot of carvers shape the ends however they like. If the manufacturer shipped gouges with a duck bill profile, it would be a lot of work to grind back to flat for those that want the flat grind.

I like the flat grind for setting in the background. But the sharp corners often get in my way while I’m doing some types of detail work on high relief carvings. That being said, I don’t have a large collection of gouges and don’t do a lot of carving so I left everything with the factory shape.

-- See my work at http://altaredesign.com

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Dark_Lightning

4845 posts in 4351 days


#4 posted 09-11-2021 02:55 AM

We need to see what your gouges look like. If they look like duck bills to you, they may actually be bent chisels. Pics would go a long way with help for some descriptions.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

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SMP

4829 posts in 1148 days


#5 posted 09-11-2021 04:45 AM


We need to see what your gouges look like. If they look like duck bills to you, they may actually be bent chisels. Pics would go a long way with help for some descriptions.

- Dark_Lightning

No they are all straight gouges. I spent about 30 minutes on the large one on my diamond plate, and a little less on the smaller one. I also got a 1/4” that I was able to straighten out pretty quick. You can see the line from before i started. It was hard to trace because it was 3 dimensionally curved, like a ducks bill. They almost looked more like a lath roughing gouge:

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therealSteveN

8855 posts in 1817 days


#6 posted 09-11-2021 06:02 AM

What did you do to those highly collectible lathe roughing gouges???

Jeesh they were probably worth a few grand apiece before ya ruined them… Bummer.

:-)

-- Think safe, be safe

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1751 posts in 3278 days


#7 posted 09-11-2021 11:54 AM


We need to see what your gouges look like. If they look like duck bills to you, they may actually be bent chisels. Pics would go a long way with help for some descriptions.

- Dark_Lightning

No they are all straight gouges. I spent about 30 minutes on the large one on my diamond plate, and a little less on the smaller one. I also got a 1/4” that I was able to straighten out pretty quick. You can see the line from before i started. It was hard to trace because it was 3 dimensionally curved, like a ducks bill. They almost looked more like a lath roughing gouge:

- SMP

Yep. They look(ed) like the old style carbon steel continental lathe gouges – spindle gouges really. The new spindle roughing gouges (not to be used on Bowls!) are ground straight across.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7959 posts in 2630 days


#8 posted 09-11-2021 12:33 PM

The seem a little short so my guess is that a previous owner ground them that way. Perhaps they were recommissioned to be spindle gouges at one point. By grinding the corners back, you are less likely to get catches on a lathe when doing detail work.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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ClaudeF

1383 posts in 2950 days


#9 posted 09-14-2021 09:35 PM

Wood carvers who do 3D sculptures, I believe, tend to use gouges that are straight across the ends. Relief carvers will often use a thumbnail grind on their gouges. This grind has the wings ground back a bit at the top. When doing relief carving, the wings will contact a higher level and cut it before the center of the gouge cuts far enough. With the wings ground back, they will not contact the higher level and allow cleaner cuts.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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